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University of Toronto 



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ALPHABETICAL INDEX ON LAST Pa GE 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

GnadianMachinery 

f MANUFACTURING NEWS ->- 

A monthly newspaper devoted to the manufacturing interests, covering in a practical manner the mechanical, power, foundry 
and allied fields. Published by The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, and London, Eng. 

MONTREAL, Eastern Townships Bank Bldg. TORONTO, 143-149 University Ave. WINNIPEG, 511 Union Bank Building. LONDON. ENG., 88 Fleet Street, I C 



Vol. VII. 



Publication Office: Toronto, January, 1911. 



No. 1 



Bertram Planers 





fTT BERTRAM 60 x 72-inch 
nl OPEN SIDE PLANING 
MACHINE— Motor Driven 
through our Patented Four- 
Belt Drive. 

Equipped with Two 
Heads on Crossrail 
and One Side Head 

Full particulars sent on request. 




The John Bertram C& Sons Co., Limited 

DUNDAS, ONTARIO, CANADA 

Sales Agents:— The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd. Offices:— Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg.Vancouver, Saskatoon, Calgary, St. J ohtt. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The TURNTABLE LATHE 

WITH CROSS-SLIDING TURNTABLE 




A MACHINE FOR MANUFACTURING 

Hard, rapid, continuous manufacture. It has all the elements that such work 
requires: Solidly fastened stationary head. Cross-sliding flat, hexagonal 
turntable Accurate and positive stop systems. Powerful all-geared drive, 
delivering the maximum power at all speeds. Massive construction, with 
weight distributed mathematically correct— fully 30 per cent, heavier than any 
similar machine. An unyielding and unwavering control combined with ease 
ot manipulation and instant response to operating levers. A degree of accu- 
racy and duplication that do away with all final bench fitting. A tool outfit 
that is universal in application to meet any manufacturing demands. 

The MACHINE EVERY MANUFACTURER NEEDS. THE ONE YOU NEED. 

One size. Bar capacity, 2 l / 2 x 26 in. Swing, 20 in. Belt or motor drive. 
Equally efficient on forgings, castings or rod work. 

Write for new catalog, "The Turntable Lathe," just off the press. 

PRATT & WHITNEY 

HARTFORD. CONN.. US A. DUNDAS. CANADA 

OFFICES : 
BOS1 ■ CHICAGO Commercial National Bank Bldg. PITTSBURG : Frick Bldg. ST. LOUIS : 

51« ' PHILADELPHIA : 21s1 and Callowhill Sts. BIRMINGHAM, Ala.: Brown-Marx Bldg. 

Ltd . MONTREAL, ST. JOHN, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, CALGARY and 

UJFORNIA, NEVADA and ARIZONA: Harron, Rickard & McCone, SAN l-'RAN- 

VXGELES Po WASHINGTON | IDAHO Hallidir Machinery Co., SEATTLE and 



Hie advertiser would like to kumv where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



A Most Handy Tool ! 




id one which every mechanic should carry 



in his kit is the 



n 




"B. and C. 

Combination Wrench 

a tool that does duty for two ordinary 
wrenches. 

Of best materials and finish, like all "B & 
C." tools; head, bar and shank are a one-piece 
steel forging. 

Equally handy for nut or pipe work. 
Send TO-DAY for our new complete Tool Catalogue 

BEMIS & CALL HARDWARE 
AND TOOL COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS., 
U.S.A. 




-eh. YOST- 

Solid Jaw and Swivel Bottom Machinist's Vise 




A vise with a grip like grim death; a durability that defies time and 
the hardest usage. 

A vise that will give you a lifetime of perfect service and satisfac- 
tion. The metal in a Yost Vise is of faultless quality, perfectly distri- 
buted and the workmanship is 

Incomparably Good 

The Yost catalog would certainly interest you. Write us, asking 
for a copy. 

CANADIAN YEATES GORDON CO. 



HAMILTON 



ONTARIO 



This Guarantee Goes With Every Vise ; We fully guarantee all of our Vises to 
be satisfactory in every particular and will promptly replace, without 
cost, any parts broken or badly worn when such failures are due to 
faulty material or construction. 



A 500 Kilowatt Westinghouse 
Exhaust - Steam Turbine, using 

exhaust steam from a 300 Kilo-watt Simple 
Corliss Engine and a 100 Kilowatt tandem 
compound automatic engine in a certain small 
power station, is effecting a saving of 79 tons 
of coal monthly over previous rates of fuel 
consumption. 

A feature in connection with the starting 
of this unit, showing its simple mechanical con- 
struction, was that the turbine was installed 
and placed in service by the company's own 
engineers, who, besides having never operated a Westinghouse Turbine, had never seen one 
in service, or even dismantled. The machine had operated a month before an erecting 
engineer reached the plant to make an inspection, which showed the turbine to be in excellent 
adjustment. Publication 9012 tells about our Exhaust-Steam Turbines. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Limited 




Westinghouse Exhaust-Steam Turbine Installation. 



TORONTO 

Traders Bank Building 



General Office and Works, HAMILTON, ONT. 

For Particulars Address Nearest Office 
MONTREAL HALIFAX WINNIPEG CALGARY 

52 Victoria Square Telephone Bide. 1 58 Portage Avenue E. 311 8th Avenue West 



VANCOUVER 

439 Pender Stree. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



RADIAL DRILLS 

Manufactured in 3, 3 1-2, 4, 5, 6-ft. Size. Plain Universal in 5 and 6-ft. Size 




THREE-FOOT PLAIN RADIAL 

These Drills embody features which make our Drills' unsurpassed 
for convenience, accuracy, durability, speed. 

Write for further particulars 

London Machine Tool Co., Limited 

HAMILTON, CANADA 

Eastern Agents :— Rudel-Yeates Machinery Co., 610 Canadian Express Building, Montreal, Que. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



TURRET 






LATHES 



They handle heavy work with extreme accuracy and utmost ease. We build them in sizes 

from 5/8 inch to 3 5/8 inches chuck capacity. 



Hollow 
Hexagon 
is one of 
our princi- 
pal types of 
Turret 
Lathes 
for Bar 
Stock or 
Forging 
work com- 
ing within 
their range. 




No. 2 — 2* x 24 inch Hollow Hexagon Turret Lathe. 
Let us send you full details. 




Hollow 
Hexagon 
Turret 
Lathes 
are built in 
sizes from 
l l A ins. to 
3% ins. 
diameters, 
18 ins. to 
36 ins. in 
lengths. 



THE WARNER <&> SWASEY COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents : A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto, and Williams & Wilson, Montreal 



Our 24 'inch Swing Standard Lathe! 

This is one of the leaders among the celebrated 

NEW HA VEN TOOLS 

a range noted for their ACCURACY, DURABILITY and RELIABILITY. Every machine is backed 
by our unconditional guarantee, and is thoroughly tested before it leaves our shops. 

WRITE FOR DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS AND ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Garvin Screw Machines 

GIVE UNSURPASSED SATISFACTION 

The best materials are used in manufacturing these machines. Parts made of 
Krupp Chrome Nickel Steel, Drop Steel Forgings and Vanadium Steel Springs. 
Absolutely no steel castings used. Machines can be realigned under all conditions 
of wear. Spindles are of large diameter, bearings are ground and run in bronze 

boxes. Cross-slides fitted with 
plug stops, capable of fine 
adjustment, and can be lifted 
from bed without removing 
turret base. Hexagon Tur- 
rets on all machines, except 
the No. 1. Independent stops 
to each of the six turret holes. 
Our turrets and slides have 
long been renowned for their 
rigidity without cumbersome- 
ness, the result being large 
output. The turret momen- 
tum is stopped by a solid plug, 
the lock bolt being used for 
indexing only. Many other 




os. 1, 2 and 2\ Screw Machines 


wire Feed exclusive features 






CAPACITY 








No. 1 No. 2 


No. 2| 


Greatest diameter 


- 


in. I \\ 


u 


Length of Work 


- 


in. 3 6 


8 1 


Swing Over Bed 


- 


in. 9 10* 


14 \ 


Width of Belt 


- 


in. 2 2 1 


° 2 


Weight, crated 


- 


lbs. 575 1100 


1775 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERIES 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION j a V.te r us d1rIct op 



Send for Catalog, Edition " E 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Garvin Machine Co. 



Spring and Varick Streets 



45 YEARS IN NEW YORK CITY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
Universal, Plain, Hand, Vertical, Lincoln, Duplex, Profile and Vertical Spindle Milling Machines; Cutter, Tool and 
Surface Grinders ; Die and Screw Slotters ; Screw Machines ; Monitor Lathes ; Automatic Chucks ; Automatic, Horizontal 
and Vertical Tapping Machines; Duplex Drill Lathes; Gang Drills; Hand Lathes; Spring Coiling Machines; Milling 
Machine and Screw Machine Tools and Attachments; Automobile Machinery and Special Machinery. 



The advertiser would like to knozi' when 



you saw 



his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Canada Machinery Corporation 

PLANERS 

Represent the Highest Efficiency 




For either HEAVY WORK or LIGHT WORK. 
They are RIGID and LASTING, EFFICIENT and POWERFUL. 

Let us give you further particulars 

Canada Machinery Corporation, Limited 

GALT, ONTARIO 



Don't fail to mention ''Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




THE MILWAUKEE 



No. 3B Universal Miller 

is one of a line of Plain and Universal Mill- 
ing Machines for heavy duty service having 
great weight and structural strength in com- 
parison with range. Powerful drive through 
single pulley as shown or at right-angles. 
Electric drive applied without difficulty at any 
time. All gears and bearings automatically 
flooded with oil. Every machine equipped 
with pump for cooling and lubricating the 
cutters and with means provided for return- 
ing the cutting lubricant to its reservoir. 
Wide table for jig work with ample bearings 
for maintained accuracy. Accurate screws 
with sensitive graduated adjustments — all 
adjusting and feed screws have ball thrust 
bearings. Dividing wheel double the size 
usually used — accuracy equal to the best. 
Let us send you more particulars. 



Kearney & Trecker Co. 



Manufacturers 



Milwaukee, Wis. 



% * ^^ 



Agents: 
The A. R. Williams Mach'y Co., Toronto 
Williams & Wilson - Montreal 



&/>e Modern Internal Grinder, No. 6 



This machine certainly 

Does Cut Down 
the Cost 

of internal grinding. 
It is full universal and, 
therefore, can do a 
great variety of work, 
both straight'and taper. 

This machine has 
our improved patented 
belt-tightening device, 
which prevents un 
necessary strain on 
wheel spindle. 

Give No. 6 a trial. It 
will prove itself. 




CAPACITY AND 
DIMENSIONS 

Will swing 10 in. di- 
ameter and grind 10 in. 
deep. 

Extra long spindles 
may be obtained a t 
small additional cost. 

Speed of counter- 
shaft, 325 R.P.M. 

Speed of wheel spin- 
dle, 8,000 to 12,000 R. 
P.M. 

Countershaft driving 
pulley is 10 in. diameter 
by 4 in. face. 

Weight, complete 
with countershaft, is 
about 2,200 lbs. 

Floor space is about 
36 in. by 72 in. 



MODERN TOOL CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



.7 



THE No. 2 CONE DRIVEN 

CINCINNATI MILLER 




OUR CONE TYPE MILLERS have not been forced 
off the market by Single Pulley Machines. And 
they will not be. We are making and selling more 
of them than ever before. We are able to do this because 
we keep our design ahead of all others. 

The illustrations show the No. 2. It has the manufac- 
turer's standard range: — 

PLAIN— 28 in. x 8 in. x 19 in 

UNIVERSAL— 25 in. x 8 in. x 18 in. 

It can be supplied with power feed in one, two or 
three directions. 

We call especial attention to the following features in its design : 

The COLUMN is a complete box of rectangular form. 

The FEED MECHANISM is a single unit, assembled by men who are specialists on this work. 

When in place, it is an integral part of the machine- 
It is high above the floor. The operator need not 
stoop to reach the levers. 

The feed changes may be made within the practical 
limits of milling while taking a cut, without inconveni- 
ence or injury to the gears, because they are all hardened 
and run at moderate speeds. 

The feed index is direct reading, It is the simplest 
index used on any machine tool. 

All these features make this type the ideal machine 
for manufacturing small parts and for Tool Room use. 




GET OUR COMPLETE CATALOG. 



ASK FOR PRICES AND DELIVERY. 



The Cincinnati Milling Machine Company 



CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



Canadian Agents— H. W. PETRIE, Ltd., Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. 



^ 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Morton Draw-Cut Railroad Shaper 




Thisshaper will crown and plane 
axle boxes, plane the brass shell 
to fit, and plane shoes and wedges 
at a saving of from 25 to 40 per 
cent, over ordinary methods. This 
machine is also equipped for do- 
ing a general line of shaper work. 

For further particulars address 

The Morton 
Manufacturing Company 

MUSKEGON HEIGHTS, MICH. 

Also builders of Cylinder Planers and a full line of 
Draw-Cut Pillar Shapers. 



1 \ 


N. 3 Williams Pipe Machine 


■ jHt" 


, Has every device for convenience, 


/mm^H 


HI I J f ' 1 


s durability and speed. 






The Williams Pipe Machines are 




H^HE^_j^HI 


made in six sizes: %" to 2" ; }i" 








W to 3" ; V to 4"; Wz to 6"; 2" to 






a^il ct» HyH 


8" and 3^" to 12". 






Designed for strength and accur- 






B acy, and unexcelled in efficien- 




II cy, steady service and reasonable 


Capacity 1 ' to 6 inch pipe ; Bolt* l i to 2 l A inch 


g§ cost. 


\ _T Send for 

p' Description and Prices. 


WILLIAMS 

Box ia 


TOOL- OO. 

Eria, F»ei., UP. S. A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Handsome, complete new factory devoted to the 



"fjm 




Manufacture of KeMPSMIT H MILLING MACHINES 

Every detail of system and equipment carefully planned for its function in the production of these machines, 
and the plant as a whole is truly a model for its purpose. It will mean better product even than before. 

THE IDEAL PLANT FOR SPECIALIZED MACHINE MANUFACTURE 

The KEMPSMITH MFG. COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Canadian Agents: Rudel-Yeates Machinery Co., Montreal 




THE MODERN 
DESCENDANT 
OF TWO GOOD 
MACHINES 

The Vertical Turret Lathe is the latest 
machine for multiplied saving and output. 

It combines the good features of the Horizontal 
Turret Lathe and the Vertical Boring Mill. 

By vertical construction, chucking is made easy, 
and with both a main and a side head, the holding 
in instant readiness of a complete setting of tools is 
possible. 

Write for new treatise on 
Face Plate Work No. C15. 

It's free — it shows how to "cut costs by cutting 
time between cuts." 

The 

Bullard Machine Tool Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



10 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Type "D. 



6fi 



Hard Service" 



Electrically Operated 

Drills & Reamers 



Built in 6 sizes. Scope 0-2 inches. In- 
crease your output and decrease your 
factory cost. This means more business 
and larger profits. 

You can do it by using "HARD SER- 
VICE" Portable Drills and Reamers. 

These are your ultimate tools if you 
desire maximum production at minimum 
cost. 

Further information upon application. 

Write for Bulletin No. 20. 



The Van Dorn & Dutton Company, 

CLEVELAND 

Canadian Representative: R. E. T. PRINGLE, Eastern Townships Bank Building, Montreal, Quebec. 



Like the cut in this 
ad., The Little Giant 
stands alone in its 
field as the leader 
in design, mater- 
ial, efficiency 
and dura- 
bility. 




Little Giant Air Drill 



TORONTO 
42 York Street 



The Holden Company, Limited 



MONTREAL 
354 St. James Street 



WINNIPEG 
29 H Portage Ave. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



II 



A Mighty 
Trio 




Made by 



Trimont Mfg. Co. 

Roxbury, Mass. 



Send for Catalog 
No. 200 



U. S. Electric Drills and Grinders 

Are saving time and labor in every shop they are in — for drilling in metal they are 
superior to any kind of portable drill, cost 50% less to run than air drills. Attach 
to any lamp socket to operate. 




3-SIZES 
3/16 inch, W.G.T. 6 lbs. 
. J inch, W.G.T. 9 lbs. 
I inch, W.G.T. i2lbs. 




4-SIZES 
I - 1 - 1 J and 1 i inch. 



J inch— 2 SPEED 
Speed, 400-750 R: P.M. 




All motors wound for 1 10 or 220 volts. Direct or alternating current. 

Write for Catalogue. 



Portable Radial Drill 
Full Universal 
2-sizes, 7/8 and i\ inch. 



Montreal 



For sale by THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., LTD. 

St. John, N.B. - Toronto - Winnipeg - Calgary - Vancouver 



The United States Electrical Tool Co. 

CINCINNATI, - OHIO, U.S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 

-' 



3M 



12 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



wwv^**v^*'WWV^^A>wv^ 



A Splendid Tool for the Pattern Shop 

Over 1,000 now in use— two-thirds of them were sold to Pattern Shops 

This machine is designed es- 
pecially for the Pattern Shop. It 
accomplishes perfectly any work 
to which it may be applied in the 
Pattern Shop, such as Plane, sur- 
face, straight or tapering, joint, 
edge, etc. 

Our No. 254 

Bench Hand 

Planer 

is not expensive — the price is 
within the reach of all— the Pattern 
Maker cannot afford to be without it. 

WRITE FOR LARGE 
ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR 

J. A. Fay C& 
Ega n Co. 

362-382 West Front Street 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 




No 254 Bench Hand Planer. 



MARINE ENGINES 
and PUMPS. 

SHOE MACHINERY 
A Specialty 




BRASS and IRON 

CASTINGS. 

BOILERS and 

REPAIRS. 



That we have exceptional facilities at our disposal for the manufacture of all kinds of Machinery 
— in addition to our business as Brass and Iron Founders, General Contractors and Shoe Ma- 
chinery Engineers — has been amply proved this year. In the short space of five months, we built 
and installed all the Engines and Boilers of the new sister steamers "Levis" and "Lauzon," whose 
trial trips were a complete success. We make a specialty of all kinds of Marine Engine Work, 
and shall be glad to quote for first-rate products only. 

SHOE MACHINERY. Manufacturers of "Non-Royalty" Machines, Metallic and Good- 
year, "Fortuna" Skivers, and "Climax" Presses, Sand-papering, Lasting and Loose Studding 
Machines. 

Wire of every description for Slugger and Standard Screw Machines. 



The Canadian General & Shoe Machinery Company, Ltd 



ERNEST CARON, Managing Director 

LEVIS, Quebec 



7 he advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



13 



m 






As a Matter of Economy, Can You 




10" Quick Change and Double BacK Gear Lathe 



Afford to buy or use Lathes of obso- 
lete pattern, when at little or no 
greater cost you can put Into your 
shops such tools as the "CHAM- 
PION"? 

Our Patented Double Back Gear 
Control is one of the many really 
modern conveniences attracting the 
attention of shop economists every- 
where. 

Why change from low to high- 
gear or vice versa by the old, slow 
and laborious way of moving Ihe 
gears by hand, when, on the 
"CHAMPION" the operator makes 
the change instantly by the "Lever" 
on the front of Headstock without 
leaving his working position in 
front of the Lathe? 

This and many other important 
features will be found in our Cata- 
logue of 10-12-14-16 and 18-Inch 
Lathes. 

WRITE FOR THE "QUICKER 
AND BETTER WAY." 



CHAMPION TOOL WORKS COMPANY 



Station B 



CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



f\ Practical Furnace 

for Case Hardenin 

THE STEWART NO. 1 



Case Hardening and Annealing 
furnace has proved its worth 

It gives uniform results because designed and constructed particularly for the pur- 
pose. This feature is absolutely necessary to successful case hardening of machinery 
steel parts. 

The STEWART has extra heavy linings and heavy clay faced doors. There 
are many other exclusive features which you ought to be posted on. Send for large 
furnace catalog which gives complete specifications of this furnace and the entire 
STEWART line. 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co. 

144 La Salle Avenue, 

Chicago 



STEWART 




Foreign Repre«entatJTe»: Chicago Flexible Shaft Co.. 1 1 D«nm»rk St.. Charing Cro«» Road. London. W.C. Fanwick Frtm & Co., 8 rut 

Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



de Rocroy, Parii 



U 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




High Speed Steel Has a Solid Foundation 
In a Name TKat Means Something 

Cutting speed attained on cast iron : Roughing cut, 140 ft. per minute — finishing cut, 210 ft. 
per minute. 

In NOVO SUPERIOR you secure a materially increased speed over the high speed steels now in 
use, the highest quality, greatest toughness, longest life (3 times that of any other) and exceptional 
ability to cut very hard materials. The cutting edge retains its sharpness from 3 to 4 times longer 
than other high speed steels. Hardens in oil, air or water, and is now carried in stock in our ware- 
house in all current sizes, fiat, squares and rounds ; annealed and unannealed. 

SEND US A TRIAL ORDER AND CONVINCE YOURSELF 

HERMANN BOnXR C& COMPANY 

332 ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL 



Specify Distinctly 




STAG BRAND 



Allen's Stag Brand 




Hollow Mining 
Drill Steels 

All Sizes and Sections from Stock 




SOLE MAKERS AND SELLERS 



EDGAR ALLEN & CO., Limited 

330 St. James Street ... Montreal 



443 



Don't fail to mention adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



15 





"Sterling" Hack Saw Blades 

It is the universal custom at the beginning of the year to make new 
resolutions. This applies to business as well as social life. With the 
ormer we wish to deal, 
f 

It is the study of every manufacturer to devise ways and means by 
which to cut expenses. One large item of expense in the manufacture of 
many products is a Hack Saw Blade. Those who in the past have been 
using "STERLING" will look no further to effect economy in this direc- 
tion, but for those who up to the beginning of the new year have not been 
users of the "STERLING " we would strongly recommend, as one of their 
business resolutions, to place a trial order tor a Blade which, for many 
years, has been tried and not found wanting. 

The remarkable success attained by the " STERLING " Blade is in 
a large measure due to the fact that the mill from which steel is procured 
that goes into its manufacture has a reputation second to none, and for uni- 
formity of its product superior to any. 

Added to the above fact, careful workmanship, particularly in the 
hardening process, prove by the most thorough and exhaustive tests that 
the " STERLING" has no equal and is in a class by itself. 



"STERLING" 
Power Hack Saw Machines 



These machines are known the world over for their efficiency and 
economy. 

The Nos. 1 and 2 Machines are used for cutting small and medium 
size work. 

The No. 3 Machine is designed to cut any size work up to and^in- 
cluding 8 in. round or 8x12 in., and it is without question the most 
economical, fastest cutting and up-to-date Hack Saw Machine on the 
market. 

■When looking for a Hack Saw Machine, you can make no mistake 
in ordering a "STERLING." 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Diamond Saw and Stamping Works 

BUFFALO, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Handled by Fir t Class Jobbers 
s 





Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



r 



i6 



CANAEIAN MACHINERY 



jft 


ylLl 



High-Speed Steam-Hydraulic Forging Presses 

Double your production with one-half your labor cost and steam consumption. Cost of 
repairs reduced Eliminates heavy shocks and vibration. 

"SINGLE LEVER CONTROL" 

Small sizes — single-frame type. Large sizes— four-column type. 

Built for doing all classes of forging, shearing or pressing. 

100 Tons to 12,000 Tons Capacity 
UNITED ENGINEERING & FOUNDRY CO. 

2305 Farmers Bank Building, PITTSBURG, PA 
EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS FOR UNITED STATES. CANADA AND MEXICO. 
Manufactured under Davy Bros., Lid., Patents. 



DIE BLOCKS 



CRUCIBLE OR OPEN 
HEARTH STEEL 



Canada Forge Co., Limited, 



Welland, Ontario 



A Machine Wren 

/r\ Drop Forged TurnbUCkleS Screw Drivers 
/■D\ Pliers 




ALL KINDS OF *R£.CIAL DRoP FORGINGS 

Send Model* or Blue Prints for Estimates. 



Pliers 
Structural 

Wrenches 
Track 
Eye Bolts 
Lathe Dogs 
Etc. 



Canadian Billings & Spencer, Limited Welland, Ont. 




Drop-Forged Steel Throughout 



"KEYSTONE" 



WESTCOTT " 




Strongest Wrenches 
Made. 



Send for Catalogue. 



Made in 3 sizes. 




Made in 4 sizes, 



THE KEYSTONE MANUFACTURING CO. 

BUFFALO, N.Y., U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



17 



GARVIN CIRCULARS 

Frequent changes necessitate issuing circulars to keep our printed matter up to date. The following 
list illustrates and describes the latest improvements in the various machines mentioned, and any 
circular you may be interested in, will be sent to you upon request. 



Circular Machines 

No. 

100 Die Slotting Machine. 

102 No. 3 Universal Cutter Grinder. 

104 Double-Geared Dividing Head. 

118 Grinders (Cutter and Surface). 

1 19 Stop and Open Chucks. 
121 Cam Cutter. 

128 No. iy 2 Universal Milling Machine. 

129 Automatic Chucks. 

L30 Nos. 13 and 13V 2 Plain Milling Machines. 

133 Automatic Chucks. 

*134 No. 2 Mfg. Universal Milling Machine. 

135 No. 2-A Universal Milling Machine. 

136 No. 15 Plain Milling Machine, 60-in. Feed. 



In Press 



FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION 



Circular Machines 

No. 

137 No. 14 Mfg. Plain Milling Machines. 

138 Automatic Tappers. 

*139 No. 22 Vertical Milling Machine. 
140 Rapid Screw Slotter. 

142 Nos. 14 and 15 Vertical Spindle Milling- 

Machines. 

143 No. 3 Duplex Milling Machine. 

144 Duplex Drill Lathes. 

150 Nos. 11 and 12 Plain Milling Machines. 

152 No. 2 Hole Grinding Machine. 

153 Nos. 21 and 22 Plain Milling Machines. 

154 Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Hand Milling Machines. 

155 Thread Milling Attachment. 

j ASK YOUR DEALER 

OR 
I WRITE US DIRECT 



THE GARVIN MACHINE COMPANY 



269 Spring Streets 45 YEARS IN NEW YORK CITY 



A CORDIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO 
CALL AND INSPECT OUR WORKS. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Universal, Plain, Vertical, Lincoln Duplex, Vertical Spindle, Profile and Hand Milling Machines; Die-Slotting Machines, Uni- 
versal Cutter and Tool Grinders; Horizontal, Vertical and Automatic Tapping Machines; Duplex Drill Lathes; Gang Drills; 
Screw Machines; Monitor Lathes; Chucking Lathes; Forming and Screw Head Shaving Machines; Spring Coiling Machines; Screw 
Slotters; Hand Lathes; Tap and Reamer Fluting Machines; Special Automobile Machinery; Special Machines, Tools and Attach- 
ments. 



ARMSTRONG £S?ders 

Adopted by United States Government Arsenals and 
by the United States Navy, both afloat and ashore 





ARMSIRONGTOOt HOLDER 




NOTE extra large tool steel set screw and REINFORCED support under the cutter. 

THEY GIVE INCREASED CAPACITY AND LASTING QUALITY 





Patented 
May 12, 1895 
May 28, 1901 





SAVE ALL FORGING, 70% GRINDING, and 90% TOOL STEEL. 

WE MAKE A COMPLETE LINE OF RATCHET DRILLS. 
WRITE FOR SPECIAL CIRCULAR AND PRICES 



** 



Do you want our new Catalog ? 
It's a Tool Holder Encyclopedia. 



Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 

"THE TOOL HOLDER PEOPLE." 

106 N. Francisco Avenue, CHICAGO, U.S.A. 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



There are several tapping operations which you are now doing 
with solid taps on your Drill Press or Turret Lathe which 

Geometric Collapsing Taps 

WOULD DO THE WORK BETTER, AND IN HALF THE TIME. 




GEOMETRIC COLLAPSING TAPS are as rigid as solid 
taps while cutting, but collapse their chasers automatically 
at the end of the cut, and there's no reversing required to 
back them out. We will be glad to tell you more about them 
if you will tell us your requirements. 

The Geometric Tool Company 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents: Williams & Wilson, Montreal, Quebec ; A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Totonto, Ont. 




ARE THE STANDARD FOR ACCURACY, 
WORKMANSHIP, DESIGN AND FINISH 



THE ACME OF RULE PERFECTION 



Mi|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|i|;ji|i|i|i|i|iji|i|!|;[i|ij'|i^| 

.„„•#' THE L S. STABBETT CO. {\ un Jtni w — = 

Tempered N? 4 ATHD l mass u s a 2 N9 403 n _= 

64 J I . , • | -= 



Spring Tempered Rules with heavy figures, graduated end and beveled edge. Made in 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24-in sizes- 
No. 403, No. 4 grad., with 64th's on the beveled edge, and graduated in 32nd's on opposite sides of one end. 
No 404. No. 4 grad.. with 64th's on the beveled edge, and graduated in 32nd's on one side and 48th's on the other side of 

the same end. 
These rules are the most advanced product of the rule maker's art. They are sold at the same price as ordinary spring 

tempered rules. 

S«nd for Free Catalogue, . No. 173, of Flno Mechanical Tools 

THE L. S. STARRETT CO. 

ATHOL, MASS., U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



19 




Utility 



Utility, embodying CONVENIENCE, EFFICIENCY, AC- 
CURACY and DURABILITY, is our proposition on DRILL 
CHUCKS. The UTILITY of the JACOBS IMPROVED 
DRILL CHUCK is so great and universally recognized by the 
most eminent mechanics that its utility is established. Don't be im- 
posed upon with inferior imitations. Insist upon having the 
genuine JACOBS IMPROVED DRILL CHUCK. On each of 
these CHUCKS is printed' "THE JACOBS MFG. CO.,— 
HARTFORD, CONN., U.S.A.— PATENTED SE^T. 16, 1902." 



The Jacobs Manufacturing Co., Hartford, Conn., U.S.A. 



"SL0C0MB" 

made for this purpose 




COMBINATION CENTRE DRILLS AND COUNTERSINKS 

not only save a great deal of time in centreing lathe 

work, but their first cost is less than any other tools 

Slocomb Drills are made of a superior steel, giving great strength 

and endurance. Besides the saving in time, the use of these Drills 

ensures proper clearance and correct angles. 

WRITE FOR THE COMPLETE SLOCOMB CATALOG. 

J. T. SLOCOMB CO., Providence, R.L, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents : 

Wood, Vallance Co., Toronto and Hamilton. 
* Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, 
j Foss &, Fuller, Montreal. 




Grips 
Like 
Grim 
Death 



The 
Russell 



Anti-friction 

Drill 
Chuck 



is a time and money saver that should find a place in 
every up-to-date shop. Hh* 4 * 

It is instantly adjusted or released without key, span- 
ner or wrench, and is entirely automatic in its action. 
Friction is practically eliminated by ball bearings. The 
"Russell" is the only chuck that will hold straight-shank 
drills without slipping. Made in 5 sizes Write for 
details and prices. 

Write for Catalogue. 
Distributing Agents (or Canada 

The General Supply Company of Canada, Limited 

Ottawa, - - Canada 

Made only by 

The Russell Anti-Friction Drill Chuck Co.. Elmira. N.Y. 



PERFECT IN 

Design, Construction and Finish 

If you are requiring 
speed lathes, defer 
your purchase until 
you have examined 
our range of 

Grinding 

Polishing 

and 

Buffing 
Machinery 

They are 
guaranteed 
to give con- 
sistently 
satisfactory 
service. 

Send for catalogue 
descriptive of full 
range of lathes we make. ■ 

J. G. BLOUNT COMPANY 

EVERETT, MASS., U S.A. 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers 



20 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




B 



s 



That New Process Pinions are noiseles s 
is easily verified by asking any one 
who has seen them work. 

That New Process Pinions are durable is equally 
well proven through their constant use year after year on 
the best American machine tools and motors. Men who 
have the reputation of their product at stake specify New 
Process in preference to other rawhide pinions because 
they know that our patented curing process makes the 
rawhide which wears like metal, lasts like metal and is 
in every way the equal of metal save for the noise. 

You can get New Process Pinions on short notice to 
fit machines now in service. Make the trial on one drive. 
Tell us your requirements and ask for booklet, " Noise- 
lessIGearing." 



<iNEW PROCESS IS TO ALL OTHER 



The New Process 

OFFICE 6 WORKS 




RAWHIDE AS STEEL IS TO IRON 



Raw Hide Co. 

SYRACUSE. N.Y. 



A Light Pulley Should 

Carry Weight With You, 

Mr. Mill Man 




You save one h.p. for every ton of pulley weight you 
eliminate. 

Where cast iron pulleys are used, there is an enormous 
weight. 

"ONEIDA" Steel Pulleys weigh bul one-quarter to one- 
third as much as cast iron. They enable you to save 6o to 
75 per cent, of your total pulley weight and a corresponding 
saving in power is the result. Are you on? Catalogue? 

Oneida Steel Pulley Co. 

Oneida, N.Y. 



Z5/>e 



POSITIVE 

Combined Jaw and 
Friction Clutch 

WILL ELIMINATE YOUR CLUTCH TROUBLES 

SIMPLY POSITIVELY 

POSITIVE SIMPLE 




As it Appears in Service 

The only positive clutch that can be operated 
under load. 

POSITIVE 

COMBINATION 

SPLIT PULLEYS 

Positive saving in power. Positive grip on shaft. 




Wood Rim Steel Arm Malleable Hub 

Save the entire cost in less than one year. 
Write to-day for complete catalogue 

The Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Ltd. 

11-13 Jarvis:St.,5TORONTO,fOnt/13 



a 






The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



21 



CYCLONE FANS 




When installed for supplying MECHANICAL 
DRAUGHT to boilers always prove to be a pay- 
ing investment because they INCREASE THE 
EVAPORATION of the boilers and so insure a 
constant supply of steam. 

They also REDUCE THE COAL BILL by 
making it possible to burn a cheaper fuel, and 
DISPENSE WITH BLACK SMOKE by enabling 
the fires to extract the full caloric value from 
the fuel. 

ASK OUR AGENTS FOR 
SPECIAL BOOKLET No. 131 

Matthews & Yates, Ltd. 

Swinton, Manchester, England 

Agents for Canada : Bain & Mitchell. Y.M.C.A. Bldg.. Montreal 
Anglo-American Supply Co.. Ltd.. 311 Enderton Bldg., Winnipeg 



Burn 

Cheap 

Fuel 

With the Sheldon Mechani- 
cal Induced Draft System 
you can cut the cost of fuel 
in half, by utilizing a cheap- 
er grade, or can secure bet- 
ter and almost smokeless 
combustion from the same 
grade of fuel that you are 
now using. 

Send for Catalogue 
No. 14 

SI1ELD0NS LIMITED - GALT, ONTARIO 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



22 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Three Ways of Saying the 

Same Thing 




THE 

Waterous Engine Works 
Co., Limited 

BRANTFORD - CANADA, 



Start the New Year right 

Cut down the cost of your Light and 
Power production. 

INSTALL A "McEWEN" 

The McEwen Engine is built with special 
reference to use in the production of electrical 
energy. A high grade, high speed, automatic 
Engine that is essentially a steam, time and worry 
saver. 

Built in simple and Compound units of from 
10 to 700 h.p. From this variety you can be 
sure to get just the one which your conditions 
require. 

Send for Our McEwen Bulletin. 



Robb Corliss Engines 




Have the Armstrong-Corliss valve gear, 
which will operate at a higher speed 
than the ordinary releasing gear. 

This valve gear does not depend on 
springs or dash pots for closing, and 
runs without noise. 

The wearing parts of the valve gear are 
enclosed in a casing and run in oil so 
that friction is reduced to a minimum. 



Robb Engineering Co. 



AMHERST, N.S. 



LIMITED 



DISTRICT 0FFICE8: 



Canadian Express Building, Montreal 
Traders Bank Building, Toronto 
Union Bank Building, Winnipeg 
Grain Exchange Building, Calgary ' 



R. W. Robb, Manager 
Wm. McKay. 
W. F. Porter, " 
J. F. Porter, 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



_U C_ 



-1 .--. •*»• - - 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



23 



BOILERS 




"INCUS" is the buy word for Boilers. 

" INCUS " Boilers represent the highest test of perfection and design, workmanship and material. 

We make all kinds for any service. Let our salesmen tell you about Inglis Boilers. 

'He John Inglis Company, Limited 

ENGINEERS AND BOIIER MAKERS 

14 Strachan Avenue - TORONTO, CANADA 




IMIMHM 

tiiiit 

• MM! 




Boilers 

of All Kinds 
for All Purposes 



With our modern and 
splendidly equipped boiler 
shops we are in a position 
to turn out the highest 
grade on the shortest 
notice. 

Illustration shows our latest type of 18 foot Ontario Boiler. 

Ask us for prices and information on anything relating to power. 

The Goldie & McCulloch Co., Limited 

Gait, - Ontario, - Canada 



WESTERN BRANCH 
248 McDermott Ave. , Winnipeg, Man. 



QUEBEC AGENTS 
Ross & Greig, Montreal, Que. 



B.C. AGENTS 
Robt. Hamilton & Co.. Vancouver. B.C. 



WE MAKE whe elock Engines, Corliss Engines, Ideal Engines. Gas Engines and Producers. Piston Valve Saw Mill Engines. Boilers 
Heaters, Tanks. Steam and Power Pumps. Condensers, Flour Mill Machinery, Oatmeal Mill Machinery Wood Working 
Machinery, Transmitting and Elevating Machinery, Safes, Vaults and Vault Doors. 

ASK FOR CATALOGUES, PRICES AND ALL INFORMATION 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



M 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




The 

Wright Wrench 

CERTAINLY IS THE 

Right Wrench 

lust press the thumb and adjust instantly to any sized nut. Simple, practical, and a wonderful time-saver. 

The adjustment is constant — it stays put. There is no spring" or back-lash as in screw wrenches, 
so that it can neither slip nor get locked on a nut. 

The Wright Wrench will do more work in less time than any other wrench, and will stand the hardest 
usage. It is especially good for night work, as it is adjusted with the hand that holds it, leaving the other 
free for handling the torch. It's splendid, too, for cold weather. 

L'sed and endorsed by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, by master mechanics of several railroads, of a United 
States navy yard and of the Bell Telephone Co., and by hundreds of construction companies and machinists. 

The Wright Wrench is made in the following sizes — 6 inch, 8 inch, 10 inch, 12 inch, 15 inch, 18 inch. Also 
Automobile Wrenches in 8 inch and 10 inch size. Handles in all cases are drop-forged as part of bar. 

Sample of the 10-inch wrench will be sent express prepaid to any point in Canada on receipt of $1.00. 

John Millen 6& Son, Limited 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



DON'T BORE! 

^Use Shelby Seamless Steel Tubing^ 

For use as Bushings, Hose Mandrels, Roller Bearings, Lathe Spindles and many similar parts, the 
only preparation necessary on a Shelby Seamless Tube is to cut it the proper length. You can easily see 
the saving of time and expense over boring a steel bar. 

New uses are being found every day by ingenious mechanics for Shelby Seamless Tubing. From 
being a dozen years ago merely a specialty for the use of Bicycle Manufacturers, Shelby Seamless 
Tubing has come to be a stand-by in hundreds of shops. It has thousands of applications, many of them 
simple and direct, like those mentioned above, but in countless other instances it is merely the BASIS of 
more complex structures. 

To meet the demand for special forming operations, our mills have been fully equipped for carry- 
ing out the heaviest and most difficult kinds of special work on tubing of all sizes and thicknesses, such 
as flanging and bending tubes for automobile axles, upsetting drill rods, swedging, expanding, coupling 
and tapering tubes. 

If you will tell us the nature of your work we shall be glad to suggest ways in which you can save 
on manufacturing costs by using either simple or modified Shelby Seamless Tubing. Write 

JOHN MILLEN C& SON, LIMITED 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

Address all correspondence to 321 St. James Street, Montreal. 






The advertiser would like to know where you, saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



25 



"ATLAS" 

Chain Blocks 1 

The Atlas is the Fastest, 

Strongest and most 

Durable 



Worm Gear Chain Block on 
the market. It is made of steel 
and wrought iron and has 
proved its lasting qualities in 
thousands of the world's lead- 
ing machine shops. In shops 
and warehouses where quick 
handling of pieces is an im- 
portant factor of the day's 
work Atlas Blocks will pay for 
themselves in a shorter time 
than any other block. 

Always in stock. 
Send for Catalog 



SCHUCHARDT & SCHUTTE 



307 Coristine Building, MONTREAL 



New York 
Stockholm 



London Shanghai Berlin Vienna 

St. Petersburg Copenhagen Budape 



Wzz> MILLERS 




No. 3% Hand and Power Feed Miller. 

We build Hand and also Hand and Power Feed Machines 

SEND TO-DAY FOR COMPLETE CATALOG 

MACHINE COMP'Y 

23 Front St., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



You Can Adjust This Clutch to Carry Any Load 

thus eliminating all liability of overstrain or breakage of the 
machine operated. In the past eight years 

&/>e BERG 
BALANCED FRICTION CLUTCH PULLEY 

has been used with the utmost satisfaction on 
over a thousand machines of various kinds. 

It can be started as gradually as desired. 
Frictions are made of fibre— not wood, and 
the pulley is brass bushed. 

We guarantee each clutch to carry its 
rated capacity with ease. 




It will pay you to investigate this clutch 
as It is a trouble-killer and power-saver 
wherever It is installed. Write for cir- 
cular and prices. 



The Berg Machinery Mfg. Co. 



Limited 



Bathurst and Niagara Sts. 



Toronto, Ont. 



We make Castings. Engines, Boilers. Tanks, and Sheet Metal Work of all kinds. 

Mining an:l Brick Michincry, 



Pon't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



20 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Peterborough Lubricator Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO 

Manufacturers of The Philadelphia Grease Cup 

For the Dominion of Canada 

HERE'S 
THE CUP ! 

Here are some of the 
advantages of the 

"Philadelphia" 
Grease Cup 

First — The "Philadelphia" is guaran- 
teed to save from 331-3 1o 50 per cent, 
(with any standard urease) over any other 
system of lubricating machinery bearings. 

Second— The "Philadelphia" is nol a 
"new*' urease cup. Several years hard 
service in all parts of the country under 
every condition, on all kinds of machinery 
has proved every claim made for I hem. 

Third — The "Philadelphia" is the only automatic grease cup on the market 
in which compressed air is the feeding force. 
Fourth — Because compressed air is used, the "Philadelphia" is the only cup in which the pressure is ab- 
solutely uniform from the time the cup is full of grease until the last drop is used. 

Fifth — The pressure always being uniform is what guarantees that the consistency of the grease never 
changes in a "Philadelphia" cup. By this a saving which cannot, be accomplished in any other* cup. 

Sixth — It is for these reasons that the "Philadelphia" cup is just as positive in action feeding up, down, hor- 
izontally, or in any position. 

Seventh — Neither is the efficiency of the "Philadelphia" affected by centrifugal force when used on such 
positions as loose pulleys, etc. 

Eight— The "Philadelphia" i s absolutely dust proof. 

Ninth — The profits by the use of "Philadelphia" cups in the bis saving of his time and labor, to 

say nothing of the attendant peace of mind as to the condition of his journals or the increased efficiency and 
decreased expense account he can show. 

Tenth — "Philadelphia" cups appeal to the man who pays the bills because they are not only cheaper in first 
cost than spring or force feed cups, but effect a 33 1-3 to 50 per cent, saving in grease and cost of operation. 

8izes of Cups Manufactured— ^-oz. 1-oz. 3-oz. 6-oz. Plain Steel and Polished. 
Write for Price Lists and Discounts to 

Peterborough Lubricator Mfg. Co., Ltd., PETE ™T CH 





The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



27 






MILLIONS WASTED 

By Users of "Genuine** Babbitt 

The high price of tin, which is controlled by manipulators, who can juggle the price up or 
down to suit their convenience, should cause users of "Genuine" Babbitt to consider seriously the 
advisability of adopting some cheaper, suitable substitute. 

A "Genuine" Babbitt should contain about 88 per cent. tin. It is a notorious fact that tin is a 
very dry metal and it is by no means what.it is claimed to be as a bearing metal, as its anti-frictional 
qualities are comparatively very poor. A "Genuine" Babbitt will not fill in the interstices and con- 
dition the shaft as Magnolia Metal does. Unless a "Genuine" bearing is kept flooded with oil it 
is liable to become hot and run out, whereas a Magnolia-lined bearing, under the same conditions, 
will more that likely run for years without any perceptible rise in temperature, on very scant 
lubrication. Unless a bearing metal is poured in a separated condition the weight of the shaft will 
rarely, if ever, cause it to squash. It is usually frictional heat that causes this trouble, to which 
"Genuine" Babbitt is very susceptible, and, therefore, it naturally follows that a high-grade, anti- 
friction metal like Magnolia is very much more dependable. Not only is Magnolia superior 
anti-frictionally, it will actually withstand 19 per cent, greater compression test than "Genuine" 
Babbitt. Thousands of practical users have made this discovery and are using Magnolia in pre- 
ference to all other bearing metals. 

Some years ago we had Dr. Torrey, Chief Assayer of the U. S. Mint. New York, test all the 
leading "Genuine" Babbitts then on the market. Every one of these Genuines ran out in from five 
to fifteen minutes under pressures ranging from 500 lbs. to 1,400 lbs. per square inch, whereas 
Magnolia ran at the same speed — 1,600 revolutions per minute — for eighty minutes up to 2,000 
lbs. per square inch, and came out of test in a perfect, highly-polished condition. Tt is very diffi- 
cult to run the temperature of a Magnolia-lined bearing up to a destructive point. 

Every civilized country of the world has contributed its quota of testimonials regarding the 
splendid results obtained from using Magnolia Metal. If you are using "Genuine/' or any other 
bearing metal, we ask your careful consideration as to the merits of Magnolia. Magnolia is made 
of selected virgin materials of the best quality, which are still further cleaned, and graphite incor- 
porated into it. Magnolia is idealic in all of the good qualities that go to make an all-around 
first-class bearing metal. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

PRACTICAL ENGINEER POCKET 
BOOK, containing 680 pages, treating 
on 2,000 Engineering and Mechanical 
subjects, brought up to date. We 
offer this valuable reference work at 
40 cents, postage prepaid. 

Address Montreal Office 



SOLD BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE 
OR BY 

Magnolia Metal Co. 

225 St. Ambroise Street - MONTREAL 

New^York Chicago 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers, 



2$ 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The only Belting good enough for you is the belting that 
can be relied upon to stand up to the hardest work. That 
describes — 



LEATHER 




BELTING 



Why not join the large army of satisfied 
users who know by experience that " Climax " 
is absolutely reliable ? 

We guarantee every inch of "Climax." Write for Price List. 

WINNIPEG 

244 Princess St. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. 

89 Prince William St. 

VANCOUVER 

FULL STOCKjAT ALL' PLACES. 217 Columbia Av e . 



MONTREAL 

511 William St. 

TORONTO 

27 Helinda St. 





The Machine that docs it. 



"SPOT WELDING" or 
Riveting Without Rivets 

HOW IT'S DONE 

Q Take two pieces of sheet metal, lay one across the 

other on the lower die. 
Q Pull the lever arm shown on the head oi the 

machine. 
Q This forces the upper die down until the metal 

is clamped between the upper and lower die. 
Q Touch the switch, and quick as a fldsh the weld is 

made. 
Q Lightning in a condensed form is what does it. 
(| The electricity goes through the sheet iron and 

fuses the metal at a point or spot the size of a 

rivet. Welds it right and tight. 
Q That's why it's called "spot" or "point ' welding. 
CI NO PREPARATION OF STOCK NECESSARY. 
Q No projections or holes to punch, 
Q Saves the operations of punching and inserting 

rivets. 
Q BETTER AND STRONGER THAN RIVETING. 
Q We make over twenty different kinds of electric 

welding machines. 

The Catalogue tells about them, and it's yours for the asking. 

The'Toledo" Electric Welder Co. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



29 



THE 

LANCASHIRE 
DYNAMO AND 
MOTOR CO., Ltd 


152-4 Bay Street, Toronto 




Motors and 
Generators 

for 

all purposes 











More Power at Less Cost ! 

Here's a proposi- 
tion to diminish 
working costs that 
must surely appeal 
to YOU ! 

Will you investi- 
gate the merits of 

WEBSrER 

Feedwater Beater, 
Purifier and Filter? 

It makes use of 
a 1 1 con lensations 
and was te steam, 
and will positively 
rid your boiler of 
scale 'by removing 
a 1 1 scale-forming 
elements from your feedwater. Using pure water 
means getting every ounce of power out of your 
boiler with a smaller amount of fuel. 

Our descriptive literature has many points of 
interest for you! Send for it TO-DAY. 

DARLING BROS., LIMITED 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 

Vancouver, B.C., Frank Darling, Agent 




DON'T PAY FOR BELTS YOU CAN'T USE— You do not have to cut out and waste short 
lengths of belt every time slack is taken up, if you are using 



Goodhue Belts 



If your 
dealer 
doesn't 
stock our 
Belts 
write us 
for prices 



Because these belts stretch less by 15% to 25% than any others. 

This happy result is obtained by extra care given to the 
stretching of the belt, and by the exclusion of all unstretched 
parts in the make-up. 

According to the conditions in which the belt has to be 
used, we recommend our "Extra," "Standard" or "Acme 
Waterproof" Belts. Guaranteed reliable and economical. 

WRITE US TO-DAY 



J. L. GOODHUE & CO., Limited 



DANVILLE, P. Q. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



30 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Time and O Al/m Hose and 



Air SAVED 



Compressed Air Wflf LU Money 

BY USING 

IMPERIAL BLOW GUNS 




MADE IN CANADA 



Canadian RAND Co., Limited 

Commercial Union Building, Montreal, Que. 

HALIFAX TORONTO COBALT ELK LAKE WINNIPEG 
ROSSLAND VANCOUVER 



A Practical Machine That 
Cuts and Threads Pipe 




It makes no difference whether the pipe is 
long or short, in a trench, or in an open 
space, you can take the Forbes to the job, 
saving carting and labor. 

Catalog ? 

The Curtis <& Curtis Co. 

36 Garden Street, BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



STEEL CASTINGS 

By the TROPENAS CONVERTER PROCESS 

The above process is used by the leading Open Hearth steel foundries 
of Great Britain and the United States for small castings, as it gives a 
superior casting, true to pattern and of the highest grade of steel. We 
have the most modern and best equipped foundry in Canada for 
handling small steel castings up to four hundred pounds weight. 

High Grade Grey Iron Castings and 

Pattern Work 

Parker Foundry Company, Limited 



STEEL FOUNDRY 
27 TANSLEY ST. 



MONTREAL 



GREY IRON FOUNDRY 
18-27 DALHOUSIE ST. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



3i 



Renold Patent Silent Chain Drives 

MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY HANS RENOLD, Ltd., MANCHESTER, ENG. 

Maintain an efficiency of 98.2/per cent.,5and!compared 'with^maximunv, efficiency of high grade 

belts, effect a continual savingj ofj power. ^kj 



C 

"2 

c 



o 
o 

s 

c 

CO 

■3 






2 

O 

> 

n> 
o 

(V 
Cl 

a 1 

X 

o 


3 
•a 

0) 
w 
w 



A motor driving two blowers, in motion, one with air vessel, the other without. The one to the right without air vessel 
is fitted with a spring cushion sprocket. Note the smooth running. 



This chain con- 
sists of : 

Plates with 
working an- 
gles ground 
true 

Hardened seg- 
mental bush- 
ings. 

Hardened 

, shouldered 

Bstuds, which 

are free td 

[ rotate. 

Washers. 

Centre- Guiding 
Plates. 




ABSOLUTELY 
RELIABLE 

The friction comes on tempered 
and lubricated hard-steel surfaces, 
while the bearing surface is the 
maximum possible in chain con- 
struction. The pin revolving inside 
the bushings providing an even 
distribution of wear at each point 
and prevents stretch. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

and particulars of drives we have 
now running in your neighborhood. 



1 Showing Patent Bearings of the Renold Silent C^ain 
land giving" General Construction.^ .:.-*. . 



JONESpk GLASSCO = MONTREAL 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The True Weight of Things 

on 

Fairbanks Scales 




Counting Scale for Storekeepers 
and Automatic Machinery — Bolt, 
Nuts, Rivets, Washers, etc. 



Dormant Scale for Foundries, Machine 
Shops, Smith Shops. 



Wheelbarrow Scales for Power House' 
and General Shop Use 



What's Doing in Your Shop? 

THESETHREE 
FAIRBANKS SCALES 
WILL TELL YOU 

No chance for an error will exist if you provide WEIGHT CHECKS 
on the different operations your product undergoes. Shrinkage and 
losses from stock improperly cut affect costs to a large extent. Can 
you state what per cent, of shrinkage you have to contend with ? 
Decide now to get evidence of QUANTITY our new scale Catalogue 
No. 11 will tell you the best scale to use. Send for it. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Company, Limited 



MONTREAL 



Fairbanks Scales —Fairbanks-Morse Gas Engines — Safes and Vaults 
TORONTO ST. JOHN. N.B. WINNIPEG SASKATOON CALGARY VANCOUVER 






The advertiser -would like to know where you saw his advertisement- — tell him. 



Modern Machine Tool Practice for Maximum Production 



By Gordon C. Keith 

The Past Few Years Have Scot Great 'Advances Made in Machine Tool Practice. The Whole 
Line of Machine Tools Were Rc-dcsigncd so that High-speed Steels Could be Used to Their 
Full Capacity. It was then Necessary to Devise Equipment for Keeping the Machines in 
Operation the Greatest Percentage of Working Hours. In Other Words, it was Necessary 
to Cut Time Between Cuts. This Paper, Read Before the Central Railway and Engineering 
Club, Toronto, Dec. 20, 1910, Shows the Development of Machine Tools, and Also the Devices 
Designed in Order That Time Between Cuts May be Reduced to a Minimum and that Maxi- 
mum Production May be Obtained. 



-d 



Since the introduction of high speed 
steels and motor drive, there has been 
such a revolution in machine tool de- 
sign that it is only now that the pre- 
sent status of machine tool practice 
may be definitely defined. A complete 
redesign of machine tools has been 
necessitated and all the changes made 
and new methods adopted have had the 
one object in view, viz. that of obtain- 
ing maximum production. 

The starting point in obtaining maxi- 
mum production has been the proper 
care of tools. In a number of Cana- 
dian shops it has been recognized, as it 
has also been in United States shops, 
that a central tool room with a man 
in charge is a large factor in securing 
maximum production- The shapes and 
sizes of lathe tools, boring cutters, 
chisels, the method of forging and 
treating the tools should be standard- 
ized as should also all shop equipment, 
clamping bolts, wrenches, etc. Even in 
the smaller shops, such as that of the 
Toronto Street Railway and other rail- 
road repair shops, it has been found 
to pay to have one man grinding all 
the tools and have charge of the tool 
room. All carelessness with tools and 
ignorance in the selection of tools for 
certain work is eliminated by having 
the tools prepared and selected in ad- 
vance, and kept in good shape, thus 
assisting in securing maximum produc- 
tion. 

Probably the best illustration of a 
central tool room is that of the United 
States Navy Department, located at 
League Island, Philadelphia, Pa., for 
supplying the Atlantic Coast Navy 
yards. Standard chemical and physical 
specifications for high speed steel have 
been adopted. The plant has a capac- 
ity of 800 tools per day, and consists 
of a forge shop, treating department of 
chemical and physical test, together 
with the apparatus necessary for pro- 
ducing standard tools of the highest 
quality at minimum cost. Tools are 
made in such quantities as to ensure 
economical manufacture, and are car- 
ried in stock. 

The apparatus necessary and the me- 
thods of using it as followed in the 
forging plant, are compiled on instruc- 



tion charts, one of which is shown in 
Fig. 1. This covers the forgiing of 
straight round-nose roughing tools, 
right or left hand, giving the necessary 
dimensions and graphic instructions for 
using the applicances. 

The enormous railway mileage in 
Canada and the United States has re- 
sulted in great advances being made in 
railway shop equipment and a state- 
ment of what is. being accomplished with 
modern machine tools and high speed 
steels in the shops should prove of in- 
terest. A few years ago six pairs of 
car wheels per day was tho maximum 
production. Machine tools have since 
been brought to a constantly high 
state of efficiency until the best lathes, 
of five years ago, averaged about twelve 
pairs per day. Within the past two 
or three years this output has been 
steadily increased by improvements in 
design and methods of handling until at 
the present time many railroads are 
equipped with lathes turning out from 
sixteen to twenty pairs of 36-inch stan- 
dard make wheels in ten hours. 

Record Production. 

On May 11, 1910, a detailed record 
was kept on tire turning on a Niles- 
Bement-Pond wheel lathe at the West 
Albany shops of the New York Central 
& Hudson River Railroad. It will be 
noted in Fig. 2, that thirty-three pairs 
of 36-inch wheels were turned in 9 
hours and 53 minutes, being an average 
of 17 minutes and 58 seconds per pair. 

Wheel lathes were gradually increased 
in weight and power until it was finally 
found that the wheels and axles them- 
selves were the weak point in tho turn- 
ing operation. Recognizing this fact 
Small & McXaughton brought out 
twenty years ago a design of a machine 
to overcome this difficulty. This lathe 
was at that time a radical departure 
from ordinary design. The turning of 
axles on centres was abandoned, the 
entire axle journal being received dn 
the head by means of a split bush made 
to fit the axle and having its exterior 
turned taper. This eliminated the ob- 
vious weakness and hence springing of 
the centre and its projecting spindle. 
It held the axle rigidly close up to the 



__ — „ j^-, «„ — ,. . .__ ._...,, rj. — , _ — , 

wheel. The old form of wheel lathe 
was driven from one end and the power 
carried across the machine by a long 
shaft. This put an inevitable amount 
of torsion and lack of rigidity between 
the point at which the power was ap- 
plied and the wheel to be turned at the 
other end of the axle, and it -was found 
to be one serious source of vibration 
and chatter. So to overcome this diffi- 
culty the Small & McNaughton design 
was driven by a large spinal gear in 
the centre, having a gap through which 
the axle could be rolled. The power 
from the large central drive was fur- 
nished to each wheel through face 
plates. The outside spindles support- 
ing the axle were also provided with 
face plates and chucks, hence the wheels 
were clamped rigidly between two 
staunch face plates driven from one and 
chucked by the other ; thus the wheels 
were held with absolute rigidity and 
became, in fact, one with the machine 
itself. 

On a modern wheel lathe no attention 
is paid to the hard skin of the tire 
caused by friction of the wheels and 
brake shoes, for the simple reason that 
the tool is put diirectly under this scale 
and a heavy roughing cut can be fed 
across in eight or nine minutes. After 
that, a finishing tool is used the full 
width and shape of the tire and fed 
directly in without any use of cross- 
feed, a third tool the shape of the flange 
finishing the operation. The increased 
output of modern lathes, comes from 
their great weight and power and im- 
proved facilities for handling and get- 
ting the wheels in and out of the lathe, 
and from the higher quality tool steel. 

After the capacity of the wheel lathe 
got up to twenty or more pairs of 
wheels a day. the manual labor of 
clamping and unelamping the cutting 
tools became quite a serious matter for 
the operator, and a number of devices 
have been brought out to lighten and 
quicken this operation. The limit of 
human endurance comes into the pro- 
blem and here clamping and unclamp- 
iog, if it had to be done with a wrench 
on say twenty pairs of wheels per day. 
it would mean 350 to 400 manipulations 
in ten hours. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



One device that has been brought out 
is in the form of a turret tool-holder 
which has the roughing and finishing 
tools set in it, the holder being rotated 
to bring the various forms into action 

Another device is a pneumatic clamp 
by which the operator simply opens a 
compressed air valve and clamps his 
tool by power. In this arrangement the 
air cylinder is built in the body of tool 
rest ; the piston carries a wedge which, 
operating between two rollers, forces 
up the long end of the clamping lever. 
Thus the operator is relived from sev- 
eral hundred strenuous muscular exer- 
tions leaving him more efficient to at- 
tend to the actual turning operations. 

Sellers' 42-in. Car-wheel Lathe. 

The Williams Sellers Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa., have developed a 42-in. car- 
wheel lathe, which illustrates what ma- 
chine tool builders are accomplishing tin 
the way of production in the railroad 
shop. It has been pointed out above, 
that a lew years ago ten pairs per day 
was considered a good record. The 
rate has been constantly increased until 
an average of twenty minutes per pair 
has been obtained. This exemplifies the 
economies in railrod shop machine tool 
practice that have recently been brought 
about. 

For the test of the Sellers lathe three 
pairs of 36-inch steel-tired wheels, se- 
lected at random from a large number 
shipped to the machine builders' plant 
by the Reading Railroad Co., were 
turned in an average of about 20 min- 
utes per pair, including setting ma- 
chinery and taking out of lathe. The 
actual time that the machine was in 
operation averaged about 18 minutes 
per pair, and 90 per cent, of the total 
time required represents the period 
that the machine was doing effective 
work. 

The cut and feed during the test was 
I -inch each, taken at a speed of from 
15 to 19 feet per minute. The time 
taken from floor to floor of a pair of 
wheels, as well as the other details of 
the test, are given in the following 
table : 



Anthony of the Reading shops of the 
Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. 

In these tests the final finish was re- 
markably fine. There was not a trace 
of chatter to be found, and the sur- 
faces of the t leads were tree from those 



flange. The tread and flango tool is 
then forced in, taking a broad smooth 
cut, and leaving the surface in excellent 
condition, already noted. Then comes a 
similar tool for cutting the taper at 
the outer edge of the taper and round 



Instruction Chart 



PRSB PRSC 
PRBB PRBC 
For Forging Standard Straight Round Nose Roughing Tools PRWB PRWC 



PRSC 
FKBC 




T.JM 






M 



i •> 



Second Operation - Forging the Nose 
Preparation 

1. ITace Tool, Id Purnace. 

2. Heat «lo»lj to Parglne Btat ( 1800° P.) 

Bar u> a* hMUd "X ' Iucum bwk from end (See Table) 
1 Bare all Tools read/. 
Bending. Drawing down Heel aud Straightening 

1. Put Bendlnr. Die oo Aoru. 

2. Put Tool In Die ud drier down 1 See Skrtcbw -HsE-1 







3. K.-m.-.i t Tool ir. I Die 

4. Flatten Side* at bend. ( See Skewh "F"l 
6 I". - ■: * r. H««l , See Skctcbea -G * B" > 






C. Sr-algbtei 

7, Stnifh tei 

Is the Til 

Who. On 

•.outlier. 



Bottom , Sea Sketch ' J' - ) 
From and spread Nose (o WJdtl 
ie- (8w8kitcb "K") F*pr*i r 
Tool i; removed f rom. Fur aiet r 

Tool* Required 
Bending Pie 
Fuller Bar 
Temp 



First Operation - Cut to Length and Stamp 

Preparation 

1. Placa Marking tod Cutting Gap on Hammer. 

2. Set Stop tu lengtb of Too. »> .nuked on Angle Iron. 

3. Place Oat, In FunviM t See Table -V) 

4. lice, aloeij to Forflnr Beat ( 1H0° P.) 

Cut-off and Stamp 

). Wltbdne- Bar from Furnace. 

2. Cut-off y\tc In Gage ( ace Sketcb -A") 
Stop ptaoed at point ^\ Bammer / 

Je»i(Ti*icd for th« aim Chisel Carrier - 

or Ten) beloi n 




BMtkBfrv 

a Put Bar back tc beat far Beit Cut 
4. SUap the Place cut-off with ijroboi and Lot Number. 
(•jeeBkeUbei) ■■! s C") 
Shoeing Location of Stisdm) j,,^ £ B) j \M 



V . 1 :■?;.. 



B 



±) 



Up 




Repeal the tvnxo\ar until all piece* are Cut tc Lesrtb and Stamped. 
E*ob time a Bar la Worked up, place a New Bar In F\irM«c. 

Tools Required 

Marking and Cutting Oag* 
Tung* 



Third Operation - Finishing to Gage 

Preparation 

1. Plaoe Tool In Furnaca 

2. Oealilcalj to renting Best ( 1800° F.) 
Z. H*tc all Tools read;. 

Trim and Offset Nose to Gage 

1. Withdraw T-xil from Fire. 

2. Mark off Bel£bi "B" with $Br Height Ga*' (Sec Sketoh ■■X") 
X Cut Baca Slope and Bide Step* roueblr { about ■>, Inch bt|bor 

than ."inlebed Htitbt ) >e* Sketch "M" 
00°Uelgbl Qagc - /TY«i^_ o_._a.. n\ su4 f— 

Make Mi 




•L Trim Ncae to Sbape. Finish Cut. t See Sketch "N") 
;.. OTset to suit Limit Ga^e < &** Bkrtohaa • P 4 B ') Keep 
Las' of Tool straight. 

r Tootf ever I i 1^ 

i Shank boU tbe Tool's 

ISteain Hm 




^r 




Teetlnr, Clearance Angle 
S I "lib Con* Oat. 
G. Te«t Clearance Awrlr, Back and Side Slope altb Cone and Limit 
Oiees ( See SItet;bei --R s 8") Erpeat for aU Tool*. WLen One 
Toel !■ rtmo r cd rrom rnmaoe replaoe »lth anotfier. 
loola Reqoired 

Cbierl I Stralcbt ) Cbleel (Bent) 

' R1;M Hand. PRS B- 1*RBB- PRWB 
Leti Band, PKSOPRBCPRWC 
t Oag'- Jtl u BclKbt Oage 

Platter. Tone> 



. ..av. 



Fig. 1— Forging Instruction Chart used in Contra] Tool Department of l.S. Navy Yards. 



fine cracks extending down into the 
metal that are so characteristic of sur- 
faces from which metal has been re- 
moved in heavy cuts at high speeds. 
The reproductions of photographs of 
these surfaces taken first after roughing 
and then after the finish in? cut, show 
the effect very clearly. 



No. 1 

Diam. wheel finished 342 

Diam. Wheel rough 35> 

TVIin. Sec 

Floor to chuck 1 5 

Turning 17 % 

Machine to floor 1 2 

Total time 1!) 47 

(Jutting Bpeed ft. inin 1") and 



Engine 
No. 2. No. 3. truck whls. 
in. 34 3 L6 in. 34 11-16 in. 301 in- 
in. 34 15-16 in. :.-l | in. 

Min. Sec. Min. Sec.. Min. Sec. 
2 6 1 18 1 2 

16 2 18 17 13 55 

1 17 50 1 

L8 15 1!) 85 15 L5 

16 16 14 19 



Time to change from turning tender 
to engine truck wheels, 6 min. 1 sec. 

The operation of the machine during 
these tests was in the hands of William 



The method of procedure is the usual 
one. The wheels are set in position 
and the roughing tool made to take a 
cut across the tread and top of the 



the corner of the rim. This done, the 
wheels are finished. 

The car wheel is driven by a motor 
set down on the extension of the bed. 
The lathe is an example of the applica- 
tion of individual motor drive to ma- 
chine tools. Exhaustive tests have been 
made so that the machine tool builder 
has now no difficulty in selecting the 
proper power of motor for machiroing 
various materials for various combina- 
tions of speeds, feeds and depth of cut. 
Individual motor drive has been adopted 
in a large number of railway shops, 
machines of smaller capacities' being ar- 
ranged in groups and driven from a 
line shaft by one motor. 

Sellers' Driving Wheel Lathe. 

The high power wheel turning lathe 
for locomotive driving wheels shown in 
Fig. 9 is a result of the makers of ma- 
chine tools trying to raise their capac- 
ities up to the cutting possibilities of 
high-speed steel. The .lathe shown has 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



a swiing of 90 inches. It is estimated 
that when the tool is cutting f in. deep 
with £-in. feed the pressure at the point 
is about 55,000 lbs. Such a cut is 
readily made at a speed of 16 feet per 
minute, which requires 880,000 ft. lbs. 
per minute or nearly 27 h.p. at the 
point of the tool. To do this and avoiid 
chattering the machine has been rigidly 
constructed. The device is obtained by 
wieans of dogs fastened at the rim or 
tire. The dog has a gripping shoe "A" 
shown in Fig. 11, and the pointed arm 
has a set screw "13". The arm swing* 
up between the spokes of the wheel and 
'the two grips come in line with the 
two faces of the tire. The set screw 
"B" is then turned in with a heavy 
wrench until its point has penetrated 
the metal and the shoe "A" has a firm 
grip. This shoe "A" is held in line and 
in place by the sides of the holding 
bracket, but the set screw "B" has a 
slight swinging motion. When the lathe 
is started, the shoe "A" drives the 
wheel through the tire, but if there be 
any slip the set screw "B" hangs back 
with the tire and in so doing gets out 
•of alignment with "A". The slotted 
5iole in the dog makes this possible, 
; and as this lessens the distance between 
"""A"' and "B" the former is drawn into 
the metal of the tire, tightening the 
grip. When this grip exceeds the thrust 



of the tool, the tire will turn and the 
cutting proceed. 

In testing the lathes, the cutting wan 
limited to a speed of 13 ft. per minute, 
with a cut and feed of i-in., but it can 
be speeded to 25 ft. per minute and re- 
move the same amount of metal, but 



in which the lathe was se.t complete 
for turning wheels of 78 inches diame- 
ter with 6£ in. tires in 12 rminutes, in- 
cluding the placing of the wheels in 
position for work. They were then fin- 
ished complete in 19 minutes and placed 
on the floor in four minutes more. The 




Fife'. 3— William Sellers & Co. 42-in. Car Wheel Lathe. 



the high speed steels will not stand the total time from floor to floor, including 



strain and heat. With a f in. cut and 
£-in. feed the tool and the metal it is 
cutting, are at a red heat at the point 
of contact. 
A demonstration was recently made 



the setting of the lathes, was 35 min- 
utes. This work was the same as the 
turning off of a new set of tires and the 
cut was but i~in. deep. 
In another test, a pair of 67 inch 



DATA OF TEST OF NILES-BEMENT-POND CAR-WHEEL LATHE. 

Pond 42-inch motor-driven car-wheel lathe 
At West Albany Car Shops, N.Y.C. & H.R. R.R. 36-inch Krupp and Paige wheels, 

May 11, 1910. 
Continuous Run from 7 a.m. until 5.53 p.m., one hour for nooning. 

Pair No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Average. 

Putting in lathe 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 322 min., 28 sec. 

Roughing 11 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 11 10 10 9 min., 23 sec. 

Finishing 5 6 4 3 5 4 6 4 7 5 5 5 min., 7 sec. 

Taking out 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 min., sec. 

Time from floor to floor.. 20 17 16 16 17 16 18 17 21 19 18 17 min., 58 sec. 

Depth of cut i ft 3-16 J 3-16 J J 3-16 3-16 i 3-16 3-16 inch. 

Feed 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 inch. 

Speed 16 16 17 15 14 12 33 18 12 14 15 14.4 feet. 

Pair No 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Average. 

Putting in lathe 2 4 2 2 2 4 3 2 2 3 32 min., 28 sec 

Roughing 9 11 12 8 9 8 10 8 9 9 11 9 min.. 23 sec. 

Finishing 5 5 8 4 5 4 6 7 5 5 6 5 min., 7 sec 

Taking out 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 min., sec. 

Time from floor to floor.. 17 21 23 15 17 17 20 18 17 18 21 17 min., 58 see. 

Depth of cut 4 3-16 $ i 3-16 3-16 A ! | 3-16 3-16 3-16 inch. 

Feed 13-32 13-32 5-16 13-32 13-32 13-32 3-32 13-32 13-32 3-32 3-32 13-32 inch. 

Speed 15 13 10 14 12 15 11 12 10 14 12 14.4 feet. 

Pair No 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Average. 

Putting in lathe 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 33 11 2 min., 28 'sec. 

Roughing 9 11 9 10 7 10 9 10 10 7 10 9 min., 23 sec. 

Finishing 5 6 5 6 5 6 5 4 3 5 5 5 min., 7 sec. 

Taking out 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 min., sec. 

Time from floor to floor.. 17 21 17 19 16 20 18 18 17 14 17 17 min., 58 sec. 

Depth of cut i 3-16 | § 3-16 } 3-16 3-16 I 3-16 \ 3-16 inch. 

Feed 13-32 13-3213-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 13-32 inch. 

Speed 14 13 11 14 20 15 17 17 16 21 18 14.4 feet. 

Average time for turning, 17 min., 58 sec. Total time for 33 pairs. 9 hours, 53 min. 

Pig. 2— Table Showing Test of Niles-Bement-Pond Wheel Lathe. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



wheels with fi} in. tires were chucked 
in 7 min.. turning complete in 28 min., 
and put on the floor in 3 minutes more, 
or a total of 38 min. from floor to 
floor. Jr. this ease the cut was i! in. 
deep. 

A third test was made with 07 in. 
wheels and (> { in. tires. They wen 



and eeonmically worn or turned piston 
rods, valve yoke stems, axles and other 
parts. A orane may be attached for 
handling axles, piston rods and other 
heavy work. 

brills for Maximum Production. 
At the convention of the American 
Railwaj Master Mechanics' and Master 



vating screw as well, which it is claim- 
ed prevents the slightest spring. A 
very quick adjustment is obtained with 
this table. A large chip pan is provid- 
at each end, as well as an otil groove 
tunning lengthwise at each side, ar- 
ranged so that all the lubricant run- 
ning into the chip pan at the farther 




Si r\ 

1 


fcr^fl 




p^^^p^H J1BB 

L 








Fig. 4 -Worn Wheel taken from Ser- Fig. 5 First Operation Completed, Fig. 6 — Next Tool has Roughly Fig. 
Mounted in Cfauck. Depth of Cut Averaged %-In. Formed Flange and Taken off 

Large Corners. 



-Condition of Wheel at end 
of cut of Third Tool. 



chucked in 9 min. and finished in 43 
min , the breaking of a tool having de- 
layed the work four minutes. The work 
done at a cutting speed of from 
13 to 15 ft. per min. When a tool steel 
is produced that can stand the stress 
and heat of a higher speed no doubt 
there will be a greater output than 
modern machine tool practice will 
allow. 

Landis Grinder. 

Fig. 15 illustrates work done on the 
Landis Universal Grinder, which is 
built for use in the railroad tool room 
or repair shops. This grinder grinds 
reamers, gauges, dies and boring bars. 
does straight or taper, external or in- 
ternal grinding and handles a large var 






Car Builders' Associations at Atlantic 
City last June, The Colburn Machine 
Tool Co., Franklin, Pa., exhibited a 
heavy duty drill that w : as of unusual 
interest, not only because of its eon- 
structural features, but also by reason 
of the results in the way of rapid drill- 
ing which it makes possible. An im- 
provement which ten Is to increase the 
usefulness of the tool is the new com- 
pound table. 

As will be noticed from Fig. 15 this 
table is very different from the ordinary 
type and is a valuable adjunct to the 
machine. The table has a working sur- 
face of 16x30 in. and is provided with 
a rapid movement of 20 in. longitudin- 
ally and 8 in. transversely through 




end is drained back through a cored 
opening in the table to the pan nearer 
the supply tank. 

The machine is built on the unit sys- 
tem, that is, the speed changing me- 
chanism is in one separate box, the 
feed change £<' ars arc enclosed in an- 
other separate case, and the head is 
a third unit entirely independent of the 
other parts. 

In a series of tests made using Celfor 
high speed twist drills, cutting speeds 
us high as 200 ft. per min. in cast iron 
were obtained, although 125 to 150 ft. 
per min. were used in most cases, 
which was undoubtedly due to the fact 
that the nature of the work was the 
limiting factor rather than the drill or 
the machine itself. 

Wheel Lathe. 

Fig. IP) shows a modern 90 inch wheel 
lathe built by the London Machin ■ Tool 




Wneel Beady for Service. 



Fig. 10 Wheel in Position. 



Fig. 11 Driving Dog. 



Fig. 12- Taking a Houghing Cut. 



iety of grinding on small parts such as 
knuckle pin-, and cross head pins, link 
blocks and plates, parts of air valves, 
etc., with speed and accuracy. The Gap 
grinder is also a railroad tool, a gap 
aloni? the bed adapting it to a variety 



worms and racks. The operator stand- 
ing directly in front of the table can 
manipulati h forward or back or long- 
itudinally without moving from his 
position. Springing is eliminated, and 
the table is supported by a heavy 



of work and permits grinding accurately bracket or knee underneath and an ele- 



Co Hamilton, and installed in the G. 
T. R. shops at Stratford. 

The face plates are very heavy and 
massive, 91 inch diameter, and have 
bolted to them an internal gear of wide 
face anl coarse pitch. 

The construction of the drive is such 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



that the long bottom shaft is relieved 
to a considerable extent of the heavy 
torsion which invariably causes chatter 
on this class of machinery. 

Clutches and change gears are provid- 
ed, giving- a wide range of speeds for 
all wheels from 34 inch to 84 inch on 
the tread. 



The feed mechanism is of the link 
type, designed so as to give 8 impulses 
of feed per revolution of the face plate. 

Tho bottom rests arc moved hlong 
the bed by means of rack and pinion, 
and have extension to allow the cross 
rest to move in sufficiently alone for 
small wheels. 



The travelling head is the striking 
feature of this ma'hine, and its great 
value is very apparent, especially on 
massive jobs where the work cannot be 
readily moved. This construction also 
makes it possible to do work requiring 
a great reach. This construction at 
first hand is criticised on account of 
the spring of head under heavy work. In 
actual practice this spi'.'ng is found to 
be very small, owing to the fact that 




Fig-. Ki --JiO-in. Wheel Lathe, London Machine Tool Co., Haniiltoi 



Fig-. 14 — Work Finished on a Grinder. 



The rests are exceptionally nassive, 
having power feed across the tiead, 
varying from 4-25-in. per revolution to 
12-25 in. per revolution. 




Fig-. 15— Colburn High-duty Drill. 



The left hand head is driven in and 
out by means of reversing pulleys act- 
ing through gears into a screw placed 
under the centre of gravity of head. 

The drivers on this machine confist 
of four sets of adjusting steel blocks, 
having serrated edge gouging into the 
outside of tire. Powerful bolts are pro- 
vided for slipping through the arm of 
the wheel, and drawing the whe-jl back 
against the' face plate. This tiiakds the 
win-el practically one with a heavy face 
plate, giving great rigidity. On a ma- 
(line wi'.th this drive cuts 1 inch deep, 
and 7-16 inch feed have been taken. 

Traveling Head Slotters. 

In the design of the traveling head 
slutter, Pig. 17, the London Machine 
Tool Co. have taken of the experience 
of many of the largest users of slotters 
in the country, particularly in railroad 
shops where the heaviest service is re- 
quired. Weak spots have been elimin- 
ated, many conveniences have been 
added, simplifications made in construc- 
tion, and an excellent machine produc- 
ed 



the upward thrust is taken by two mas- 
sive long bolts running clear through 
and anchored in base, and also the col- 
umn is made very deep and heavy and 
the head being well scraped thereto 
makes spring practically negligible. 
The quick power adjustment to head 
and table can be thrown in and out, 




Fig:. 13 Tools for Turning Tire! 
Wheel Lathe. 



Sellers 



while the head is running or standing. 
as desired. The quick power feature on 
tin classes of work means an in- 
crease of 200 p.c. in output. By this 
feature, as a general proposition, this 
machine will do 50 p.c. more work than 
was formerly possible. The quick re- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 





Fie; IT Ti iveliug Head si. .tier. 



Fig. IS— 42-in. Coach Wheel Lathe. 





I!) Double Axle Lathe. London Machine Tool Co., Hamilton 



Fig. 20 — Double Front Geared High-speed Engine Lathe. John 
Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas. 





21 Bertram 2-gpiudle Drilling Machine. 



Pig. 22 Bertram 4-bead Locomotive Frame Drilling Machine. 



turn is ol Bpeeial const] g Tool Co , Hamilton, for turning out rail- 

remarkablj even cutting strokes with waj coach wheels at a maximum rate. 

mi. An indicator is at- The driving mechanism consists of 

cached showing amount ol strokes. two lace plates, 5(<-in. diameter, and 

The 42" coach wheel lathe shown in Fig having open cut in same on one jidi 

18 is designed by the London Machine to admit of axle. 



The centre head supporting the two 
internal gears, has a wide bearing on 
the base, and is secured to base by 
heavy bolts and dowels, making an ex- 
ceptionally rigid construction. The 
method of taking insert is very simple, 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



there being merely two screws to 
loosen up, and the section driven out. 
On account of the shape of the gear 
ring it makes an exceptionally rigid 
construction, by which there is no vi- 
bration. 

To the face plates are secured drivers 
of the latest approved form, giving 
ample driving capac'ty to the machine. 

The tailstocks have spindles of large 
diameter, to which are secured very 
powerful self-centering chucks for grip- 
ping the wheels. 

The heads are adjustable in and out 
for a distance of 12 inches, and are 
opened by means of screws operated by 
motors on each end. These motors do 
not require to be over 2 h.p. capacity 
each. 

The cross slides and rest are extreme- 
ly massive, and are provided with 
means for quickly releasing tool and se- 




Fig. 23 — Slotter Arranged for Machining Links 



curing it in position. U" x 3" tool 

steel should lie used. 

The feeds are 4 in number, and vary 
from 3-25ths to 12-25ths of an inch per 
revolution, which is ample for the work 
required. 

The advantage of this machine is that 
the power is transmitted entirelj 
through the gear, and bearing has only 
a steadying action — it has no trans 
mitting function. 

The heads are moved backwards and 
forwards by power which relieves the 
attendant of much incidental trouble. 

The tool post is of a very powerful 
type, and is operated by large screw of 
coarse pitch and having differential 
threads and requiring a minimum of 
energy and friction. 

Double Axle Lathe. 

The double axle lathe shown on Fig. 
19 is a very heavy and powerful ma- 





Fig. 24 — Machining Links on a Planer. 



Fig. 25— Horizontal Milling Machine. 





Fig. 26— Driving Wheel Lathe. 



Fig. 28 — Cylinder Boring Machine. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 











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Fig. 29- Bertram Quartering Machine. 



Fig. 30 — Newton Horizontal Miller. 



chine, designed for the rapid turning of 
car and locomotive axles. 

The carriages are of the double type, 
having steel gearing and automatic 
throwout. 

There are three changes of feed in- 
stantly obtained without stopping the 
machine. These feeds can be varied 
within wide range if desired. 

The centre driving head has an open- 
ing of 13 inch diameter, and is driven 
by powerful gears of wide face and 
coarse pitch, and is provided with 
equalizing drivers. 

For motor drive, a variable speed 
motor having a speed \ariation of 3 to 
1, of from 15 to 30 h.p., depending on 
the class and quantity of work requir- 
ed, is used. If belt driven this machine 
is driven by a C-inch belt, having 3 
Btep cone of large diameter, cone be- 
ing 24 inches. 

Bertram Tools. 

Fig. 20 shows a 30 inch double back 
geared high speed engine lathe, built by- 



dent rod and screw feeds, power cross- 
feed, compound rest, plain tool block, 
quick change screw cutting gear from 
steel and two steady rests. It is driven 




PISTON TRAVEL 4 

:, srftisw 

^SOuSTo STOCK 
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Fig. 



-Peterson Pneumatic Toolholder on 
Bertram Car Wheel Lathe. 



by a 10 h.p. motor and has a speed of 
400 to 600 r.p.m. 

The back gears are on the front of 
the lathe and are really front gears. It 



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smooth cut. This feature is typical of 
modern practice. 

The two spindle drilling machines 
shown in Fig. 21 has spindles 3 inch in 
diameter, with 18^ in. traverse and 
three changes of speed. The heads are 
adjustable along the rail by hand or bv 
power. The saddles arc adjustable in 
and out 21 inches. The table is pro- 
vided with a trough for collecting drill 
fluid which drains to pump for circulat- 
ing. The range of spindle speeds is 
from 20 to 180 r.p.m. Heads and pump 
are motor driven. 

Fig. 22 shows a modern four-head 
Bertram drilling machine such as used 
in the modern locomotive shop for drill- 
ing locomotive frames. Three heads 
are used for vertical drilling and 
one swivels for ang-ular drilling-. 
Power is transmitted to the head 
by driving shaft the entire length, 
which in turn is operated by a belted 
20 h.p. constant speed motor driven 
countershaft at the end of the machine. 
Spindle ends are fitted for No. 5 Morse 
taper socketa. 

Modern Method of Machining Links. 

Two plans arc, adopted for machining 
reversing links. The Bertram slotter is 







.1 Boring Machine 



1 Tabor Spiral inserted Tooth Cutter. 



.lohn Bertram & Sons Co , Dunda 

use in locomotive work. It admits 15 
feet between centres. The swing is 32 
inches over shears, and 20$ in. over the 
carriage It is equipped with indepen- 



is therefore no longer necessary with 
such a lathe for a mechanic to turn 
the tool upside down on the back of the 
lathe to make a good cut. The front 
gears act directly on work giving 



shown in Fig. 23 and a planer attach 
ment for giving the links the correct 
curve is shown in Fig. 21. The slotting 
attachment is used on a 12-inch heavy 
slotting machine. The table is 30 inch 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



in diameter with 30 in. longitudinal 
and 24 inch transverse speeds. 

When used for slotting links the worm 
gear is unhitched and the table rotates. 
The device shown for planing links 
makes a perfect link. The construction 
of the jig will be readily seen from the 
illustration. 

Fig. 25 shows a modern horizontal 
milling machine for milling the channels 
and plates on side rods. In the machine 
shown the distance between housings is 
40^ in. The maximum distance from 
centre of spindle to table, 52 ins. Capac- 
ity to mill 14 ft. long. The spindle is 
5^ ins. in diameter and has four 
changes of speed, fitted with taper 
socket 3Jj ins. in diameter at its large 
end. 

Bertram Driving Wheel Lathe. 

Fig. 26 shows a 100 in. new model 
Bertram driving wheel lathe with a 
capacity for 86 inch wheels. The swing 
over the bed is 102 (inches. Maximum 
distance between centres is 9 ft. Swing 
over the carriage is 96 inches. On the 
pedestals are mounted two compound 
rests with tool blocks fitted with a 
patent single screw tool holder. The 
feed mechanism gives four changes of 
feed to one revolution of drive. Driving 
pinions are steel cut from the solid. 
The face plates are provided with 
pockets, to receive crank pins and each 
is equipped with four Teas' Patent 
Sure-grip Drivers. 

Tailstock or movable head provided 
with quick power traverse by 7^ h.p. 
motor. Carriages are of box construc- 
tion and extend the full width of the 
bed so that pedestals carrying tool 
blocks will have sufficient travel for 
boring wheel centres. When turning full 
diameters the rear portion of the saddle 
is detached which will permit wheels 
being taken out of the machine without 
changing the position of the carriage, 
it being only necessary to remove the 
tailstock to the rear sufficient to with- 
draw the crank pins from the faceplate. 
It is motor driven by a 50 h.p. D.C. 
variable speed motor 500-100 r.p.m. 
with a 7^ h.p. A.C. constant speed 
motor for traversing the head. 

The C.P.R. have successfully applied 
a pneumatic tool, designed by W. Pet- 
erson, of the C.P.R., Montreal, to Ber- 
tram lathes for turning car and truck 
wheels. In turning wheel tires it is 
necessary to change the tools three 
times for each tire and two men were 
required to operate the tools. With the 
tool shown, one man can operate them, 
-the necessary champing and <etti ng beine 
accomplished almost simultaneously. 

A two spindle Bertram cylinder bor- 
ing machine is shown in Fig. 28. It has 
a bed 19 ft. 7 inch long, 48 inches wide 
and 10 inches deep on which is an ad- 
justable table 57 inches long, 53 inches 
wide, having power traverse along the 



bed. When in working position it sup- 
ports the outer end of boring liars, and 
when removed to the end of the bed the 
cylinder is free of the bars and may be 
lifted without taking the bars off the 
machine. The large bar is 12 inches in 
diameter having horizontal adjustment 
from 15 inches to 32 inches, and 
is 24 inches from centre of bar to top 
of table. The small bar is 5 inches in 
diameter, with horizontal adjustment of 
14& inches, also a vertical adjustment 
from 9 to 31 inches. Diameter of head 
on 12 inch bar is 21 inches ; diameter 
of head on 5 inch bar is 11^ inches. 
Each bar has three changes of feed. 
Machine has four facing heads, two for 
each bar, smallest to face 20 inches in 
diameter and the largest 44 inches in 
diameter. It is motor driven by 15 h.p. 
D.C. 2 to 1 variable speed motor. 

Fig. 29 is a 100 inch locomotive driv- 
ing wheel quartering machine. It has a 
capacity for Wheels up to 90 inches in 
diameter on the tread, with from 10 
to 20 inch stroke. The heads have 
long bearing on a substantial bed and 
are adjustable- for axles of different 
lengths. These machines are built for 
either right or both right and left hand 
lead. Spindles are of large diameter 
and have 15 inch traverse. The saddles 
carrying same are graduated for easy 
adjustment to the desired stroke. 
Spindles have three changes of power 
feed and rapid hand movement. Axles 
are held on centres and on adjustable 
"V" bearings supporting by frames to 
which the wheels are securly clamped. 
The boring spindles are provided with 
outboard support and also with device 
for truing up crank pins. Each head is 
arranged with motor drive by a 5 
h.p. constant speed motor. 
Newton Machines. 

The horizontal milling machine shown 
on Fig. 30 was built by The Newton 
Machine Tool Co., Philadelphia, for the 
G.T.R. shops, Point St. Charles, and is 
adapted to the milling of locomotive 
rods. 

Installations of these millers at the 
Pittsburg works of the American Loco- 
motive Co. show that they are slabbing 
rods on cuts from 14 to 18 inches wide, 
§ to £-inch deep, at a table feed ad- 
vance of 8 inches per minute, and chan- 
neling two rods at one time, each chan- 
nel being 3£ inches wide and If inches 
deep in one operation, at the rate of 
2£ inches to 2£ inches per minute. These 
results have been accomplished by means 
of the Tabor helical spiral inserted 
tooth high speed milling cutter, as 
shown by Fig. 31. The average removal 
of metal is equivalent to one cubic inch 
per minute of horse power. 

Fig. 32 illustrates a new design of 
rod boring machine, with the additional 
adjustable support for the end of the 
spindles ; when supported in this man- 



ner a cup cutter is used to trepan the 
rods. This view was taken in the Jun- 
iata shops of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, and results show that 10£ inch 
diameter bores are made in rods 5-inch 
thick, in twenty (20) minutes, for which 
only a reaming cutter is necessary to 
finish. This method eliminates the 
necessity of drilling a pilot hole. Both 
holes are finished at the same time. 
Cut Time Between Cuts. 

In a recent address on shop efficiency 
given by E. P. Bullard, president of the 
Bullard Machine Tool Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn., he summed up the problem of 
reducing shop costs in the following 
terse sentence. "To cut shop costs, cut 
the time between cuts." 

As an example of the inefficiency re- 
sulting from not cutting time between 
cuts, he pointed out that in a prominent 
shop, after a difficult piece of work had 
been finished on a boring mill, it was 
necessary to wait from 10 a.m. to 3 
p.m. before a new forging was avail- 
able, the machine in the meantime lying 
idle. He also pointed out that a great 
deal of time is wasted in boring mill 
operations in adjusting the machine to 
the exact size required by the work and 
stated that a considerable time can be 
saved on machines equipped with mic- 
rometer dials which permit instant and 
accurate adjustment. 

W. R. Towne, president of the Yale & 
Towne Co., Stamford, Conn., states 
that by the use of scientific methods and 
automatic machinery, his company, 
within the past six years, had achieved 
increased output, decreased labor cost 
and increased wages to employes. 

In speaking with a superintendent of 
a large Hamilton plant recently he 
stated "Deliver tools to the men. Keep 
men busy. More time is lost in men 
looking for work than in actual pro- 
duction.'" In the G.T.R. shops, Strat- 
ford, this has been recognized, and in 
order that men may be kept busy, 
chasers have been appointed to keep the 
men supplied with the work. At first 
the men looked on the innovation with 
disfavor, but now they keep the chaser 
busy with requests for more work. 

With the development in machine 
tools and improved methods between 
operations, greater shop production is 
made possible. The foregoing by no 
means exhausts modern practice, but it 
points out a number of main features 
and describes a number of interesting 
tools now found in the machine shop. 
Various attachments and special ma- 
chines have also been devised. Perfec- 
tion is a hard thing to obtain, but man- 
ufacturers of machine tools, master 
mechanics, shop foremen and managers 
are on the right track, and with the 
progress that is being made it may not 
be very long before still greater out- 
puts will be possible. 



Experiments on Water Discharge from Short Nozzles 

By James Barr, B.Sc, and George Fax * 

The Results of a Series of Tests Conducted at the Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, by George 
Fax, Hare Been Taken up by James Fair, and Some I cry Instructive Inferences Drawn 
Therefrom. While the Treatment of the Subject is Largely Mathematical, the Forceful 
Manner in Which it is Placed Before the Reader Simplifies any Difficulties That Might . 
Otherwise Arise. The Mathematical Deductions Involved are Such as Arise in the Routine 
of Every Engineer who Attempts to Understand his Indicator Cards. In Addition, it Might 
be Said That the Advent of Water Wheels in Such Large Numbers Makes This Article Doubly 
Interesting as Adding to the Fund of Useful Hydraulic Information. 



IF wo have two variable quantities 
(x and yj connected by an equation of 
tlu> form y=Axn. where A and n are 
numerical constants, we shall obtain a 
Btraight line if we plot a graph show- 
in? the logarithms of x and >'"■ and from 
the position and slope of this line we 
can readily find the values of A and n. 

This device is often of great practical 
service, not only in obtaining the values 
of A and n. but also in showing graph- 
ically the true relation between the vary- 
ing quantities x and y. since the straight 
line can often be easily and accurately 
drawn. 

For example, it is generally supposed 
that if D be the discharge from an 
orifice, and II the head or pressure at 
the orifice D=A Hn where A and n have 
approximately constant values. 

Deductions. 

The accompanying table and diagram 
indicate the method of plotting the re- 
sults and deducing the equations. 

Let D be the discharge in Imperial 
gallons per minute and H the head or 
pressure at the nozzle in pds. per sq. 
inch. We see from the table that the 
values of D range from 37 to 364. and 
therefore log D varies from log 37 
(=1.568) to log 364 (=2.561). The 
values of H range from 30 to 200, and 
therefore log II varies from log 30 
(=1.477) to log 206 (=2.300). 

We accordingly lay off a horizontal 
scale ranging from 1.5 to 2.6 and a ver- 
tical scale ranging from 1.4 to 2.3. We 
can now readily construct logarithmic 
scales of D and EL The log of 100 is 
2, so the value 100 (of D or II) will 
appear opposite the point 2 in our 
scales. Similarly log 140=2.146 and the 
value 140 will, therefore, appear at the 
point 2.146 on our scales. In this way 
we find as many points as we deem 
sufficient to complete the scales. The ex- 
perimental result- are now plotted in the 
usual fashion. For instance, at a pres- 
sure of 100 lbs. per sq. inch, the f in. 
nozzle was found to discharge 121 gal- 
lons per minute. Through the point 100 
on the H scale we draw a horizontal line 
to meet a vertical line through the point 

•Designers with the John Inglls Co. To- 
ronto. 



121 on the D scale, and the point of 
intersection P, is a point on the curve 
for the | in. nozzle. 

When all the points are plotted the 
nearest straight lines are drawn through 
them. The equation to each of the 
straight lines is deduced in the follow- 
in g way: 

If D=A Hn 
log D=log A-|-n log H. 
Log A is a constant quantity and n is, 
in the diagram, the tangent of the 
angle which the line makes with the ver- 
tical axis. Considering point P 
PQ 7.8 1 

n= = =— ; 

QR 15.6 2 
log D=2.083; and H=2; therefore we 
have from the equation, 

log D=log A-4-n log H; 
2.083=log A+y 2 X2; or 
log A=1.083; therefore 
A=12.1. 
There fore. D=12.1 H% is, very ap- 
proximately, the equation to the line. 



In the equations given in the dia- 
gram, D is the discharge in Imperial 
gallons per minute, and H is the head 
at the orifice in pds. per sq. inch. The 
diagram also shows a scale of discharge . 
in IT. S. gallons per minute, and a scale 
of heads in feet of water. These are 
easily constructed as follows: 

Taking N. Imp. gall.=(1.2N) U.S. 
gal.=M. U. S. gal., we have log M=log 
1.2+log N.=0.079+log N. 

Therefore, if, on our logarithmic scale 
of Imp. gallons we add to any value N 
a distance equal to 0.079 on our scale 
of logarithmic we shall arrive at the cor- 
responding value M of U. S. gallons. 
For example, if N be 100 in Imp. gal., 
we see this number is at 2.0 on our orig- 
inal scale of logarithms, and opposite 
the reading 2.079 on the scale we find 120. 
which is the corresponding value M in U. 
S. gals. In other words, the U. S. gal. 
scale is obtained by moving the Imp. 
gal. scale forward through a distance 
0.079 on our scale of logarithms. This 



4k 





Apparatus Used In Test 

For any value of H, within the limits 
of the line, we can find D from this 
equation, 

If 11=166; 

D=12.1 V166=12.1X12.9=156 



has been done on the diagram by mov- 
ing the scale this distance to the left, 
and placing it at the top of the diagram, 
to avoid confusion. It will be seen that 
120 on the U. S. scale is vertically above 






which is the value given by the graph. 100 on the Imperial scale. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



11 



Similarly, if we take 1 lb. per sq. inch 
to be equivalent to a head of 2.31 feet 
of water, the 'feet' scale is obtained by 
lowering the lbs. per sq. inch scale 
through a distance=log 2.31 (i.e. 0.367) 
on the scale of logarithms. 

Apparatus and Experiment. 

The arrangement of the apparatus 
and the type of nozzle are shown in 
drawing. The nozzles were arranged in 
order of size in a row upon a 10 in. 
diam. horizontal pipe; the largest nozzle 
was towards the supply end, and an air 
vessel was provided at the closed end. 
Each nozzle was isolated by a gate valve 
with a clear bore of area not less than 
five times that of the nozzle, and the 
length of the parrallel bore at the outlet 
of each nozzle was at least equal to the 
diameter of the nozzle. 

The water was delivered to the 10 
in. main, by means of a plunger pump, 
and was measured by counting the re- 
volutions of the pump; a correction be- 
ing made for slip at each pressure. The 



slip was measured by shutting down the 
discharge valve and driving the pump 
to keep the required pressure constant. 
For example, if the pump was driven at 
50 r.p.m. to maintain a pressure of 100 
pds. per sq. inch during an experiment, 
and if, when the discharge valve was 
closed the pump had to make one r.p.m. 
to keep the pressure at 100 pds. per 
sq. inch, then the slip was taken as 1 in 
50 or 2 per cent. Precautions were taken 
to have fairly steady conditions before 
talcing any readings. 

Conclusions. 
All the nozzles were 'ringed.' i.e., 
they had an inside shoulder as shown in 
drawing, except the | inch nozzle which 
was made from the i inch pattern by 
boring away the ring, and which was 
therefore a smooth nozzle. This prob- 
ably accounts for the fact of the dis- 
charge being relatively greater in the 
case of this nozzle, as the restriction of 
the flow would be less than in the others. 
The diagram shows this greater dis- 

Dlschoroe in 



charge very clearly by the altered slope 

"I' I he curve. 

That all the points should lie so nearly 
upon straight lines, and that these lines 
should be parallel for similar nozzles, 
would indicate that the method of meas- 
uring the discharge, adopted in making 
the experiments, was a reliable one. 

It is at once evident from the diagram 
that each curve consists of two distinct 
portions, indicating two laws of resiot- 
ance to the flow of the water. Up to the 
bend in the curve the resistance fol- 
lows a definite law, but at the bend 
a velocity is reached at which the 
resistance becomes less, and it continues 
to be less, according to a new definite 
law, throughout the higher velocities. 

It is supposed that this change in the 
law of resistance was due to the prox- 
imity of the gate valve to the orifice. 
The gate valve was equivalent to a sud- 
den enlargement in the area of the pipe 
section and this would cause additional 
eddies and increase the resistance to the 
US. Gal/ah s /bet^ Minute. 






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Uischarcje in Imperiof Gallons per Minute. 1*jD 



\2 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



t!'>u ;ii the lower velocities. It is how- 
ever conceivable that a oertaia velocity 
would be reached at which the water 

would shoot past the valve so quickly 
that it would not be sensibly affected by 
the enlargement; the latter would cease 
to produce a noticeable increase in the 
. and this would obtain for all 
higher velocities. 

It is therefore concluded that the re- 
sults given in the table and diagram 
admit of practical application only 
under circumstances where the condi- 
tions of experiment are approximately 
obtained with regard to the position of 
the nozzle with reference to the gate 
valve. 

The object of the above experiments 
was the calibration of an apparatus for 
the testing of centrifugal pumps. 



Discharge from Bborl nozzles, in Imperial and U.S. gallons, per minute. 



I'ressure at nozle— lbs. 



■ I ooszle 

'.-in 

do 

%-ln 

do 

: V>" 

do 

l-in 

do 

1%-ln ... . 

do 



Size of nozzle. 



>,.-in. 

do 

%-in 
do. 

%-in 

do 
l-in . 

do 
l'^-in 

do 



SO 

41 

:\- 
50 

42 
100 

IT.". 
14e, 
195 
163 



120 

72 
60 
<i. r . 
7!' 
1(10 

i3a 

290 
242 
338 



40 
4-.I 
41 
50 
47 

110 
!ll 

196 

162 

207 

172 



130 
7(i 
68 
100 
83 
166 
138 
305 
255 
351 



50 

51 

43 

62 

52 

115 

96 

202 

168 

220 

184 



140 

71) 

66 

105 

87 

173 

144 

315 

264 



60 

54 

45 

60 

55 
121 
101 
215 
179 
242 
201 



70 

57 

47 

71 

59 

127 

100 

222 

185 

258 

215 



80 

59 

49 

76 

63 

135 

112 

235 

196 

282 

235 



90 

64 

53 

80 

67 

139 

116 

256 

214 

293 

245 



I'ressure at nozzle — lbs. 



150 

82 

68 

110 

92 

178 

148 

325 

272 

364 377 



293 304 



315 



160 

84 

70 
114 

95 
184 
153 
335 
280 
391 
326 334 



170 
87 

72 
118 

98 
189 
158 
347 
290 
401 



180 
89 
74 
120 
100 
194 
162 
355 
296 
411 
343 



100 
68 

56 
84 
70 
145 
121 
270 
225 
308 
250 



91 
70 
123 
102 
199 
160 
303 
303 
423 
353 



110 

70 

58 

90 

75 

153 

127 

280 

234 

324 

270 



1 Imp equals 

1.2 U.S. 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 



190 200 



95 
79 
125 
104 
204 
170 
375 
313 
437 
364 



U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 
U.S. 
Imp 



A Day's Ramble Through the M.C.R. Shops at St. Thomas 

By Fred. H. Moody 

Every Shop has its Ways and Means of Meeting Exigiencics That Arise in the Shape of Un- 
usual or New Jobs, but the Railway Repair Shop has an Exceptionally Large Number of Such 
Special Tools. The M. C. R. Shops, Under the Direction of an able Staff of Men, have De- 
veloped Numerous Special Methods and Devices, a Number of Which Were Picked up by 
the Writer in a Recent Trip Through the Shops, and are Here Given with Some Detail, as 
They Will Doubtless Prove Beneficial to Machinists, in General, in Developing Initiative for 
Undertaking New Jobs. 



PART II. 
Boiler Shop. 

Coming to the boiler shop, a number 
of special tools are to be found, a few 
of which will be described. Fig. 10 
shows a holding-on tool that has sev- 
eral unique features. It will be Noticed 
that it can be used close in against any 
side sheet by using the outer holding-on 
bar. The device consists of a piece of 
heavy wrought iron pipe A bored as 
shown. There are two covers BB screw- 
ed on, the top one having openings. In- 
side is the piston C built up as indicat- 
ed, with a leather packing ring. From 
this piston, extend two rods, D and E, 
of which D is centrally located, and E, 
offset. Normally D is used, but where 
the rivets are up close to a side, as for 
example the rivets between ':he toiler 
shell and head, the die on E is made use 
of. Air is introduced by the usual air 
valve and hose, below the pisun O, forc- 
ing the desired die against 1 he rivet 
head. As will be noticed, the dies on 
the heads of D and E may be r^'accd 
with others to suit the rivet in hand. 

Another holding on tool is shown in 
Fig. 11, and is one that is ily ••■i/uoy- 
ed where the clearance space above the 
rivet is small, as in the water leg, 
where the working space is never over 
4 or 5 inches The usual method of doing 



this work is by a cup and wedge bar, a 
rather inconvenient method. The hold- 
ing on block under discussion, is loosely 
suspended in the water leg by a wire 
through hole A. The hot rivet is placed 
in its hole, and the bevelled edge B plac- 
ed against its head. A drift pin is then 




Fit.'. 10— Double Holding-on Tool. 



shoved through a stay bolt hole from the 
firebox, and engages with either one of 
holes CC. Pressure from the firebox on 
the drift pin, holds this bevelled face B 
tight over the rivet, which can be rivet- 
ed from the outside of the boiler. While 
apparently a rather unstable arrange- 
ment, the results from its use are excel- 
lent, and besides, it is much more con- 
venient than the before mentioned cus- 
tomary method of cup and wedge bar. 

The stay bolt socket, Fig. 12, is 
unique in that it is equally good for 
driving in, or removing stay bolts. As 
can be seen, it consists of a tool steel 
engaging piece A in a soft steel shell B 
to fit an air drill. The two are keyed at 
C. The engaging piece A has tapered 
flutes like an external reamer, only the 
halves are symmetrically the same, one 
half being effective in screwing in the 
stay-bolts, and the other half in the re- 
moving operation. The taper makes the 
grip very positive. When A is worn 
out, the part B is still useful for a new 
grip. 

Continuing on the subject of stay-bolts 
there are several original ideas in use at 
these shops. For example, a new type 
of stay bolt tap is extensively used. It 
is believed, and justly too, that the 
usual stay bolt tap, reams the hole much 






fl^cJk^ 



larger than it should be before the tap 
takes a grip and a thread begun. The 
tap used here is short, and straight up 
to within an inch and a half, or so, from 
the end, when, instead of being ground 

<3 



a 



&° 




CANADIAN MACHINERY 

steel of varying length, with a collar 
around the whole to band them together. 
Fig. 14 shows a press employed in this 
banding operation. It consists of an old 
air eamjiLEdssOT cylinder A, and a forging 
B. On the end of the air piston rod is 
a head C. The pile of component parts 
of the spring are placed on this head, 
located centrally. Air pressure in A 
lifts the pile against the projecting arm 
of B, compressing them together snugly. 
A clamp is then placed over this com- 

I* 



L_J 



■^ 



Fig. 11 — Holding-on Block. 

down the thread is cut on the taper. 
Thus, there is always a full thread, the 
tips being, of course, smaller in diam- 



Fig. 13— Taper Anvil. 

pressed bundle just off centre. The pres- 
sure is then relieved, and the spring re- 
moved. The clamp being to one side 
leaves the centre free to have the retain- 
ing band shrunk on. The usual method 
of banding, is to put a large collar over 
the bundle, and compress by driving a 
wedge in between the large collar and 




Pig. 12— Staybolt Socket. 



eter. The full thread always grips with- 
out slipping, and reaming the hole. 
While more expensive, the extra cost is 
warranted by the superiority of the 
work. 

Carrying out this same principle-, they 
have a good way of tapping for radial 
stay-bolts. A hollow tap of the form 
just mentioned, is slipped over the re- 
duced end of a round bar, the latter 
slightly smaller than the punched holes. 
This act as a guide for the tapping oper- 
ation through the outer sheet, when a 
similar operation is performed from the 
inside, through the inner sheet, the rod 
guiding in the inner and outer sheets in 
each operation, respectively. 
Blacksmith Shop. 

Fig 13 shows an anvil used in the 
smith shop for forging tapers on rods or 
bars. It is essentially the usual steam 
hammer anvil, with an inserted circular 
piece A. This piece can be moved around 
to make its upper face at any angle 
with the face of the stationary part. 
Bevels can thereby be forged very expe- 
ditiously. The arrangement is so simple, 
further explanation is unnecessary. 

The springs under the locomotive, are 
built up of a number of strips of spring 



the springs, after which the retaining 
band is shrunk on. The method describ- 
ed is much more expeditious, and allows 
of no error in adjustment. 

A large variety of work is handled in 
the car repair department, giving a wide 



13 



range of appliances. The most interest- 
ing operations are those on the bull- 
dozer, where a number of special dies 
have been prepared. Such parts as the 
car sill/ step and coupler pocket, are 
made in a very simple manner, the form- 
er in one operation, and the latter in 
three. 



Fig. 14 — Spring Press. 

Fig. 15 shows a neat bending device 
for making eye bolts. The piece to be 
bent is placed against the angle A and 
clamped there by eccentric B. The rol- 
ler C on arm D, which has previously- 
been swung around behind the bar to be 
bent, is swung around in the opposite 
direction, bending the bar around the 
centre pin E. The distance between pin 
E and roller C is the thickness of the 
stock to be bent. This distance can be 




varied at will by loosening bolt F and 
sliding D in or out on the pivoted bar 
G, which turns on centre bar H. A 
guide piece I, makes the strip D more 
rigid. J acts as a stiffener for the an- 



Pig. 15 — Eye Beuder. 



14 



CANA1 IAN MACHINERY 



gle A which can be adjusted to suit the 
work, as it is slotted as shown. 
The punch press in the car shop has 

T -J -^ 




Vig. 16 — Wood Drill for use between C;ir Sills 

a spacer for spacing rivet holes in 
plates or bars. The spacer consists of a 
long piece of metal with a groove, 
through which bolts are secured. The 
upper end of the bolt is so made as to 



fit the size of hole being punched. Being 
adjustable, it can be set to engage with 
a punched hole the proper distance from 
the hole to be punched, thereby properly 
spacing the holes. 

Fig. 16 shows a home-made drill for 
drilling in the confined space between the 
sills of cars. AA are car sills, in which 
holes are to be drilled. The device con- 
sists in a wooden base B to which an 
upright wooden arm C is hinged. On C 
is an old bicycle sprocket D with handle 
E. D drives a smaller sprocket F 
through chain G. Sprocket F has a 
square recess to hold the wood bit H. 
The method of operating is self-ex- 
planatory. 

In the car shop, repairs were being 
made to the cement floor, which had 
holes in places. A composition of ce- 
ment and cast iron chips, a mixture fre- 
quently employed, was being used, the 
results proving very satisfactory, the 
mixture forming a hard, wear-resisting 
surface. 

Round House. 

For removing the locomotive drivers, 
sections of the rail over the pit must be 
removable to allow of the wheel drop- 
ping. The arched rail used by the M. 
C.R. is shown in Fig. 17. The custom- 
ary method of bracing this removable 
section, is to put a heavy casting under 
the rail, making the removable section 
very unwieldly. The method shown 
makes for a lighter construction. 

The jack for lowering the locomotive 
drivers, is also shown in Fig. 17. It is 
of the telescope construction, allowing 




of a more compact arrangement, much 
shallower than the straight lift type 
would permit. The sleeves slide past 
each other, the whole being actuated by 
compressed air. The jack is on a small 
truck, which moves lengthwise on a 
larger truck, the latter having a track 
long enough to run outside and clear the 
locomotive rails. This is to permit of 
lifting the drivers completely away from 
the locomotive for repairs. The whole 
construction is clearly shown by the cut. 



Fig it Telescope Jacli and Anchored Rail 



COBALT-CHROMIUM ALLOY. 

Stellite is the name of a Cobalt 
chromium alloy which has been discov- 
ered by Elwood Haynes. It can be made 
into cutting tools which meet all the re»- 
quirements of ordinary use and will not 
tarnish or rust. The inventor has tested 
the new alloy in many forms, having 
used it in razor blades and in lathe 
tools for cutting steel at a high rate of 
speed. The razor blades, although tak- 
ing a satisfactory edge, were acknow- 
ledged inferior to steel razors on account 
of requiring more frequent stropping, 
but for many tools the alloy was found 
superior to steel. 

Notwithstanding the great hardness of 
the alloy, it not only forges readily at 
a red heat, but can be bent at a right 
angle cold, either in the form of a cast 
or forged bar, provided the dimensions 
do not exceed one-fourth inch square. 
Its elastic limit is not quite equal to 
that of tool steel of the same hardness, 
but it is much tougher. In color the 
metal stands between silver and steel, 
and if suitably polished shows a high 
lustre. Many experiments were made 
before an alloy could be produced that 
would forge out perfectly into thin 
strips, and shows no tendency to check. 
After cooling, these strips are as hard 
as mild-tempered steel, and can scarcely 
be scratched by a file. A kitchen knife 
blade was made from this material, and 
after two years of use showed not the 
faintest sign of, tarnishing. If held in 
the sun it produced a reflection that 
would dazzle the eye. 

A lathe tool test was made against 
high speed steel, and it was found that 
the stellite tool would cut a continuous 
shaving from, the bar at the speed of 
two hundred feet per minute, while the 
high speed alloy steel tools failed al- 
most instantly. Tt does not follow from 
this that the alloy is better suited for 
high speed lathe tools than good alloy 
steel, but simply that it will stand a 
higher speed without softening. It 
would not be reasonable to expect a re- 
volution in tool-making on account of 
this discovery. There is in the new al- 
loy a possible outlet for the great Cobalt 
production of Ontario's silver mines. 
This gives the matter special interest 
in Ontario at the present time. 



MACHINE SHOP METHODS \ DEVICES 

Unique Ways of Doing Things in the Machine Shop. Readers' Opinions 
Concerning Shop Practice. Data for Machinists. Contributions paid for. 



LARGE JOB IN SMALL SHOP. 

By Frank E. Booth. 

The job in question was the boring out 
of the five bearing boxes of a four cyl- 
inder vertical internal combustion en- 
gine. 

The only machine available 
for the job was a Ber- 
tram lathe having 16 inches swing be- 
tween the centre and the ways, with a 
distance of 8 ft. between centres. The 
engine base was about 6 ft. 6 in. long, 




Engine Bed Ready for Boring Operation. 

while the longest bearing was 8 inches. 
The job was bolted firmly to the lathe 
carriage at one end, while the other end 
was supported by two hardwood blocks 
bolted to the engine base, and fitted to 
the lathe ways as shown in the sketch. 
A solid boring bar, with a head for 
carrying the tool, was used, and the 
head was shifted from one box to the 
other as the job progressed. A first class 
job was the result. 



CRANK SHAFT JIG. 

In the shops of the Canada Gas Power 
and Producer Co., Barrie, Ont., there 
is a very convenient form of jig in use 
for turning the crank pin of the solid 
crank shafts used in the Weber engines 
built by that concern. This method 
of machining is due to E. J. Graves, 
superintendent of the plant. 



Fig. 1— Crank Shaft. 



The chuck or face plate of the lathe 
is removed, and the jig which lis thread- 
ed at A to correspond to the lathe 
spindle, is screwed on. Either end A 



of the crank shaft is then inserted into 
hole B of the jig, so that the face B of 
the shaft is flush with face C of the jig. 
The offset C of the crank sets into 
recess D of the jig, and set screws E 
can be adjusted to centralize the crank 
pin. The clamping screws F are then 




Fig. •! — Crank Shaft Jig. 

tightened and the crank pin is ready to 
turn. 

Of course, different sizes of jigs are 
required for the various kinds of shafts 
produced. Each jig has another fea- 
ture of interest. The radius of the con- 
tour G of the jig is made the proper 
radius of the edge D of the crank shaft, 
from the crank pin centre, so that the 
tool is quickly set to reduce the shaft 
to the proper size. 



CUTTING LONG LEAD SCREW. 

Cutting a 41 ft. lead screw in a shop 
where the longest lathe is 22 ft. presents 
a problem. But this was recently over- 
come in the works of the John Bertram 
& Sons Co., Dundas. A still more diffi- 
cult act was the cutting of a 45 ft. lead 
screw, more than double the length of 
the lathe on this same lathe. 

The first lead screw referred to is, to 
be exact, 40 ft. 10i ins. long, 2 in. pitch, 
double thread and 4& in. diameter. The 
screw was mounted in the lathe with 
outward bearings set up for the over- 



was made in three equal parts. The 
centre piece had the screw cut on it, 
leaving a short piece not cut at each 
end. The two other parts were then 
welded on, one on each end. The screw 
was then mounted and a procedure 
similar to that already described fol- 
lowed. 

In connection with cutting lead screws. 
the John Bertram & Sons Co. keep mas- 
ter lead screws, absolutely accurate, and 
periodically lead screws on the lathes in 
the shop are renewed to conform with 
the master lead screw. In this way ac- 
curate lathe work in the production of 
machine tools is assured. It is of inter- 
est that the lathe with a 22-ft. bed 
mentioned above, was built by the John 
Bertram & Sons Co. and was used by 
Henry Bertram, the present general 
manager, to cut lead screws in 1875. 



JIG FOR FACING TWIN PUMPS. 

One of the principal products of the 
Canada Foundry Co., is feed pumps for 
varied uses. To facilitate rapid pro- 
duction, many useful devices in the form 
of .jigs, special machines, etc., are em- 
ployed. One of the most interesting of 
these jigs, is the one shown in the ac- 
companying sketch, which is used for 
machining the valve face, motion 
bracket, and body of the steam cylinder 
and stretcher, all at one setting. 

The device consists essentially of two 
cast iron angle plates, to which are at- 
tached removable collars. The bore of 
the cylinder just fits over the collar at 
one end, and the collars on the other 
angle plate, fit into the ends of the cy- 
linder stretchers. 

As shown the jig will only apply to 
one spacing of cylinders, that is, for a 
given distance apart of centres, but, by 
the use of eccentric collars as shown at 
A, any distance apart may be handled 




Jig for Facing Twin Pumps. 

hang. The thread was cut half way by the use of the proper collars. As 

along the leadscrew, reversed, and the the company uses fit, the jig is made for 

other half cut. 5 inch centres, with eccentrics for 1\ 

In cutting the 45 ft. lead screw, it inch centres. 



1«» 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



HIGH SPEED CUTTER. 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Dandas, 

out a large number of steel gears from 
the solid. Tn machining them and cut- 
ting the gear teeth greal difficulty was 

encountered in securing cutters to stand 
up to the work. After some experiment- 
ing, however, a cutter was designed with 
each tooth tapered from the nose to- 
wards the centre of the cutter. With 
such a cutter a speed of 120 ft. per min. 
is maintained and 50 per cent, of the 
time is saved. This is attributed to the 
relieving of the teeth on the sides. 

PITCH OF PROPELLER. 

In the November issue of Canadian 
Machinery. I\. Ewart Cleaton gave an 
article on "Practical Method of Obtain- 
ing Pitch of Propeller." We find, how- 
ever, that the printers have made a seri- 
ous error in Simpson's Rule which 
should read as follows : — 

7 

a=— (E+4S-f2m) 

3 
Where a = Area in square inches. 

y = Distance between ordi- 

nates. 
E = Sum of extreme ordinates. 
S = Sum of even ordinates. 
m = Sum of odd ordinates. 

ECONOMIC PUNCHING. 
By K. Campbell. 

There were a great many bars to be 
machined in the plant where I served 
my apprenticeship. These were about 
2i in. by % in., and had from 15 to 20 
holes drilled in each. This cost 6 or 
8 cents each, and they were then count- 
ersunk at a cost of 2 or 3 cents each ad- 
ditional. lliErh speed steels were then 
introduced, making the cost less than 
this, yet allowing the drill operator to 
make a slightly larger amount per day. 

It was then found that more of these 

were needed, and unless some means 

devised, additional drills woul 1 have 




ically on a big punch, il was decided to 
instal one. This was done, and all the 
boles were punched at once. In Fig. 1, 
\ i- the punch, C the work, and B the 
die, G representing the machine frame. 

The bars were finished much more 
quickly, but they still required to be 
taken to the drills to be countersunk 
until the method shown in Fig. was 
adopted. A is the punch, B is the work 
when completed, F shows the counter- 
sunk bar, E the hardened die, and G 
representing the punch frame. It will 
be noted that the die is the diameter of 
the countersink. In this way the second 
handling of the bars wag done away 
with, and the work done very cheaply. 

Another job that was done on this 
large multiple punch was the work on 
binder bottoms. Formerly these were 
done on a single punch. The steel bot- 
toms were fastened to the template with 
steel bushings, the whole being on a 
large table with handles at each end. 
Two men operated the table and one the 
punch. The job was one of the most 
hated in the shop, and there was re- 
joicing when dies were made for the 
multiple punch to allow it being done on 
that machine. It made a big saving for 
the company, but incidentally it elimin- 
ated the days of hard, heavy lifting of 
the table, bottom and template, which 
had to be done for each hole punched, 
there being 50 or 60 in each binder 
bottom. These holes were of three dif- 
ferent sizes which necessitated handling 
them three times. 



TOGGLE JOINT ACTION. 

The toggle joint is used on various 
machines, such as rock crushers, presses 
for stamping sheet metal, etc. The two 
accompanying line drawings show the 
application of the toggle joint to a 
press. Referring to these, A is a crank 
keyed to the main crank-shaft of the 
press. Connecting-rod E, attached to 
i hi-, is pivoted in yoke II, which is sus- 




fr'ie. 1.' Economic Punching-- Kig. 2. 



to be installed. It was finally decided 
to punch them, and the bars were then 
punched one hole at a time. This put 
the idea into the management of punch- 
ing all the hole- at once. As there was 
other work that could be done eeonom- 



pended on rocker arms F and G, pivoted 
to the side frames of the machine, on 
opposite sides of H. Bell crank levers 
D are operated from the center pivot 
of II, through short links J. Links C 
connect the upper arms of bell cranks 



D with cranks B, which are keyed to 
rocker arm shafts. 

A comparison of the two illustrations 
will show the action of the mechanism. 
In Fig. 1, crank A is at its highest 
position. In Fig. 2, the blank holder is 
down. It will be seen that in this pos- 
ition bell cranks D and links C are 
straightened out, so that a powerful 




Pig. 1.— Toggle Joint Action— Fig. 2.— 



toggle action with an appropriate dwell 
is obtained, lasting through a consider- 
able portion of the revolution of the 
crank-shaft. 

Cranks B, in turn, operate the rocker 
arms, which, with the links connecting 
them with the blank holder slide form 
a second toggle joint mechanism. It 
will be seen that these two sets or toggle 
joints, acting in series as they do, give 
a powerful pressure to the blank holder, 
estimated at 2,000 tons. 



SAVING SHEET METAL. 

In stamping sheet metal, it -is possible 
to waste a lot of metal. Fig. 1 shows a 
method of stamping out washers where 
there is a large amount of waste. It 
will be evident from Fig. 2 that by stag- 



ooooooo 
ooooooo 
ooooooo 



Fig. 1.— Stamping Sheet Metal. 

gering the rows or cutting them zig-zag, 
more washers can be cut out of a sheet 
of metal. The E. W. Bliss Co., manu- 



MM 

Fig. 2. — Stamping Sheet Metal to Save 30 per 
Cent. 

facturers of presses, have estimated this 
saving at from 5 to 30 per cent. 

By making the cuts touch each other 
as much as possible, it is possible to se- 
cure the maximum economy in stamping 
out washers, Jin' order that the centre of. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



17 



the washer be not wasted, these can be 
used for making smaller washers. 



CENTRING INDICATOR HOLDER. 

This is a simple little device used in 
the tool-room of the London Machine 
Tool Co., Hamilton, for carrying the 
Starret Indicator No. 64. It was de- 
signed by the foreman toolmaker with 
the object of greater flexibility in get- 
ting at unhandy centres, as by this de- 
vice, the connecting arms make any 
position of the (indicator practically 
possible. 

A is held in the tool post of the 





Centring Indicator Holder. 



lathe, while the indicator is attached 
to arm C, the intervening arm B being 
used to increase the range. A is a 
piece of machinery steel, and rods B 
and C are of stub steel, requiring no 
extra finish. The joint between B and 
C is cast steel, slit at the ends to facil- 
itate clamping, making in all a very 
simple and useful device. Tool-makers 
and machinists will find this a useful 
addition to their outfits, and it re- 
quires very little time or exertion to 
make. 

JIG FOR HOLDING CASTLE NUTS 
WHILE CUTTING SLOTS. 
By G. C. White. 
In the works of the C.P.R. at Mon- 
treal, a jig similar to the one shown in 
the cut is used for holding nuts so that 



Diameter 

o( ['-oil 


A 


B 


c 


D 


Width 

across Fltus 


\" 


Ik" 


'-v.' 


%' 


V 


l 7 /),;" 


«" 


IV 


H«" 


%" 


V 


IV 


IV 


IH" 


•4" 


V 


; '<1o" 


l%" 


I!-." 


111" 


V 


1" 


w 


2" 


IV 


IV 


«" 


Ik" 


Ma" 


2 V 


IH" 


IV 


V 


IV 


V,,-" 


2 V 



* These »re tbe only Dimension for the Unfinished Nut. 




Stud 



Jig for Slotting Castle Nuts. 

they may have slots cut in them. The 
machine used is an old universal mill- 
ing machine, which is operated by an 



apprentice. The only difficulty, if it 
may be termed such, is that for every 
size of nut there must be a dufferent- 
sized stud. This jig enables the com- 
pany to turn out approximately, thirty 
$-inch, twenty-six 1-inch, twenty-four 
l£-inch, twenty-two 1^-inch, eighteen 
lf-inch or eighteen H-inch nuts every 
45 minutes. — American Machinist. 

TO SHARPEN A PIPE DIE. 

By A. F. Bishop. 
I discovered a short time ago that a 
mill-cut file would sharpen a solid pipe 
die quite easily and quickly without re- 
moving the temper in the die. The first 
few rubs of the file will slide without 




Sharpening a Pipe Die with a Pile. 

cutting, this being due to the grease on 
the die. Just as soon as the greasy sur- 
face is thoroughly worked off, the file 
will commence to cut, and will cut very 
smoothly, making a keen edge on the 
cutting thread. Heretofore I have al- 
ways worked on emery grinders to try 
to do this work without removing the 
temper of the die, but found they work- 
ed very slowly on account of the small 
diameter of the wheels, also that it was 
quite a nuisance to set the die for the 
cutting wheel. Most mechanics would 
not try the file, not having the least 
idea that it would do the work. That 
was mv case. — Scientific American. 



FIXTURE FOR CUTTING MITRE 
GEARS. 

The following method for cutting the 
teeth in mitre-gear blanks, on a No. 2 
plain milling machine with a universal 
head, is given in the American Machin- 
ist. The gears are mild steel, 37 teeth, 
6 pitch. They are finished in two cuts 



centre for the head as secured to the 
machine table, a f-inch pin being in 
one end acting as a pivot about which 
the small table is free to swing. After 
the blank is set this table is strapped 
securely. The face and cut angles of a 
mitre gear together make 90 degrees, 
and it follows that when the blank is 
set up for cutting, the apex of the cone 
angle is in a vertical line with the face 
of the blank. The blank is set so that 
this vertical line falls in the centre of 
the f-inch pin. The table with head is 



Line of Cut 



90 Degrees 




Fixture lor Cutting Mitre Gears on a Plaia 
Milling Machine. 

now swung either way an amount that 
will give a correctly shaped tooth on 
that side. After going around, swing 
the table the same amount in the other 
direction- Of course, the cutter must 
be set in position before the table is 
swung either way. The amount to set 
the table over will have to be found by 
trial, but once found the same marks 
will answer for any size mitre gear. 
The sketch shows this arrangement. 

COMBINED DRILLING AND MILL- 
ING JIG. 

By Wilfrid J. Thompson. 

The inclosed sketch is of a jig used for 
both drilling and milling the lugs of a 
small eccentric strap, shown at F. A, 
Fig. 1, is gray iron with the plate B 
(the drill guide) screwed and doweled to 
it. C is the locating stop, which is of 
hardened steel and fits fairly well in the 
rough f-inch groove in the strap. 

The block D is of machinery steel 
about 1\ inches wide and is forced up 
by the wedge E against the bottom of 



' 1 B ' ' 

T-T D 1 1 




| 1 

A 




c 


1 




E 










Fig. 1.— Combined Drilling and Milling Jig.— Fig. 2. 



and do not require filing. They wear 
well and run quietly. 
A small table with a groove up the 



the lugs of the strap locating the latter 
with C and parallel with the top of the 
jig- 



IS 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Fit;. 2 shows the work in position 
ready to be drilled. When used as a 
milling fixture the plate B is first re- 
moved. Fig. 1 shows an end view of the 
jig without the work or block D in 
place. Cj is a part section of C. 

This is a cheap, easy jig to make, 
quick to operate, and about as near tool- 
proof as any tool can be —American Ma- 
chinist. 

INFLUENCE OF GALVANIZING ON 
STRENGTH OF WIRE. 

Wire woven into ropes and cables and 
lor the most part where the wea- 
ther exerts a deteriorating influence, re- 
quires suitable protect ion. if its useful- 
ness is to be a dependable factor. Coat- 
ing with zinc has been found to answer 
the purpose admirably. Experiment and 
investigation show the formation of a 
et, in which the zinc of the galvan- 
ized iron forms the electro positive ele- 
ment, and the iron the electro-negative, 
when the material is immersed in water 
or other fluid. The zinc takes up oxy- 
gen, gradually forming a zinc oxide, 
while on account of the evolution of 
hydrogen, the iron remains inert, even 
if the continuity of the zinc coating is 
slightly broken. 

In the process of hot galvanizing, 
there is no question but that the 
strength and particularly the resistance 
to bending and torsion, are considerably 
affected. Many theories have been 
propounded to explain the loss of feu- 
sile strength. Poor material is cited, 
but the best has been shown to suffer. 
The "overdrawing" of the steel has 
been suggested, but microscopic tests 
under this head, fail to reveal it as a 
cause. Irregularity of zinc coating has 
also been suggested, but it likewise fails 
to reveal the situation. 

Absorbed Hydrogen Gas Does the 
Damage 

The results of many recent investiga- 
tions show an absorption of hydrogen 
from the acid bath, in the pickling pro. 
previoua to galvanizing, resulting 
in considerable damage to the finished 
products in the matter of brittleness. 
Further investigation showed, however. 
that heating the steel up to 250 degrees 
Fall, for four hours, re-moves this bad 
effect entirely, and shows that galvaniz- 
ed wire can be produced with a mini- 
mum loss of physical properties, it be 
ing entirely a question of proper prac- 
tice in regard to removal of damage 
done by pickling, proper bath tempera- 
ture, and time of wire remaininir in it. 
The wire should be treated before gal- 
vanizing to remove the hydrogen, ami 
the temperature of the zinc bath should 
be regulated between close limits. The 



latter is in nowise easy, these being dif- 
ficulties in pyrometry and proper firing, 
where many wires are passed through 
constantly, with consequent irregular 
lowering of the temperature. 



Correspondence 

Comments on articles appearing in 
Canadian Machinery will be cheerfully 
welcomed and letters containing useful 
ideas will be paid for. 

Information regarding manufacturers 
of various lines, with their addresses 
will be supplied either through these 
columns or by letter, on request. Ad- 
dress letters to Canadian Machinery, 
143-149 University Ave., Toronto. — 
Editor. 



Designing Propellers. 

I have been much interested in reading 
the recent articles on propellers, their 
design, measuring of pitch, etc. When 
Mr. Baldwin set out to select an avia- 
tion propeller, he tried to select one 
from a number of various pitches. He 
tried to do this with a stationary outfit 
but found this method unsatisfactory, as 
the one making the best fan and turning 
out the greatest volume of air was of 
course not the best propeller. The selec- 
tion for his airship was made by fitting 
up an ice-boat, the propeller selected 
making about sixty miles an hour. — 
Reader. 



Tempering Small Shear Blades. 
We are enclosing you sketch of a knife 
made of crucible or section steel. Di- 
mensions are, length 6", width 2", and 



sometimes called "Tanners' Oil," but 
warping is caused from using any of the 
above if heated sufficiently to get the 
required hardness. While they require 
to be very hard, yet they must have 
toughness as well, as they are subject to 
severe strain and are liable to breakage. 

We would therefore consider it a favor 
if through the columns of "Canadian 
Machinery" you would prescribe method 
of heating and tempering the above 
knife. — C. Smith & Sons. 

For heating, make up a large level top- 
ped . fire on an ordinary blacksmith's 
hearth and on this lay a flat piece of §" 
boiler plate, raise and maintain this 
plate at a bright cherry red heat— about 
1480 degrees Fah.— lay the blades to be • 
tempered on the plate until they attain 
the same heat, they should be then taken 
off carefully one at a time with a pair 
of narrow nosed flat tongs and dipped in 
a bath of rain water that has been rais- 
ed to a temperature of 210 degrees Fah. 
"just off the boil," they should be 
quenched right out, "given all the water," 
as it is called, and afterwards polished 
with fine emery ; — great care must be 
taken in dipping that the blades enter 
the bath exactly vertically and edge 
downwards. For letting down to the re- 
quisite degree of hardness, a pair of 
broad flat bitt tongs, as shown in the 
sketch, should be used, heat the tong 
bitts to a bright red and with them hold 
the blade to be treated about f" from 
its back edge, the heat of the tongs will 
draw the temper and when the right 
color shows on the cutting edge quench 
out in cold water again, taking care that 
the blade enters the water vertically. I 
should think that a medium straw color 
would represent about the right temper. 
It will be found that the whole temper 



6' inches Jonir. ■ 



Soft Back about 1-inch wide. 



Very hard ed^e about 1-inch wide. 



Serrated ed«c JO to 12 per inch, J-in. ^om 



\ 



Small Shear Blade. 



11 Gr. thick, and to have soft back about 
1" wide and cutting edge to have ex- 
treme hardness about 1" from edge and 
serrated about I" from edge, 10 to 12 
serrations per inch. 

We have experienced much trouble 
from them warping while being dipped 
in the cooling bath. The substance we 
used for that purpose was spring and 
rain water, salt and water and fish oil, 
same as that used bv the tanners and 



will have been drawn from the back, leav- 
ing it normal and the hardness will gra- 
duate through to the edge, but to obtain 
a strictly defined line between hardness 
and softness would be practically impos- 
sible. 

Any warping or buckling can be remov- 
ed afterwards by hammering on a planed 
grey-iron block with a raw-hide mallet, 
first warming the blade slightly. This 
re-setting of thin hardened steel plates 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



19 



is a special trade, known as saw smith- 
ing and experts can command very high 
wages. 

In forging the blades great care should 
be taken against over heating— pure high 



These hunters can be made any shape 
to suit the work. For low work the 
hunter can be made with a low 
side and two or more can be used for a 
job. The bunters are made by milling 




lindiui about 2 ft. lnne 



■inch of Made held in tongs. 



Hude 6 inchos loop. 




Tongs for Tempering Blades 



carbon steel should be worked at as low 
a heat as possible, and for edge-tools 
should be always worked one way, 
"back to edge." If this is done and the 
steel be of good quality a uniform warp- 
ing will be observed at the first dip; this 
can be rectified by bending the blade in 
the opposite direction before dipping, 
and it is quite possible to remove the 
article from the bath quite straight, this 
practice has to be followed in hardening 
some kinds of files —Frank Walker. 



the two surfaces next the planer bed and 
the work, a single cut being all that is 
necessary. They are made indestructible 
if made of good steel and hardened. — 
K. Campbell. 



Holding Work on Planer. 
In the December issue of Canadian 
Machinery a device was described for 
holding work on a planer. In the accom- 
panying illustration is shown an angle 
plate B, sometimes called a bunter, 



£N 



B 




Holding Work on Planer. 

holding the work A on the planer bed C. 
Its object is to prevent denting finished 
work which would ordinarily be held by 
toe dogs or fingers. 



CISCOE LATHE TESTS. 

An interesting test of a Ciscoe 14-in. 
lathe, made by the Cincinnati Iron &• 
Steel Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, was made 
recently. Cuts were made in 0.25 per 
cent, carbon steel to a depth of 9-16 in. 
and 36 to the inch friction feed ; in the 
same material to a depth of 2 in. at 
18 to the inch screw feed, and in cast 
iron to a depth of £ in. at 18 to the 
inch screw feed. In these tests it was 
endeavored to break the lathe, but the 
only part that broke was the belt. This 
is justly considered exceedingly heavy 
work for a 14-in. lathe and indicates 
very forcibly its powerful construction. 
For these lathes the company has re- 
cently has three orders from Canada, 
two from California, one from Texas 
and one from New York, and it has also 
received orders for considerable equip- 
ment, (including larger lathes from 
Florida and miscellaneous small tools 
from Arkansas and Tennessee. 



ADDITION TO EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Since the first issue of Canadian Ma- 
chinery it has been the aim of the pub- 
lishers to keep in close touch with the 
developments in machinery, machine shop 
and engineering practice and thus 
give the readers accurate information 
on all subjects of interest to them. 
With the growth of the paper the work 
of keeping it up to the present high 
standard has necessitated an addition 
to its editorial staff. The publishers 
are pleased to announce that Peter 
Bain, M.E., formerly of Bain & 
Mitchell, Montreal, has joined the staff. 

Mr. Bain has had 20 years experience 
in the mechanical engineering field. He 
is a Clyde technically and practically 
trained man, having served with Mat- 
thew, Paul & Co., manufacturers of 
stationary, marine and high speed en- 
gines. He was on the "Niobe," the 
cruiser recently bought by the Cana- 
dian Government, during her first trials 
after launching. He was assistant man- 
ager at Wm. Spence, Dublin, during 
the installation of the refrigeration, 
and mechanical apparatus in connection 
with the Guinness' brewery extension, 
and during the construction of a num- 
ber of locomotives used in this large 
plant. 

Since coming to Canada Mr. Bain 
served as chief draftsman with the 
John McDougall Caledonia Iron Works, 
Montreal, later forming a partnership 
with Mr. Mitchell, under the title of 
Bain & Mitchell. He designed the large 
modem power plant of the Montreal 




PETER BAIN. M.E.. 

Steel Works, and taught the classes in 
engineering at the Montreal Y.M.C.A., 
under the International Y.M.C.A. Edu- 
cational Board. Many graduates of his 
classes now occupy important positions 
in the engineering field. Mr. Bain is 
therefore well qualified for editorial 
work on Canadian Machinery. 



DEVELOPMENTS IN MACHINERY 



New Machinery for Machine Shop, Foundry, Pattern Shop, Planing 
Mill ; New Engines, Boilers, Electrical Machinery, Transmission Devices. 



PLANER FOR HIGH SPEED STEEL. 

The planer Illustrated herewith is de- 
signed for the use of high speed si eels. 
Convenience, accuracy and strength 
were the points considered in its design. 
For exceptional heavy work the planer 
may be equipped with double belt drive 
and pneumatic clutch. 

The bed is made in deep box form of 
close grained iron. The sides are 
straight, neatly flanged on outside and 
inside at base. The cross braces are 
heavy, close together and the Y's beim; 
well ribbed to web make a stiff and 



The housings have a foot on floor, re- 
lieving the bod of any bending move- 
ment. The faces are scraped to cross 
bar, and arc polished and frosted. 

The cross bar has a long bearing on 
the housings, and is reinforced at 
centre by box of girder form cast solid 
with bar. The bar is raised and lowered 
by power on all sizes from 30 inch up. 

The head's have down and angular 
feed. Slides are all scraped and are 
provided with gibs for taking up the 
wear, with means for locking. The 
jrearins: is all cut from the solid on ae- 




Planer, London Machine Tool Co., Hamilton. 



strong construction. The centre to cen- 
tre of V's on planers is wide and the 
V's are also very wide. The bed is made 
sufficiently long to prevent table from 
lifting under the heaviest cuts when 
table is at extreme end of stroke. 

The table is made deep and stiff, be- 
in',' well ribbed crosswise and lengthwise. 
The V's are so designed that to prevent 
•exit or shaving from dropping through 
the table on to the Bliding surface, 
where they will cut and score. The din 
will drop through the table, but will 
drop on the outside or inside of bed, 
where it can do no harm. The table i- 
generally drilled with round holes. The 
T-slots on table are cut from the -olid. 

The rack is cut from the -olid and is 

secured to planer by means of screw- 

and dowels. The housings are made in 

. box form best calculated to re- 

-i-t the strain due to the heavies! cut-. 



curate gear cutting machinery, and all 
pinions are of steel. 

The feed rack is of steel cut from 
the solid steel bar, and the feed pinion 
is of steel. Hatchet pinions are all of 
steel. 

This planer is manufactured by the 
London .Machine Tool Co., Hamilton. 



CAR WHEEL BORING MACHINE. 

The illustration shows a car wheel 
borinjr machine made by the John Bert- 
rain Sons Co.. Dundas. It .has a cap- 



acity to bore wheels up to 42 ins. in 
diameter on the tread. It swings 48 
ins. in diameter. 

The table is provided with five self- 
centering gripping jaws. The cone has 
three steps 28, 24 and 20 ins. diameter 
for 6 in. belt. The boring spindle is 
counterbalanced and has quick return. 
It is also provided with three changes of 




Bertram 42-in. Car Wheel Boring Machine. 

feed, two for roughing and one for fin- 
ishing, changes from roughing to finish- 
ing can be made instantly. 

The machine is complete with counter- 
shaft, wrenches, pneumatic air-hoisting 
attachment, and power hub facing at- 
tachment. By means of the lifting at- 
tachment the wheels are picked up from 
the floor without the aid of a jib, over- 
head or portable crane and deposited on 
the floor after machining. This is prob- 
ably the first machine of this type regu- 
larly built. 



POSITIVE CHAIN TONGS AND PIPE 
VISE. 

The positive chain tongs shown in Fig. 
1, present many features of interest and 
value to sleamlitters and power plant 
engineers. They are made of drop 
forged steel, in sizes from f to 12 inch 




Pig. 1 — Positive Chain Tonga, McDonald & Sons, Toronto 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



21 



pipe. They are simple in constructional 

details, strong, light and reliable, are 
equally useful as pipe or fittings tongs, 
and grip at all angles. The chain is 
strong, being made to stand strains in 
excess of any leverage that may be ap- 
plied at the end of the handle. 

Companion to the chain tongs is a 
pipe vise, illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, 
the merits of which are as follows: It 
lies flat and open on the bench, permit- 



both spindle drive and feed mechanism. 
The details of the drive and the spindle 
change near mechanism are seen in the 
sectional views. Figs. 2 and 3. The driv- 
ing pulley A, Fig. 2, is mounted on a 
splined shaft a. which is supported in a 
bracket B, attached to the side of the 
machine column. 

There are twelve changes of spindle 



near the top of the column. The length 
of the ram is 35 inches and the width 
11'- inches. The driving pulley is 12 
inches in diameter, witli a 41-inch face, 
and should be run at a constant speed of 
300 revolutions per minute. 

The feed change mechanism gives six. 
teen changes of feed, ranging from 7-16 
inch to 13 inches feed of the table per 





Fig. 2 — Positive Pipe Vise, Open. 



Fig. 3— Positive Pipe Vise. Closed. 



ting lengths of pipe to be placed in or 
withdrawn freely without risk of wear 
or damages to the jaws. There aire four 
jaws instead of three as in most pat- 
terns, ensuring consequently better grip- 
ping qualities. The quick adjustment 
device consisting of loose nut with 
shank, knob and spring catch, enables 
pipe of varying sizes to be inserted and 
withdrawn without the labor attendant 
on turning the screw backward or for- 
ward each time. 

The vise is neat and compact, is made 
in four sizes from i to 12 inch pipe, 
and is patented in Canada and the Uni- 
ted States. 

MacDonald and Sons, Toronto are the 
patentees and manufacturers of both 
specialties. 



DUPLEX MILLING MACHINE. 

The Waltham Watch Tool Co., Spring- 
field, Mass., has placed on the market 
the No. 3 Van Norman duplex milling 
machine shown in Fig. 1. The special 
feature embodied in the construction of 
this machine that distinguishes it from 
other types of milling machines, is the 
movable cutter head, which is mounted 
on a ram or frame that may be adjusted 
in or out over the table to adapt the 
cutter for use in either a vertical or 
horizontal position, the cutter spindle 
being adjustable to any angle from the 
horizontal to the vertical. Among the 
features incorporated in the design of 
the No. 3 size which are not found in 
the sizes formerly built, may be men- 
tioned the single pulley or constant 
speed drive with a change gear mechan- 
ism for varying the spindle speeds, lo- 
cated in the ram; a geared feeding 
meehanism; an improved box type of 
knee; and a solid steel overhanging arm, 
which braces to give rigidity for either 
vertical or horizontal cuts. 

This machine is solidly constructed 
throughout and it has ample power for 



speeds, varying from 15 to 276 r.p.m., 
the speed changes being effected by 
operating the sliding gears F and I and 
the clutch N. All the gears are of steel, 
and those within the ram run in an oil 
bath. A handwheel on the end of shaft 
f may be used to facilitate bringing the 
gears into mesh when making changes. 

The eultter-head W, which has a 90 
degree angular adjustment, pivots on the 
trunnion ring T. The head is securely 
clamped on the face of the ram by three 
locking bolts which move in circular T 
slots. ' A bevel gear U N on the end of 




Fig. 1 — Van Norman No. 3 Duplex Milling 
Machine, Waltham Watch Co., Spring- 
field, Mass. 

shaft f, and a bevel gear V on the spin- 
dle, complete the drive connection. The 
cutter spindle has the conical form of 
bearings, and is made with a No. 13 
B. & S. taper, to adapt it for holding 
the large collet holder or reducing collets 
that are used in this machine. The ram 
may be securely clamped to the column 
by means of two binder levers, after the 
cutter spindle is located in the mosit ad- 
vantageous position for operation. This 
ram has a 13-inch movement in and out 
over the column, and the adjustment is 
effected by means of the crank shown 



minute. The drive to the feed-box is 
by a chain which connects with the main 
driving shaft. The table, which has a 
working surface of 45 by 10 inches, has 
a longitudinal feed of 30 inches, a trans- 
verse feed of 12 inches, and a vertical 




Figs. 



and 3 — Spindle Speed Changing 
Mechanism. 



feed of. 19 inches. The knee also has a 
vertical movement of 19 inches. The 
countershaft furnished with the machine 
has pulleys 13 inches in diameter and 
4J-inch face, for forward and reverse 
speeds. The swivel vise, also included 
in the equipment, has jaws 7 inches 
wide. 1J inch deep, with a maximum 
opening of \\ inches. The weight of 
this machine is approximately 4,000 
pounds. 



PLAIN MILLING MACHINE. 

The machine illustrated herewith fol- 
lows in general outline the accepted us- 
age of column millers, but has a number 
of features which tend to greater rigidi- 
ty and strength as well as ease of opera- 
tion. Substantiating the claim of the 



22 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



manufacturers, thai the machine is well 

adapted for high speed service. 

The column which is east in one piece 
has a considerable wider base than com- 
mon, to resist the weight of table when 
at extremes of travel, a generous oil re- 
taining rim surrounds this. The knee is 
of the box type, with extended top, and 
extra long bearing on column, is fitted 
with telescoping screw for elevation. 
The saddle is fitted with compensating 
stationary nut is very deep and inches 
lomr. The table has a great depth and 



M Mas >• 



Fig. i 



Plain Milling Machine, Grand Kapids 
Machine Co. 



a working surface of 32 x 8 inches with 
T-slots extending beyond oil pockets this 
gives additional space for fixtures, etc. 
in fact a 10 inch index outfit can be 
placed on same and allow full range of 
machine to be cul between centres. The 
spindle is of crucible steel and is bored 
for No. 10 B & S taper, and the cut 
shows the substantial journals as well 
as driving facilities consisting of a cone 
of three steps with a 12, 9 and 6 inch 
diameter for a 3 inch belt also back- 
gearing of 6$ to 1. When not back 




Fig. 2 — Phantom View of Peed Changing 
Mechanism. 

geared the cone has four steps 12, 10, 8 
and 6-inch. The feed gearing is of the 
selective sliding gear type. The phan- 
tom photos showing same to contain 13 
steel '.rears of heavy pitch which gives 
12 feeds. 

Driving is accomplished with a nickel 
steel chain single lever feed control (also 
shown on phantom photo) operates by 



throwing lever to the side table should 
also move to. railing it forward dis- 
engages the feed. 

The machine is fitted with a substan- 
tial arbor brace and is of the following 
range: table travel 24 inches, saddle 




Fig. 3 — Feed Controlling .Mechanism. 

travel 8 inches and knee travel 18 inches. 
Net weight of machine is 2,020 lbs. 

These machines are manufactured by 
the Grand Rapids Machine Tool Co., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

GEAR CUTTING MACHINE. 

The accompanying illustrations show 
an automatic spur gear cutting machine, 
manufactured by the Newark Gear Cut- 
ting Machine Co., Newark, N.J., for 
heavy spur gears. The machine has a 
capacity for gears up to 84 in. diameter. 



positively, without hammering. The 
spindle and arbor are amply heavy to 
secure the benefits of using a gang of 
finishing cutters, or a gang of finishing 
and roughing cutters side by side on the 
arbor. The spindle is driven by means 
of a powerful spur gear train. The 
various speed changes are obtained by 
means of change gears placed as near 
the last driver as possible. This allows 
the driving shafts to rotate at constant 
speed, and avoids undue strains in the 
shafts when the cutter is running at 
slow speed on heavy pitches. 

The changes of the feed of the cutter 
carriage are obtained in similar manner, 
by means of change gears; but the rate 
of the cutter speed and the rate of the 
carriage feed are independent of each 
other, so that one may be changed with, 
out affecting the other. The carriage 
quick return is constant, not being affect- 
ed by the feed or speed of the cutter. 
The carnage feed screw operates on the 
"draw-cut" principle, the thrust collars 
being placed so that the screw is not 
subjected to compression strains, either 
when feeding or returning the carriage. 
This draw-cut insures a smooth uniform 
feed to the carriage with freedom from 
vibration. The carriage also, as will be 
noticed in the photograph, is especially 
long, with the cutter spindle bearing in 
the centre of its length. This construc- 
tion prevents chattering or vibration, 
and as the bearings are very long, with 




Newark Gear-Cutting Machine. 



24 inch face, and to- cut 6 inches circu- 
lar pitch. 

The cutter spindle, crucible tool steel 
forging, is provided With a taper hole 
to receive cutter arbors. The cutter 
arbor is drawn into and forced out of 
the spindle, by means of a draw-in bolt, 



narrow guides, the action of the carri- 
age is very smooth and quiet running, 
even when operating under severe duty. 
The indexing or dividing mechanism 
comprises a large master wheel, and pos- 
itive actuating mechanism. The master 
wheel is a worm wheel, generated in 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



23 



place on each machine. It is made in 
sections, that is, a wheel proper, and a 
ring; this construction being used to 
insure accuracy not otherwise obtain- 
able. The master wheel receives its 
movement through the positive indexing 
mechanism, which embodies a very sim- 
ple clutch mechanism, requiring no ad- 
justment. The various divisions for dif- 
ferent numbers of teeth are obtained by 
means of change gears, which provide 
for cutting all numbers of teeth up to 
100, and all from 100 to 450 except 
prime numbers above 100. A wide 
range of higher numbers can also be 
cut. Where any unusual number is re- 
quired to be cut, this can be done by 
means of an extra change gear. 

In connection with the positive index- 
ing mechanism, is a safely device, which 
prevents the carriage from feeding until 
the division has been correctly comple- 
ted. This is especially valuable when 
it is considered that the machine cuts 
very large and expensive gears. A safe- 
ty mechanism also acts to prevent the 
machine from dividing when an obstruc- 
tion on the gear blank, such as a lug or 
flange, would collide with the rim sup- 
port, and otherwise, if it were not for 
the safety device, injure the gear or 
the machine. This mechanism is entire- 
ly automatic, and does not require any 
setting or adjustment, as it operates re- 
gardless of the size of the gear or the 
number of teeth being cut. It also is 
valuable, as though its interlocking fea- 
ture, it prevents the operator from en- 
gaging the feed mechanism, while the 
machine is dividing. 

The work spindle is of large diameter, 
machinery steel, accurately ground. It 
is provided with a taper hole, to receive 
work arbors; a draw-in bolt acting to 
draw the arbor in and force it out posi- 
tively. The work head is of massive 
proportions, and is so gibbed to the head, 
that the alignment is maintained with- 
out regard to which of the clamping 
bolts is tightened first. The head is 
provided with screw and micrometer 
dial, graduated to read to thousandths 
of an inch. Power mechanism is pro- 
vided for quick adjustment of the head, 
either up or down. The machine is very 
convenient, all the operating features 
being under the direct control of the 
operator. 



DIXON'S STEEL CAR PAINT. 

The Joseph Dixo n Crucible Co., Jersey 
City, N.J., have just issued a very at- 
tractive little booklet of envelope size on 
their paint for steel cars. The booklet 
not only goes into the merits of the 
Dixon paint for this service, but illus- 
trates a number of different types of 
steel cars upon which Dixon's paint has 
given excellent service. It also contains 
color chips showing the four colors in 



which Dixon's silica-graphite steel car 
paint is made. Anyone interested in 
steel car painting should send for a copy 
of this booklet which will be forwarded, 
free of charge. 

TUMBLING BARREL. 

The Globe Machine & Stamping Co.. 
Cleveland, 0., have placed on the market 
a new type of horizontal tumbling bar- 
rel for burnishing articles prior to plat- 
ing, and for polishing either plated or 
unplated parts. The burnishing is ef- 
fected by the use of steel balls. The bar- 
rel is of east iron lined with maple wood 
and has an octagonal cross section. These 
machines are made with three sizes of 
barrels, the smallest of which ds 24 in. 
in diameter by 8 in. wide, and the larg- 
est 30 in. in diameter with a width of 
16 in. They are also furnished in either 
the single, double or triple-barrel types. 

KILLING MOLDING MACHINE. 

A molding machine of the jarring 
power rockover type has been brought 
out by E. Killing's Molding Machine 
Works, Davenport, Iowa. When the ma- 
chine is being operated, the pattern is 
mounted on a pattern board and the 
whole is fastened to the rockover table. 
After the flask is in place and filled with 
sand, the mold is jarred to the proper 
density by compressed air, which is al- 
ternately applied and released automa- 
tically in the cylinder under the jarring 
table. Air is employed for this purpose 
and the pattern may be withdrawn at the 
speed which will give the best results. 
The jarring cylinder and the valve are 
simple in construction and the latter 
is of the expanding ring piston valve 
type. No springs are sued on this ma- 
chine and all working parts are protect- 
ed against the abrasive action of the 
sand. 

NEW CORE RAMMING MACHINE. 

The Norcross jarring machines manu- 
factured by the Arcade Mfg. Co., Free- 
port, 111., have been used extensively for 
ramming large cores. In order to make 
it possible to use a machine of this kind 
to better advantage a special type has 
been brought out and is primarily de- 
signed for ramming cores. It is shown 
in the accompanying illustration. 

The total height of the machine is 15 
inches. The piston is 8 inches in diam- 
eter and carries a table 24 by 30 inches. 
The piston travel in one-half inch and 
it will lift one thousand pounds. Under 
the table there is arranged a circular 
guide to keep the parts in line. 



In 1909 the bounty paid came to $1.- 
808,533. This went in great part to the 
Dominion Steel Corporation, $1,029,503; 
to the Algoma Co., Sault Ste. Marie, 
$348,814, and to the Hamilton Steel & 
Iron Co., Hamilton, $238,408. 

The rate paid in 1910 was 90 cents a 
ton for pig iron, 60 cents for puddled 
bars, and 60 cents for steels. Unless 
something is done at Ottawa these boun- 
ties will not be paid after this year. 



CANADIAN ORE PRICES. 

It is reported that the comparatively 
small block of Canadian iron ore re- 
cently contracted for by an eastern blast 
furnace for next year's delivery, was 
bought at close to 8 cents, delivered, 
per unit of iron at consumer's plant. 
From the standpoint of ore sellers, this 
is looked upon as a favorable price con- 
sidering the grade of the ore disposed 
of and it tends to add weight to the ex- 
pectation that foreign ores will probably 
sell at higher prices next season at east- 
ern seaboard than the present year. Al- 
ready it is understood German and Eng- 
lish iron makers have contracted for 
large quantities of Swedish ore for next 
year's delivery, which on the same mine 
basis would make a pretty high price 
delivered at eastern seaboard. 

Universally in the east there is a be- 
lief that the contracting in eastern do- 
mestic and foreign ores will not begin 
until late spring under present conditions 
of trade. It is certain that with curtail- 
ed operations the average eastern pig 
iron maker has more ore on his hands 
at this time than he had bargained for. 
Some contracts for domestic lump ore 
have been taken out freely and arepuite 
well filled, but considerable furnace ore 
will be carried over until next year. Do- 
mestic shipments in November were not 
as heavy as in October, and this has 
been due largely to the activity of some 
consumers in the latter month taking in 
more ore than their actual needs in order 
to protect themselves against handling 
difficulties in winter. — Iron Trade Re- 
view. 



IRON AND STEEL BOUNTIES. 

The bounties paid upon the manufac- 
ture of iron and steel expired on Decem- 
ber 31, 1910. 



According to the specifications of the 
United States Navy Department, high 
speed tool steel furnished to the depart- 
ment must have the following chemical 
analysis: tungsten, from 18.5 to 19.5 per 
cent.; chromium, from 5.25 to 6 per 
cent.; vanadium, from 0.1 to 0.35 per 
cent.; carbon, from 0.55 to 0.75 per 
cent.; the manganese content must not 
exceed 0.15 per cent.; silicon not more 
than . 0.11 per cent. ; phosphorus not 
more than 0.02 per cent.; and sulphur 
not more than 0.02 per cent. There must 
be no other impurities, and particularly 
not molvbdemim. 



COST CARD. 
The Canadian Billings & Spencer Co., 
Welland, Canadian manufacturers of 

drop- forcings. have an excellent 
cost card system in use, brought 
from the home plant at Hartford, Conn. 
The aceompanv-ing cut shows t ho form 
of card used. All the necessary data 
concerning size, cost, etc., of the article 
is embodied, and. in addition, similar in- 
formation respecting the dies is given. 
From the information under "Dies," 



"The business and Income taxes of the pres- 
ent Assessment Act are especially objection- 
able. 

"Under the income tax, the salaries of the 
officers of incorporated companies are taxed, 
while the Incomes of the same persons under 
a partnership would be free. Thus the in- 
come lax is. In many cases, a penalty on a 
particular form of business organization. 

"The business tax, since it is based on the 
value of the premises occupied, is really a 
double tax on buildings and improvements 
and penalizes the building of large, attrac- 
tive and commodious premises, to the detri- 
ment of the employes, of the building trades, 
and of the general public. 

"On the other band, a moderate increase in 
the tax on the value of all land, whether 
used or unused, inclines the owners to meet 



Due A^frt. lojl4 10 



No. H 



Forging 



Q^r>uM, <»'»>tjt4u Co- 



Cyeu^sV? ^<&^*JfctZ~ 



per lb. -Q-3 



Stock ~&j fc**- ft* 1 * Size g "**% Length 7-5 

Wt. fin. /3 Piece price IO Ay.^O Qv~&00 By < }w\J~o 

Shop exp. — Co»t Price 

Annealed, pickled, trimmed, tumbled, c. d„ h. d., machined 






DIES- 



Finuh "Z. 



CD. 



/ Trim , 



2. Punches , 



DieOrden 



First cost of Dies 26-3 — 



■o 'r Location / *2 Location 

o( Dies 'Clt-C *— ' ol Sample 



<f2o^evft» io ?>Uw«v: 




Cost Card. 



the method of manufacture can be seen, 
as the different kinds of dies and the 
numbers required of each are given. 

In conjunction -with this information 
a photo of the article, photographed be- 
side of scale, is attached to the back of 
the card. This system is in more or less 
common use in the United States, in 
varied forms, but in forms somewhat 
differing from this one. It gives a com- 
plete record of the article, from mate- 
rial to details of appearance, in very 
convenient form. 

LOWER BUSINESS TAX. 
A Tax Reform League has been form- 
ed, Toronto is endeavoring to secure 
sufficient strength to influence the 
changing of the Ontario Assessment 
Act so as to allow municipalities to 
tax buildings, improvements, business 
assessments and incomes, at a lower 
rate than land values. The organiza- 
tion has offices at 75 Yonge St., and is 
sending out the following circular draw- 
ing attention to the objectional fea- 
tures of the present Assessment Tax : 



the offers of those who desire to develop it, 
and when coupled with reduction of the build- 
ing and business tax, results in an increase 
of all productive enterprise. 

"So far from being a new, radical or re- 
volutionary measure, the plan of allowing 
municipalities to reduce taxes on buildings, 
business assessments and incomes, has been 
tried for years in New Zealand, New South 
Wales, and our own Province of British Col- 
umbia with satisfactory results. 

"This measure is eminently conservative, 
since it recognizes that conditions differ in 
different municipalities, and provides that 
each municipality may alter its system only 
after due consideration and on favorable vote 
of the ratepayers. 

"We. therefore, commend this proposal to 
business men, in the hope that they will con- 
sider it in relation to their business interests, 
and support the demand for local control of 
local taxation." 

In Toronto the Association have al- 
ready secured the signatures of a large 
number of manufacturers in favor of 
this move, among these being : 

R. E. Walker & Co., R. E. Walker ; 
Phillips & Wrinch, Chas. C. Phillips, 
president ; House of Hobberlin, A. J. 
Moreland, secy.-treas.; Jacques, Davy 
& Co.; Goldsmiths' Stock Co., Walter 
J. Barr, president ; Richard Southam, 
managing director Southam Press ; 
Hudson Co.; Farmers' 1 Dariry Co., P. P. 



Farmer, Manager ; Noble Scott, print- 
ing ; Marshall Sanitary Mattress Co., 
Alan C. Thompson, mgr.; R. J. Hunter 
& Co., A. E. Brownlee, prop.; Frankel 
Bros.; Carswell Co., R. Carswell, gen- 
eral manager ; General Leather Goods 
Co-, R. H. Cameron, manager ; Na- 
tional iLeather Co., R. R. Corson, secy.- 
treas. 

CENSUS OF CANADIAN MANUFAC- 
TURERS. 
Archibald Blue, chief officer of the Cen- 
sus Department, Ottawa, gives notice 
that on June 1 next year a census will 
be taken of the manufacturers of Can- 
ada It will ascertain the capital em- 
ployed in works in 1910 along with the 
value of land, buildings and plant, the 
kind or class of products of the works 
by quantity or number of finished article 
and their value in the year. These sta- 
tistics will relate generally to factories 
employing five hands or more during 'uhe 
year, but in such industries as 'lour and 
grist mills, brick works, saw and shin- 
gle mills, electric light and power plants, 
and a few others where the value of pro- 
ducts is large in proportion to the num- 
ber of persons employed, returns will be 
required without regard to the number 
of employes. The employes of work will 
include managers, superintendents, etc., 
on salaries ; officers, clerks, etc., on 
salaries ; operatives or workers classed 
as over and under 16 years on wages ; 
and piece-workers employed outside of 
the works. Salaries, wages and pay- 
ments to all officers and employes will 
be entered on the schedule for the cen- 
sus year by sex, and will include the ag- 
gregate weeks employed in the y>at, 
average hours of working time per week, 
and aggregate wages paid to them in 
the year. The aggregate weeks of time 
and the aggregate wages paid will refer 
to the whole body of employes for the 
year while the. average hours of work- 
ing time will refer to an avertge com- 
puted for all employes in the year lor 
one week only. The census of the dairy 
industry, relating to the production of 
butter, cheese, cream and condensed 
milk, will show for each kind of product 
its quantity and selling value, and the 
quantity of milk and cheese used for 
conversion at the factories, the number 
of patrons, and the amount of money 
distributed to them in the year. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



*5 



LESSON IN EFFICIENCY. 

W. R. Towne. president of the Yale & 
Towne Co., Stamford, 'Conn., states that 
by the use of scientific methods and auto- 
matic machinery, his company, within 
the past six years, has achieved increas- 
ed output, decreased labor cost and in- 
creased wages to employes. 



is succeeded by W. Davis, formerly 
chargeman. Mr. Davis is in turn suc- 
ceeded by J. Hollingsworth. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY EDI- 
TORIAL INDEX. 

Beginning with the January, 1911, 
issue the reading matter will be indexed 
separately from the advertising. This is 
done in order to supply each reader 
with a reference index at the end of the 
vear. 



SAFETY DEVICE CATALOGUES 
WANTED. 

Kent McNaughton, Association Rooms, 
Stevens Building, Detroit, Mich., request 
catalogues from manufacturers of safety 
devices. He would like to receive as 
much literature on this subject as pos- 
sible and therefore requests manufac- 
turers whose catalogues show safety de- 
vices in connection with their own ma- 
chines or apparatus to send him copies 
of such publications. 



PERSONAL. 

C. W. Lang, construction superintend 
ent of the Dominion Coal Co., is leaving 
that position to engage in the service of 
the Brown Machine Co., New Glasgow, 
N.S., in which he has purchased an in- 
terest. 

A. W. Wheatley, of the American Lo- 
comotive Works Co., Montreal, has as- 
sumed charge of the Brooks plant of the 
American Locomotive Co., succeeding 
John R. Magarvey, appointed manager 
at Schenectady, N.Y. 

Clarence H. Booth, of Toronto, son of 
George Booth, president of the Booth- 
Coulter Copper & Brass Co., has been 
appointed general manager of manufac- 
turing for the E.M.F. Co., of Detroit, to 
succeed David Hunt, Jr. 

A. C. Hanna, formerly secretary of the 
Dominion Wire Co., Montreal, has gone 
to Winnipeg as sales manager there of 
_the Steel Co., of Canada. 



RECENT ADVANCES IN G. T. R. 

Several important changes have re- 
cently taken place in the management of 
the G.T.R. shops at Battle Creek, Mich., 
Montreal and Toronto. J. C. Garden, 
master mechanic of the G.T.R. shops at 
Point St. Charles, Montreal has been 
transferred to a similar position in the 
new shops at Battle Creek. 

J J. Duguid, formerly general fore- 
man of the Toronto shops, has been ad- 
vanced to the position of master me- 
chanic of the G.T.R, Eastern Division. 
Mr. Duguid's former position is filled by 
William Sealey, formerly foreman of the 
•recting shop, Stratford Mr. Sealey 



WINNIPEG RAILWAY CLUB. 

At the last monthly meeting of the 
Western Canada Railway Club, held at 
the Royal Alexandra, Winnipeg, the 
feature of the evening's proceedings was 
a paper on "The Training of a Railway 
Employee," delivered by H. Martin 
Gower, superintendent of apprentices for 
the Canadian Pacific Railway at Mon- 
treal. The paper, which was of some 
length, dealt with the necessity for 
technical education, gave many statistics 
on the matter, and adduced suggested 
lines of systematized training. It was 
well received by the members present, 
about 100 in number, and a discussion 
followed. 



CENTRAL RAILWAY CLUB. 

The regular meeting of the Central 
Railway and Engineering Club, Toronto, 
was held on Dec 20, when Gordon C. 
Keith, managing editor of Canadian Ma- 
chinery, read a paper on "Modem Ma- 
chine Tool Practice for Maximum Pro- 
duction." 

The following officers were elected for 
1911 : President, G. Baldwin, yardmas- 
ter-, Canada Foundry Co., Toronto; 1st 
vice-president, G. Bannon, chief engi- 
neer city hall; 2nd vice-president, A. 
Taylor, foreman boiler maker. Poison 
Iron Works. 

Executive committee: A. E. Till, fore- 
man C. P. R. ; E. Logan, machinist, 
G.T.R.; C. G. Herring, chief draftsman, 
Consumers Gas Co. ; A. E. Wilkinson, 
Lunkenheimer Co.; A. M. Wickens, chief 
engineer Canadian Casualty and Boiler 
Insurance Co. ; W. E. Cane, supt., Chap- 
man Double Ba" Bearing Co. and A. J. 
Lewkowicz, consulting engineer. Univer- 
sal Gas Co. 

Auditors : J. Herriot, general store- 
keeper, Canada Foundry Co. ; D. Camp- 
bell, storekeeper, Consumers Gas Co., 
and A. W. Human, of Rice Lewis & 
Sons. 



CLAY PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION. 

At the annual meeting of the Clay 
Products Manufacturers Association 
held in Toronto recently, the election of 
officers for the ensuing year took place 
as follows: — Pres., Robert Davies, Tor- 
onto; First Vice-Pres., D. A. Lochrie. 
Toronto; Second Vice-Pres., W. H. Free- 
born. Brantford; Third Vice-Pres., 
David Martin, Thamesville; Sec.-Treas., 
D. 0. McKinnon, Toronto. 



TANNERS' SECTION B. OF T. 

The officers elected at the recent meet- 
ing of the Tanners' section of the Tor- 
onto Board of Trade are: — 

J. J. Lamb, chairman. 



F. B. Clark, vice-chairman. 

F. G. Morley, secretary-treasurer. 

Executive committee 1 — J. C. Breithaupt, 
S. R. Wickett, W. D. Beardmore, George 
McQuay, C. G. Marlatt, Geo. P. Beal, 
George C. H. Lang, A. 0. Beardmore, 
Charles King, A. R. Clarke, E. J. Davis. 

Legislation committee— Chas. King, 
S. R. Wickett, A. R. Clarke, George P. 
Beal, A. O. Beardmore, Hon. E. J. Davis, 
R. M. Beal. 

Transportation committee — J. C. 
Breithaupt, C. G. Marlatt, S. R. Wic- 
kett, John Sinclair, Geo. C. H. Lang, W. 
D. Beardmore, A. O. Beardmore, R. M. 
Beal, Charles King, A. R. Clarke, E. J. 
Davis. Representative to council, A. 0. 
Beardmore. 



WINNIPEG MACHINISTS ELECT 
OFFICERS. 

The International Association of Ma- 
chinists, lodge 122, Winnipeg, held its 
annual election of officers on Dec. 7. 
Great interest was manifested and a 
large proportion of the membership, 
which is now upwards of 300, took part 
in the proceedings. The result was as 
follows : A. Sturrock, president , S. 
Holliday, past president ; G. Johnston, 
vice-presiden/t; H. F. McDonald, record- 
ing secretary ; D. McCallum, financial 
secretary ; A. Robertson, treasurer ; 
S. Miller, constructor ; C. Cross, sen- 
tinel ; E. McGrath, R. F. Shore, and D. 
McCallum, delegates to trades and labor 
council ; S. Holliday, J. Muir and E. 
Emerson, delegates to federated trades 
council. A committee consisting of H. 
F. Macdonald, S. Miller, H. M. McGre- 
gor, A. Young, J. Addison, W. Patter 
son, D. McCulloch, and J. C. Mountjoy, 
was appointed to make arrangements for 
the annual entertainment which will be 
held early in 1911. 



TORONTO MACHINISTS ELECT 
OFFICERS. 

Toronto Lodge 235 of the International 
Association of Machinists elected officers 
for 1911 as follows : President, W. Ha- 
gan ; vice-president, J. Waphott ; re- 
cording secretary, R. McDonald ; finan- 
cial secretary, T. A. White; treasurer, 
W. Dill ; conductor, Wm. Gravell ; inside 
sentinel, E. Cole ; executive committee, 
J. McNaulty, Newton Henders, T. Bur- 
gess, J. Blugerman ; auditors, D. Mont- 
gomery and W. Singer ; trustee, Thomas 
Walsh ; business agent, L. H. Gibbons. 



The general solution of the problem 
of industrial education must be by 
means of public industrial schools, 
where such fundamentals will be taught 
as will prepare boys and girls for the 
industries of the surrounding- territory 
—remembering that the aim and end of 
all education is to train men and wo- 
men to think. 



POWER GENERATION \ APPLICATION 

For Manufacturers. Cost and Efficiency Articles Rather Than Technical. 
Steam Power Plants ; Hydro Electric Development ; Producer Gas, Etc. 



BELT PULLEYS. 

Bj Peter Bain. M.K. 

T.\ the selection of power transmission 

A equipment, much consideration is 

given to power saving ; but while the 

prospective buyer is sacrificing time 

and money, investigating the more or 

expensive devices thai come under 

tin- head, he invariablj overlooks the 

great saving that can be effected by a 

careful selection of pulleys. 

Pulley Factors. 

In determining what pulleys are best 
to use in any equipment, the factors of 
windage, weight, balance, belt contact, 
powerful compression to avoid keyseat- 
ing of shaft, and convenience of handl- 
ing, should have prime consideration, 
as affecting economy of power in subse- 
quent service. A choice of pulleys* which 
fulfills these requirements may mean a 
somewhat higher initial outlay, when 
compared to a choice made without re- 
gard to anything, save suitability of 
diameter, pace, hose, etc., but will 
mean annually, however, a much re- 
duced operating expense in comparison. 
To save much time and annoyance 
later, it is advisable to have all pulleys 
in halves, facilitating as it does, re- 
placements often hurriedly required. 
Comparison of Pulleys. 

Pulleys as manufactured, are of cast 
iron, wrought iron, mild steel, wood and 
iron or steel in combination with wood, 
the shaft bushing perhaps being more 
or less common to all. Iron pulleys of 
all kinds show a distinct loss of power, 
when compared with those in wood, due 
to belt slippage, and amounting in ac- 
nce with test and experiment to 
as much as 50 p.c. Wrought iron or 
steel pulleys with perforated rims do 
not show so unfavorably as those in 
ion. For good licit contact, min- 
imum Blippage, and least power ab 
-01 bed without recourse to belt drees 
nL r - to secure adhesion, the wood rim 
be commend< <l 

Belt dressing should only be used to 
keep belt- pliable, and not to keep 
them from slipping. It- use for other 
than the former purpose, shows faulty 
installation and want of attention on 
th< ' t 

Cast iron pulleys again are objection 
able on account of weight, and require 
in this respect, compared with wood 
pulleys, more power to operate, while 
as favorably placed regarding wind- 
age. Wrought iron pulleys while light, 
and attractive as regards windage, do 



not give satisfactory balance, especially 
when split, and are not on the same 
plane as a properh designed wood 
pulley. 

It must of course be borne in mind 
that there are good and bad features in 
wood pulleys. Belt contact, reduced 
weight, and facility of handling, are 
generally speaking strong points in their 
favor, but unless at least the equiva- 
lent windage of a well designed cast 
iron pulley be had, the other gains 
may be almost all offset. The properly 
designed wood pulley should be the 
equal of other types in their best fea- 
tures, and their superior otherwise. 
Windage. 

An absence of windage is not always 
a feature of wood pulleys, a circum- 
stance unfavorable to their more uni- 
versal adoption, and responsible for 
their career being prematurely closed in 
many installations. The elimination of 
this difficulty is not insurmountable, 
and already much has been done, so 
much in fact, as to bring the wood 
pulley windage on a par at least with 
that of the best in cast iron pulley de- 
sign, and putting it in a class by itself 
for cheap operating cost in power trans- 
mission, with an ultimate influencing of 
its larger adoption. The improvement 
necessary in the reduction or absence of 
windage in wood pulleys, lies in the 
arm attachment between rim and hub. 
To get equal results, the arms should 
be of a shape corresponding to those 
of cast iron or somewhat similar, the 
material light, rigid, reliable, and at- 
tached securely to rim and hubs. Arms 
of eold drawn seamless steel tubing, 
pressed into ribbed form, and forced 
•into a taper hole on bases of a mallea- 
ble iron hub. these upset and headed 
over on end. constitute a fastening 
which has come under the writer's 
notice as having much to recommend 
it. The arm and rim attachment is 
housed within the rim, and consists of 
idle pure embracing the flattened 
end of arm, and fastened to it by steel 
pin- driven into rim. 

Belt Pulley Speeds. 

The wood pulley has advantage over 
those of iron or steel, in that it can be 
run at a much higher speed, ordinarily 
three times as fast, while experience 
show- that it is impracticable to run 
pulleys of iron or steel for mill and 
factory purposes at greater rim speed 
than five to six thousand feet per min- 
ute, roughly one mile per minute. As 



showing what can. be done, a wood rim 
pulley with iron spider has recently 
been made and tested by the Dodge 
Mfg. Co., to run safely at five and one- 
half miles per minute. Such a result is 
intensely interesting, and serves to 
emphasize the benefits to be derived 
from a more extensive use of well de- 
signed wood pulley equipment. 

Shaft Attachment. 

The shaft attachment of pulleys i's a 
matter of some importance, necessitat- 
ing as it does, the cutting of the key- 
ways, the use of set screws, or reliance 
on the compression of the bushing- 
alone. 

Solid cast iron pulleys invariably re- 
quire keyseating of the shaft, the only 
exception being for very light loads. 
No keyseating means a reduction of out- 
lay, a rapid convenient attachment, and 
an unimpaired shaft strength. It must 
never be forgotten that keyseating a 
shaft reduces its strength at that 
point, and in the case of cold rolled 
shafting, much of which is used in 
power transmission, and which depends 
on its unbroken surface for mainten- 
ance of comparative strength, keyseat- 
ing is highly detrimental, placing it 
inferior to turned shafting under the 
same treatment. 

Hurry jobs call for easy yet effective 
fixings, and cold rolled shafting and 
keyless pulleys do much to help out 
awkward situations. 

Hub Bushings. 
Cast iron bushings with large bear- 
ing surface are best adapted for all 
pulleys, because when properly com- 
pressed, they exert a positive contact 
with the shaft. The adaptability to 
compression depends much on the elas- 
ticity of the hub material, and a mal- 
leable iron hub, light vet strong, 
seems to give with the cast iron bush- 
ing, results hard to surpass in the mat- 
ter of keyless shaft attachment. 

Conclusions. 

The belt pulley question is of wide 
interest, and does not have that impor- 
tance in the estimation of large and 
small users (the latter particularly) 
that it should. With the various man- 
ufacturers there lies the looked for im- 
provement in pulley development, which 
will give the user a highly efficient ser- 
vice and convenience, leaving first cost 
if high, to be justified by ultimate 
operating results. 









CANADIAN MACHINERY 



27 



G. P. & H. ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE. 

'"pHE accompanying illustrations show 
two views of the new electric loco- 
motive recently purchased by the Gait, 
Preston and Hespeler Street Railway Co. 
This company operates some 30 cars on 
a standard gauge interurban line, 21 
miles in length, connecting the above 
points with the towns of Freeport, Cen- 
treville, Berlin and Waterloo. The 
power station and repair shops are lo- 
cated at Preston. The railway traverses 




Fig. 1 — Electric Locomotive. 



a farming country and does a thriving 
business in both local and through pas- 
senger and freight service. 

Several years since the G. P. & H. 
Ry. Co. purchased from the Westing- 
house Electric & Mfg. Co. a quadruple 
equipment, consisting of four No. 93-A 
direct-current motors with a nominal 
rating of 60 h.p. each at 600 volts, for 
a locomotive similar to the one shown, 
but of smaller capacity. Its operation 
has been eminently satisfactory in every 
respect and the recent order for a 
larger locomotive of the same general 
characteristics argues strongly for the 
excellence of design and low mainten- 
ance charges of this type of slow speed 
freight locomotive. 

Much has been said about the imprac- 
ticability of electric freight haulage but 
the steadily increasing sales of slow 
speed electric locomotives especially de- 
signed for freight service and the invari- 
ably favorable reports of operation is 
affirmative evidence of the most force- 
ful nature. There are many interurban 
electric roads tapping sparsely settled 
farming districts and outlying towns 
not favorably located on main steam 
trunk lines, which could develop a hig'hJ T 
profitable express and freight traffic 
with the aid of a suitable electric loco- 
motive. 

The G. P. & H. locomotive shown was 
built by the Baldwin Locomotive Co.. 
and the complete electrical equipment 
furnished by the Westinghouse Electric 
& Mfg. Co., Pittsburg. It is designed 
for the standard 4 ft. 8i in. gauge and 
provided with double swivel trucks. The 
wheel base is 29 feet and the overall 
dimension 36 feet and it weighs com- 
plete, 100,000 pounds. The gear ratio of 
16.57 gives a normal speed of 8.25 m.p.h. 
at which speed a tractive effort of 18,- 
200 lbs. is developed. The maximum 



tractive effort is 25,000 lbs. The loco- 
motive carries a quadruple equipment 
consisting of four No. 308-B-2 interpole 
direct current railway motors having a 
nominal rating of 100 h.p. each, 01' a 
total of 400 h.p. at 600 volts. These 
motors are .fitted with special windings 
adapting them particularly for slow 
speed locomotive service. Standard 

nose suspension is used. 

The Westinghouse unit switch control 
was provided. Two master controllers 
are supplied one in each end of the 
cab. These controllers carry only the 
very small current from a storage bat- 
tery, for exciting the electro-magneti- 
cally actuated needle valve which admits 
air at 70 lbs. pressure to the air cylin- 
ders of the unit switch. The action of 
each switch is therefore positive and in- 
dependent of fluctuations of the line 
voltage. It not infrequently happens on 
interurban and stubend lines that the 
voltage at points far distant from trol- 
ley feeders is as low as 200 volts when 
the motors are in operation. Under 
such extreme or even less severe condi- 
tions solenoid operated contractors, de- 
pending upon the line voltage for their 
contact pressure, are very apt to give 



necessary therefore to cut the 1G in. 
water main, which was suspended un- 
derneath the bridge. 

Instead of adopting the old methods 
of cutting the pipe with a hard chisel, 
or boring a number of holes and then 
sawing it through, the task was ac- 
complished by means of an oxy-acetylene 
flame. The Davis-Bournonville system 
was used under the direction of Mr. 
Fennel. When the flame was turned on 
the f-inoh metal it rapidly bit into it. 
This operation was completed inside of 
fifteen minutes. A second cutting had 
to be made some eighteen inches fur 
ther back to take off a section of the 
pipe, to prevent it catching on the, 
abutments when the bridge was moved. 
The operation had to be conducted at 
both ends of the bridge, and the whole 
work was accomplished inside an hour. 

AIR HEADER. 

The accompanying cut shows a con- 
venient form of header for use in dis- 
tributing compressed air from air mains, 
where the number of tools at any par- 
ticular spot are more than two or three. 




Air Header. 



trouble due to looseness and arcing at 
the contacts. With air operated swit- 
ches all such possibilities are eliminated 
and the greatest reliability under all 
conditions assured. 

Fig. 2 shows this locomotive hauling 
a loaded train weighing 1,040 tons on 
the experimental tracks of the Westing- 
house Co., near Trafford City, Pa. This 
was the heaviest load available at the 



This header permits of eight lines of 
hose being taken off from the one spot, 
and is a device found very convenient 
in the shop and yards of the Colling- 
wood Shipbuilding Co., Collingwood. 
Ont., especially when constructing- the 
boat on the ways, as a multitude of 
pneumatic hammers, and drills arc in 
use. 

Pipe A is connected by a T to the 




Fig. 



-Electric Locomotive, with Normal Draw Load. 



time, though it was evident that under 
similar conditions the locomotive would 
have handled a 2.000 ton train with 
equal ease. 

OXY-ACETYLENE CUTTING. 

Recently the bridge over the Don 
river, Toronto, was moved to make 
room for another structure. It was 



air main. The header itself. B, is a 
cast iron body with two sets of holes 
at right angles, staggered, thus facilitat- 
ing hose connections. From each of 
these eight bosses on the header, the 
hose pipes lead out, with an indepen- 
dent valve, C, on each. The pipe A 
may be given a valve as well, permittini: 
of the shutting off of the whole head. 



28 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



GnadianMachinery 

^ manufacturing News^ 

\ monthlv newspaper devoted to machinery and manufacturing interests 
mechanical and electrical trades, the foundry, technical progress, ecantruejon 
Md ■mprovement. and to all use.* of power developed from steam, gas. elec 
rioity. compressed a.r and «ater in Canada . 

The MacLean Publishing Co., Limited 



W.L. EDMONDS. .Vtc-Pnidnt 

H v TYRRELL. Toronto Business Manager 

G C KEITH, ME.. B.Sc. Toronto Managing Editor 

PETER BAIN. ME.. Toronto 



Associate Editor 



OFFICES : 

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London - 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

Phone Central 12960 

E. J. Dodd 

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SUBSCRIPTION RATE. 

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change in address, giving both old and new. 



FRANCE 

Paris John F. Jones & Co.. 

31 bis. Faubourg Montmartre, 

Paris. France 



Vol. VII. 



January, 1911 



No. 1 



EFFICIENCY OF RAILROAD SHOPS. 

Discussing the paper on "Modem Machine Tool Prac- 
tice for Maximum Production," read before the Central 
Railway and Engineering- Club, C. A. Jefferis, General 
Superintendent of Consumers' Gas Co., Toronto, said 
mat tne mecnauic in the ordinary small shop was not a» 
fully acquainted with the developments in machine tools 
and high speed steels as the one employed in a railroad 
shop, i'his is a very important statement in view of the 
tact that the daily papers and others would have us be- 
lieve that the railroads are wasteful, uneconomical and 
unscientific. Supporting this latter view, Louis D. Bran- 
deis representing the eastern shippers before the inter- 
state Commerce Commission, declared the railroad meth- 
ods lacked technical skill ai tilic accuracy, that by 
the application of these the cost ol operation would be 
enormously reduced. The rigid economy of scientific 
uietnous Sensed upon ordinary industries by the pressure 
of competition, has not, according to Mr. Brandeis, de- 
veloped among the railways to a proportionate extent. 

The argument can be answered by one of his own 
references. lie cited the case of the Santa Fe railroad, 
giving figures showing that in six years a saving of $5,- 
bHKI,UUU was effected by improvements in methods. 

The Santa Fe railroad is a most progressive one, as 
are also such railroad-, as the New York Central, Canad- 
ian Pacitie and Grand Trunk railroads. As for the ear, 
locomotive and repair shops of these railroads, the 
methods are both scientific and economical. Men are 
technically trained under the supervision of the com- 
panies. Apprenticeship systems with educational cli 
are features of the four above mentioned railroad.-. The 
result is that railroad practice is modern in every par- 
ticular. 

When high speed steel was introduced the railroads 
were among the tirst to take hold of it. The machine 
tools used in railroad shop practice have developed to 



such an extent that the companies are waiting for some 
genius of the Taylor type to develop a still better steel 
than that with which we are now acquainted. The rail- 
road shops of the G. T. R. at Stratford, Ont., and Battle 
(reek. Mich., and the ('. 1'. R. Angus shops at Montreal 
are examples of the result of trained minds seeking the 
In si shops and equipment procurable. 

While the railroads are not responsible for all the 
improvements in machine tools, still the manufacturer 
using metal working machinery should keep watch on the 
methods of the railroads. They are always ready to give 
anyone desiring it the benefit of their experiences. In 
almost every issue of Canadian Machinery railroad shop 
methods are given, showing the trend of modern practice 
in railroad shops. While the various industries have 
been making improvements, the railroad shops, too, have 
been keeping pace with the advances in the mechanical 
field. 

COMMON COURTESY. 

That common courtesy pays is beyond a doubt, whether 
in the shop or office. The apprentice and workman owes 
it to his foreman as also does the foreman to those under 
him. A foreman is responsible to the management for 
tin- workmanship and behavior of the employes. His in- 
structions should be carried out carefully. The foreman 
i> the medium through which a workman secures advance- 
ment, and be sure he will assist the man who is square 
and courteous to him. 

Then the management will secure loyal foremen and 
workmen by being courteous to the employes. They must 
depend on the men to turn out good work, and when 
treated with consideration, the management need never 
be ashamed of the workmanship. 

There is still another point. Those entrusted with 
correspondence should be courteous. Brevity is being 
aimed at in all business correspondence, but do not. let 
the shortness of the letter prevent it being courteous. 
A letter should be written so that a favorable impression 
is at once created. Be sure a study of common courtesy 
in letters will result in making friends and securing 
business. 

HEALTH AND CARE OF EMPLOYES. 

The health of employes in manufacturing establish- 
ments constitutes a factor in economical production which 
is highly worthy of consideration. The workman who 
has to be absent a part of the time because of bodily ail- 
ment must necessarily upset shop routine; if his work 
is highly specialized, so that it is difficult to fill his 
place temporarily, the result may be serious in disturb- 
ing the balance of manufacturing. Even if a man con- 
tinues his employment despite impaired health his use- 
fulness depreciates perceptibly. 

Progress in shop sanitation has of late been rapid. 
Good light, ample ventilation, better heating apparatus 
and approved toilet conveniences have been carefully 
provided. Manufacturers have kept pace with the gen- 
eral movement to better the condition of those whose 
days must be spent in factories. Environments have 
n made satisfactory in most trades, and reading, rest 
and lunch rooms have been provided. 

An excellent beginning in ' the direction of looking 
after the health is being made in the public schools by 
instruction in the hygiene of the body and by a system 
of medical and dental inspection. Many cities employ 
physicians to inspect the schools regularly for cases of 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



29 



sickness, defective hearing and sight, etc. In a few places 
high class dentists are provided to make compulsory ex- 
amination of the teeth of children and to furnish treat- 
ment free of charge or at small cost. If this system 
spreads through the country, as it is believed it will, the 
workman will be blessed. It is advocated that the edu- 
cation of employees, especially of young persons, .in this 
direction would bear profitable fruit. 

In a small way this sort of work is aready going on. 
The foreman who takes an interest in those under him 
will advise skilled treatment for any trouble that comes 
to his attention, especially if it causes the employe to 
lose time. It is confidently prophesied that the general 
modern movement will go much farther than the point it 
has now reached, as the employer assumes a more direct 
interest in his working people, impelled by the combined 
motives of human kindness and the practical business 
advantage that comes with the services of employes in 
the full possession of their health. If this condition is 
brought about it will be but following along the same 
line as that of the shop surgeon of the present day. a 
side of industrial management which is becoming common, 
and which is supplemented in large works by well equip- 
ped private hospitals. Already in the United States, 
says The Iron Age. there has grown out of this practice 
the employment of a regular shop physician who looks 
after employes when they are ill as well as when they 
have been injured. The best of the cotton mills of the 
South are said to have adopted this system as a most im- 
portant element in keeping together their communities of 
workers. 

There is also the work to the injured. In a number 
of Canadian industries branches of the St. John's Am- 
bulance Association have been formed. On December 21, 
1910, an Ontario branch of this association was instituted, 
a Dominion branch having been formed Feb., 1910. 
Branches have been organized in the east and western 
branches will now be formed. 

A branch of this association was organized some years 
ago in the works of the John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas. 
and in the C. P. R. Angus Shops. Montreal. In the latter 
shop it has been found to work so satisfactorily in giving 
first aid to the injured, that it is being extended along 
the whole system from coast to coast. S. A. Gidlow, the 
general secretary, has been establishing classes in the 
various shops with this in view. The objects of the 
association as pointed out in Canadian Machinery some 
months ago are: — Instruction in "first aid," and prompt 
assistance to those suffering from accident or sudden ill- 
ness, instruction in the use of stretchers, hygiene, sanita- 
tion and relief of sick and injured. 

Special attention is paid to accidents in the shops. 
During the six months ending July 31st last there were 
2.033 industrial accidents officially reported in Canada, 
f?56 of which were fatal. There are in Canada annually 
3,000 deaths from accident, and it is estimated that there 
are 17,000 accidents which are not fatal. There is no 
doubt that many lives would be saved, much suffering 
lessened if the principles of first aid to the injured were 
generally known, and good use made of the precious 
minutes before the doctor arrives. 

The whole matter is a question of shop economies. 
It is certainly to the advantage of industrial establish- 
ments to have contented, healthy men employed. And 
when accidents do occur, as they will sometimes in the 
best shops, the saving of the life of an employe or the 
giving of first aid assistance which will hasten his recovery 
and return to work, will unodubtedly help in making 



loyal, contented, healthy employes, who will serve the 
employer faithfully and with the best of his ability. 



HAVE SUFFICIENT EQUIPMENT. 

The writer entered a good sized shop recently, and as 
he passed through the shop he heard one workman greet 
another: "Say, Bill, let me use your vise a minute." 
Investigation showed that all the vises were constantly 
in use, and that there was considerable changing around 
to allow another to use a vise. 

It would be interesting to calculatl^the cost of keep- 
ing men standing around waiting for a vise while another 
used it. It would not take many days' savings to pav 
for that vise. By not providing sufficient the price of 
quite a number will be lost in a year. 

The question of wasted time should always be kept 
in mind. A careful study should be made of the require- 
ments, and in the selection of a number of vises, or in 
the choosing of drills or other machinery, the elimination 
of unnecessary waste in the handling of work should be 
kept constantly in mind. It will be found, if this is dime. 
thai the cost of production will be greatly lowered. 



TOPICS OF THE MONTH. 

From time to time we receive letters from friends of 
Canadian Machinery telling how Canadian Machinery 
had helped them. Our circulation representatives are 
met courteously and assisted in interesting others in the 
paper. As an instance of the usefulness of Canadian 
Machinery to superintendents and foremen, we cite the 
following : 

A foreman in one of Brantford's up-to-date machine 
shops told a represntative that he found Canadian Ma- 
chinery invaluable. In order to illustrate how he made 
use of the paper, he described a job somewhat out of the 
ordinary, that came into the shop recently. He remem- 
bered seeing a similar job described in Canadian Ma- 
chinery some time before, and as he kept a file of them, 
he readily hunted up the article which was in the 
"Methods and Devices" Department, and completed the 
work without difficulty. 

• • • • • 

Beginning with the present issue of Canadian Ma- 
chinery, a series of articles will appear monthly, touching 
the selection, installation, operation and efficiency of 
power transmission equipment. Every effort will be put 
forth to make the treatment of the various subjects po- 
pular and helpful to our wide circle of readers, users and 
operators. Power transmission i<5 inseparably connected 
with manufactures of every description, and has in conse- 
quence a large claim to attention. The subject this month 
is "Belt Pulleys," to be followed in our February num- 
ber bv Rab on "Belts and Belt Drives." 



SEASON'S GREETINGS. 

IN the year that lias passed we have made many 
new friends among superintendents, master 
mechanics, foremen, students and men interest- 
ed in mechanical pursuits. Old friendships, too. 
have been strongly cemented, and we take this 
opportunity of expressing our cordial wish that 
the New Year on which we have entered may bring 
you great happiness and unlimited prosperity. 

The Editors and Managers. 
January 1. 1911. 



FOUNDRY PRACTICE and EQUIPMENT 

Practical Articles for Canadian Foundrymen and Pattern Makers, and 
News of Foundrymen's and Allied Associations. Contributions Invited. 



SKELETON AND SWEEP PATTERNS 

By F. S. Cubbig* 

When only one casting or a very few 

eastings are required, a* skeleton pattern 

is used or the mold is swept up by means 

ps. 

In Pig. 1 a skeleton pattern for a pipe 

bend is represented. First two boards 

are sawn out the shape of the pipe, and 

_ past the flanges to include the 

■ e dow eled to- 

r. then circular pieces are sawn out 

t.> make up the dian ; he pipe 

at from 2 in. to 8 in. apart along the 

full length of the pipe and core prints. 

The flanges 1> b are cut out to tit over 

the boards a a. A strike or strickle is 

the diameter of the pipe for the 

h idy, and one smaller in diameter to suit 

the core prints. The molder completes 

pattern by filling in between the cir- 

ciilar pieces c c c. with green sand and 

striking off any projecting portions of 

sand by means of the strickle D, and 

_ it with parting sand and then 

- ready to be used as an ordinary 

pattern. 

The core for the skeleton pattern is 

generally jusi -wept up with a strickle. 

S a tlat board cut out parallel to the 




; f g 



Flgf. l Skeleton and Sweep Patterns. 

strickle cul out to i be 

diameter of ti • The board is fast- 

ened to the core plate and the core sand 
on the plate so that it may be 
(trickled, as shown at c, I - 

v7J en n ftki patttern and 

core frame for a straight piece of pipe. 
the pattern is made on the principle 



shown in Fig. 1. a, but the core frame 
i- generally made as shown in Fig. 1, f, 
and a straight strickle used over the half- 
circles g g. making one-half core at a 
time on a core plate. 

When a boss or small inlet or outlet 
i> required, a piece is turned the requir- 
ed shape 'and is secured to the circular 
pieces on pattern at the place where it is 
wanted and the green sand filled in under 
it between the sections. Or if a,n inlet 
or outlet piece is required on the inside 
of the pipe a straight piece is screwed 
to the ends g g, and the boss or pipe in- 
let or outlet, as it may be. is secured to 
it and the core built up and strickled 
the same as previously described. 

In making very large pulleys or fly- 
wheels, they are very often swept up by 
means of sweeps, the arms and hubs be- 
i i i i> ■ made in a eore box. 

Take a pulley having six arms, as 
shown in Fig. 2. a core box is first made 
for the arms. This box must be at least 
six inches wide, as it requires G in. for the 
one-sixth part of hub. which is included 
in the core box. as shown at c. Fig.2 fb) 
D being half of pulley arm. 

It is next necessary to make a section 
of the rim of the pulley about 2 to 3 ft. 
long, the flanges E E, Fig. 2 A being 
screwed on. Two pieces of 1 in. stuff 
about 4 in. wide are then secured to rim 
segment, as shown in elevation. Fig. 2 
(D). The distance f being the radius 
of the pulley required. In molding this 
pulley the molder first sweeps up a flat 
bed. a hub 12 in. diam. and 2V-> in. deep 
is then placed in the centre and the sand 
built up around it, out to within about 
li in. of the outside diam. of wheel and 
swepl level, then the hub is drawn out 
and the arm cores are set on 'the green 
sand, the two half-cores to make a com- 
plete arm having been pasted together. 
A jpindle or shaft is next driven into 
the centre of the mold, to be used as a 
guide to use sweep (D) Fig. 2. the sweep 
being connected to spindle by means of 
the hole IT in strips E E, Fig. 2 (D). 

The sweep is then sel in position and 
the sand rammed in from the sweep 
- gmenl to the hub of pulley and up to 
the fop of sweep al rim and to top of 
arm cores at centre of mold, then the 
sweep is moved it- own length, less an 
inch or so around, and the operation re- 
peated until the inside is rammed up 
and then the pieces E E are removed and 
the sand rammed up all around the out- 
wde, The »weep pattern and spindle are 



then drawn out and cake cores set all 
around the top of the rim and a core to 
form the top of hub is made and set on 
and the mold is finished. Of course, 'the 
molder has to make his own provision 
for gating and venting, etc., but as we 






Skeleton and Sweep Patterns. 



are only considering pattern work we 
will leave that part alone. 

VANADIUM STEELS IN LOCOMO- 
TIVE PRACTICE. 

Several foundries are now specializing 
on vanadium steel castings for locomo- 
riive work, and in the past three years 
have turned out a large tonnage not 
only for frames, but for driving wheel 
centres, cross heads, cylinders, and 
other parts in which dynamic strength 
is particularly desired. 

Several of the large railroad systems 
specified several years ago vanadium 
cast steel frames in a small way for 
trial, and are now specifying it as a 
standard on all new equipment. Another 
larg-e system had much trouble from 
front end failures, but is said to have 
overcome the difficulty by substituting 
vanadium cast steel front ends with 
change of section. 

One of the large railroad systems of 
this country was having an excessive 
number of failures of wrought iron 
frames and the shops were with diffi- 
culty keeping the engines in commission, 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



3i 



It was decided to replace sections of 
the wrought iron frames in the zone of 
breakage by pieces of vanadium cast 
steel welded into place. It is said that 
these parts never broke, but that in the 
same frames breaks subsequently oc- 
curred in the original wrought iron 
portion. Other vanadium steel sections 
were then welded in, and gave no 
trouble. It was later decided to make 
the entire frame of vanadium cast 
steel, and the service from these frames 
was so satisfactory that for new loco- 
motives vanadium cast steel frames 
were specified. 

INJURIES AND DISEASES OF 
MOLDERS. 

The Giesserei Zeitung dis'cusses the 
possibility of injuries that lie in the 
tapping of furnaces, transporting and 
pouring of molten metal, spattering and 
sputtei-ing of metal, and in the breaking 
of cranes, conveying apparatus and 
cleaning of castings. The article has 
been translated by Castings and is re- 
produced herewith. If molds are not 
dried sufficiently, possibility of explos- 
ion enters in touching molten iron with 
water. This is increased by it he poor 
lighting found in so many foundries, 
and the fact that near closing time more 
haste and less care is used by workmen. 
Blowing powdered carbon and coal dust 
on molds, envelops workmen in coal 
dust, while cleaners are surrounded by 
clouds of burned sand and coal dust or 
carbon when cleaning castings. 

There is also the formation of gases 
near cupolas and influence of heat radi- 
ation. The cupola gases contain from 15 
to 17 per cent. CO, and 10 to 15 per 
cent, carbonic acid. Usually cupolas lie 
at an outer w T all of foundry, and the 
tapping hole is inside of shop, charging 
door is outside and a little higher. 
Charging should never be done directly, 
as insufficient ventilation and escape of 
gases may cause diseases through the 
poisonous gases. If in such an atmos- 
phere the workman has to cany heavy 
charges, due to lack of mechanical con- 
veyors, his vitality to resist these gases 
is lowered to the danger limit. 

To avoid inhalation of dust in clean- 
ing castings, a sand-blast with suction 
device is best for use. With very large 
castings a pneumatic scraper might be 
used instead. In either case, suction de- 
vices should be near cleaning tables to 
suck in dust at once. 

Statistics for pourers and molders in 
German foundries show that from 40 to 
50 per cent, suffer from diseases. 
Among these are diphtheria, tonsilitis, 
acute rheumatism, heart diseases, acute 
indigestion, acute and chronic bron- 
chitis, and tuberculosis. Besides, they 
show a larger number of sufferers from 
eye troubles, burns, poisonings and kid- 



ney diseases. The death rate is not 
quite as high ; causes aside from tuber- 
culosis, being chronic kidney diseases 
and suicide. 

In preventing burns on the feet the 
foot-gear plays the main role. Out of 
247 cases of burns due to molten metal, 
58.7 per cent, went on laced shoes, and 
16.6 per cent, on low shoes. 

Sommerfeld in his investigations 
found that out of 100 'deaths and sick- 
nesses in foundry workers, 62.5 per cent, 
came on organs of respiration of the 
pourers, 60 per cent, of cleaners. The 
average age of the former is 45.9 years, 
of the latter 48 years, showing both 
branches of foundry work to be equally 
unhealthy. 

Rooms for cleaning castings should be 
lofty, light, broad, artificially ventilated. 
In winter the room for molders should 
be heated, as they are especially exposed 
to colds, handling cold and wet material. 
A number of accidents can be lowered 
if molds are not placed too closely and 
enough space is left between them for 
passage. Cleaners' should wear masks or 
at least protection goggles. Where no 
suction is provided in cleaning of cast- 
ings, workmen should have small res- 
pirators to prevent lungs from inhaling 
dust. Frequent use of soap and water 
should also be impressed on workmen. 

PNEUMATIC TESTS OF PIPE.* 

By William R. Conrad. 
T AST spring two separate corpora- 
tions wishing to put in some pipe 
lines that would' be absolutely tight when 
laid and in service, ordered from two 
separate manufacturers a quantity of 
cast iron pipe, each purchaser specifying 
in addition to the usual hydrostatic test 
that each pipe be carefully tested with 
air. compressed to 50 pounds per square 
inch, and that while under this pressure 
soap and water suds be applied so as to 
reveal open or porous iron or defects 
which the hydraulic test had not de- 
veloped. Because of this additional test 
and it being known that air will, when 
compressed, work through metals more 
rapidly than water, it was determined 
by the manufacturers to use nothing but 
the best grades of iron that would give 
a close and uniform texture. 

The results were that in one case there 
were 4,954 pipes tested either hydrosta- 
tically or pneumatically; of this number 
27 leaked under hydraulic pressure and 
272 leaked under pneumatic pressure, 
those leaking under pneumatic pressure 
baring already passed the hydraulic 
test; this makes a percentage of leaks 
of the whole quantity tested 0.545 of 1 
per cent, for the hydraulic and approxi- 
mately 5.5 per cent, for the pneumatic. 

• Paper read before Central States Water Works 

Alteration, by William R- Conrad, Burlington, N.J, 



or slightly over 6 per cent, for the two 
tests. In the other case there were 2,- 
737 pipes tested, of which 14 leaked un- 
der hydraulic and 186 leaked under pneu- 
matic pressure, the percentage being 
0.511 of 1 per cent, for the hydraulic 
and approximately 6.8 per cent, for the 
pneumatic, or about 7.3 for both. Ana- 
lyzing further, you will notice that the 
percentage of hydraulic leaks to the to- 
tal number was but about 6.2 per cent, 
of the total number of leaks, taking both 
jobs together. This proportion, however, 
would undoubtedly have been more even- 
ly divided had the hydraulic pressure in 
testing been maintained for a longer 
period of time per pipe, for. as previous- 
ly stated, air compressed will find its 
way through open or porous metal more 
rapidly than water compressed, but in 
view of the fact that all of the pipes 
were to be subjected to an air test subse- 
quent to the hydraulic, both manufactur- 
ers depended more on developing leaks 
with the air than with the water. While 
it is true that both lots of pipe were laid 
for the purpose of carrying gas, the writ- 
er believes that in these days when the 
tendency is with all waterworks to 
operate as economically as possible and 
with as little loss of the commodity be- 
ing dealt in, for the purpose of conserv- 
ing the supplies already in use to their 
fullent extent before looking for new 
sources, or in considering the most eco- 
nomical way of conserving new sources 
of supply which are being considered, we 
should all consider seriously whether re- 
quiring a longer hydrostatic test, or in 
addition to the hydrostatic a pneumatic 
test of the pipe we purchase and lay, 
would not be good economy, even at the 
risk of having to pay slightly more for 
our material. In other words, whether 
the best is none too good, both in ma- 
terial and in laying, while the first cost 
may seem high will it not effect economies 
of both operation and commodity that 
will eventually prove considerable of a 
saving? 



The Mechanical World states that alu- 
minum may be etched by the following 
etching fluid ; alcohol, 4 ounces ; acetic 
acid, 6 ounces ; antimony chloride, 4 
ounces, and water, 40 ounces. 

Don't fail to clean away all dirt and 
chips before screwing a chuck or face- 
plate on the lathe, and if the screw is 
dry, put on a few drops of oil. 

A rust-proofing process for iron and 
steel, called Coslettising, cv.i-isis in 
boiling the articles to be treated in a 
solution of 1 gallon of water, 1 ounces 
of phosphoric acid and 1 ounce of iron 
filings. By this means a black coating 
is produced on the iron or steel surface 
which protects it from atmospheric or 
other corrosive influences. 



INDUSTRIAL \ CONSTRUCTION NEWS 

Establishment or Enlargement of Factories, Mills, Power Plants, Etc.; Construc- 
tion of Railways, Bridges, Etc.; Municipal Undertakings; Mining News. 



i .unuir> i»mi Machine Shop. 

MONTREAL- Two blocks have been cleared 
for the erection of the Canadian Tube .\ Iron 
Company's works. This company is capital- 
ised Mt $1,000,000. The Intention is to have 
ihe first store] completed by early summer 
uexl year, and at once some machinery wUl 
stalled and manufacturing will start. 
while the rest of the building is bi 
pleted. When the whole works are In opera- 
tion 400 or more men will be employed. 

PORONTO The I ilnion Gasoline Engine 

Co has been Incorporated, with head office 
here. The capital is (75,000, and the pro- 
visional directors are: A. N. Morme. R 11. 

Whiteway, M. Yetmnn G N. Shaver and li. 
Q Paulin. 

WALKERYILLE The Gramm Motor- 

truck Co.. recently incorporated for >100.- 
inmi are making complete motor trucks here 
The plant of the Gramm Motortruck Com- 
pany of Canada comprises some 30.000 square 
feet" of space, and the company owns ad- 
ditional adjacent land in the best locality 
in WalkervlUe, which will be called into 
requisition as conditions warrant. the 
lent of the company is II. W. Acason, 
who is also Vice-Presidenl of the Walker- 
ville Carriage Goods Co., and a member of 
the firm of Acason, Galusba & Rudd, makers 
of automobile tops and trimmings. John 
rr Vice-President; I. K. Webster. Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. F. II. Galusha. the 
general manager, is also president of the 
WalkervlUe Carriage Goods Co., and one of 
the firm of Acason, Galusha & Rudd. 

MONTREAL The National Acme Co. are 
installing Chapman double ball bearings in 
their new plant here, and also in the Crown 
Laundry. 

TILLSONBURG, Ont.— Gaskell & Co., re- 
cently from England, have purchased the ma- 
chine shop and foundry of II. F. McCrea. It 
is the intention of the new company to do 
general repairing, and also manufacture some 
general lines, when they become better ac- 
quainted with the requirements of the coun- 
try. Mr. McCrea is retiring from active 
work. lie has been a reader of Canadian 
Machinery for many years and has renewed 
his subscription, because he still wants to 
keep in touch with Canadian manufacturing 
interests. 

SUDBURY, Ont.— The Sudbury Construc- 
• on .V Machine Co. are building an addition 
to their plant to be used as a foundry. This 
company manufactures mining machinery. 

SAULT STE. MARIE.— The Northern 
Poundry & Machine Co. have completed Lheir 
blacksmith shop and foundry which re- 
place those destroyed by fire some time ago. 
The plant has been fully equipped for the 
manufacture of boilers, etc. 

FORT WILLIAM. (Jut.— The various foun- 
dries and machine shops are busy with coil- 

j for the C.P.R. and C.N.R. The I 
dlau iron Corporation have 300 men employed 

and are running to their full capacity. 

METEGHAN RIVER, N.S.— J. P. Robi- 
'•haud is building a foundry and machine 
step here. 

BARNIA, 'int.— The J. B. Hieks Gas Engine 
• ill establish a works here subject to the 

ratepi thorizlng a grant of $5,000 to 

the company. 
MONTREAL Que The Lightning Furnace 
which baa taken over the assets rod 
business of the Compagnle de la Fournalse 

L'Eelalr, "HI establish a foundry for the 

manufacture of furnaces and Implements con 
nected there* 

HALIFAX, N.8. At a meeting of the share- 
holders of the Silliker Car Co., held In Hali- 
fax on in-. -ember 6, it wns decided to accepl 
the' amended offer of F. B. McCurdy to pur- 
,i,,. assets and bus ness The offer In- 
cludes an undertaking to pul $600,000 new 
capital In the business The McCurdy Inter- 
will pure! - ■ f the first pre- 
ferred T per cent stock. 

HAMILTON, Ont. The Dominion Rower 
^Transmission Co. announced on Dec. 15 that 

it would spend $100,000 on new sub stations 
in thW city. $220,000 on new works at Decew 
Falls Development plant and $30,000 on new 
■ ars for suburban traffic. 



POUT ARTHUR, Ont.— The municipal 
authorities have now under consideration pro- 
posals for the establishing of new industries 
iUVOlving a capital outlay of $1,400,000. H. S. 
Jones, of Winnipeg proposes to build and 
operate car works. The plant is to cost $400,- 

i. A free site of 15 acres is asked. A 

prominent American manufacturer is asking 
consideration for a project to put up auto- 
mobile works there to cost $500,000. A foun- 
dry project in connection with the local blast 
furnace is also the subject of negotiation. 
Mr. Jones' plant would include in its output 
and operations machinery. cars, railway 
equipment and repairs. 

LONDON, (int.— It has been announced by 
the chairman of the Ontario Hydro-Electric 
Commission that the machine shops of the 
commission will be located in London, that 
being the central point in the transmission 
system. 

ST. THOMAS. Ont. A proposal to establish 
here an industry to employ 200 hands is be- 
ing considered by the City Council. A fixed 
assessment for a number of years is asked 
for. Machinery is to be put in on a consider- 
able scale, but no further particulars are 
given out. 

WELLANl). Out.— At a meeting held here 
this week it was decided by the directors of 
I ho Niagara Falls, Dunnville, and Welland 
Electric Railway Co., to expend $1,000,000 on 
railroad construction account. Car barns and 
machine shops are to be erected in Welland. 
ROCHE POINT, B.C.— The Vancouver Dry 
Hock & Shipbuilding Company will construct 
a large dry dock here at a cost of $1,214,154. 
Work to lie started within six months and 
finished by Dec. 1, 1012. 

WOODSTOCK. N.B.— The machine shop in 
connection with Oonnell's Foundry was des- 
t roved by fire on November 28. Insurance 
amounted' to $21,000 on the entire plant, but 
the loss on the part destroyed exceeds that 
sum. 

ST. BONIFACE, Man.— The council have 
closed an agreement with the Taggart Iron 
Works, of Winnipeg, by which the company 
will erect a large building here, as a branch 
industry. Building operations are to com- 
mence within five months. 

CAMPBELLTON. N.B.— The Trans-Contin- 
ental Railway Co. plans to erect larger build- 
ings here, it is reported, at an estimated cost 
of $200,000. G. Grant, of Ottawa, is chief 
engineer. 

LONDON, Ont.— It is understood that the 
McLaughlin Automobile Co. will erect a large 
building here. 

TORONTO. Out.— The Mexican Northwest 
Equipment Co.. capitalized at $200,000, has re- 
ceived a federal charter. The company pur- 
pose manufacturing locomotives, cars, machin- 
ery and railway equipment of all kinds. 
Headquarters are to be in Toronto. 

WELLAND, Ont.— The Hamilton Tube Co. 
ask for a fixed assessment of $1,500 for 10 
years on a factory and plant they propose 
locating here. 

ST THOMAS, Ont.— F. Doty & Sons, of 
Goderlch. will establish a shipbuilding yard 
at Port Stanley and have leased property for 
that purpose. Building operations are to 
commence at once. The firm will construct 
large tugs and have already received con- 
tracts for three such vessels. 

TORONTO, Ont.— J. Wiss <\- Sons Co., New 
Jersey, have received a permit to manufacture 
shears, scissors, razors, knives, etc., in On- 
tario Ihe capital used not to exceed $40,000. 

GALT Ont. The R. McDougall Co., manu- 
facturers of machine tools and pumps, are 
enlarging their works. 

CARLETON, N.B. The Union Foundry < o. 
propose extending their plant. 

RENFBEW, "nt. Mr. McLean, of Bryson. 
(inc. is considering the establishment of a 
foundry and machine repair shop here. The 
proposed industry would handle lighter and 
more difficult work than is attempted by the 
nary foundry, the repair work being 
made a special feature. 

MONTREAL Que. An annex to the holler 
truction shop is being erected at the 
CPB 'ngus shops here. The new building 
will be 1C0 by 110 ft and Is to be used for 
the construction and repair of locomotive 
tenders, 



ST. CATHARINES, Ont.— The McKinnon 
chain Co. are erecting a new plant here. 

OTTAWA, Ont.— The Diamond Arrow- 
Motor Car Co. and the Modern Machine Co. 
have decided to unite their concerns. The 
manufacturing will be done at the Modern 
Machine Co.'a works which will be much en- 
larged. 

Electrical Notes. 

I'RINCE RUPERT. B.C.— As the result of 
passing an electric light by-law, the sum of 
•Slid, 000 will be raised to pay for a civic light- 
ing plant. 

BROCKVILLE, Ont.— Nine municipalities 
were represented at a meeting held here on 
Dee. 14 to discuss the hydro-electric power 
question. It was decided to open negotiations 
with the commission for 5,300 h.p. to be 
divided among the different municipalities. 
Those represented were Iroquois, Morrisburg, 
Cardinal, Preseott, Lyn, Athens, Brockvllle, 
Kingston and Napanee. 

PORT ARTHUR, Out.— On November 24 the 
first power to come over the hydro-electric 
lines from Kakabeka Falls was delivered to 
this city. Only a temporary supply of 600 
h. p. was given; the entire service commenced 
on December 15. 

BELLEVILLE, Ont.— The Electric Power 
Co. is the name of a corporation that has con- 
trol of several operating power companies in 
the Trent River district, and is proposing 
large extensions into the cities and towns of 
that region. 

WINNIPEG, Man.— The Canadian Carbon 
Co., of Toronto, is establishing a branch fac- 
tory in Winnipeg. The "Black Cap" battery 
will be the main article of production. 

MONTREAL. Que.— A cable from London, 
Eng.. on December 14 announced the forma- 
tion there of the Montreal Tramways & Pow- 
er Co., with a capital stock of $20,000,000. It 
is believed that the concern has been formed 
to take over the Montreal Street Railway. 

STRATFORD. Out.— Among other by-laws 
the ratepayers will be called to vote on one 
providing for the expenditure of $41,610 for 
electric light purposes. 

ROLEAU, Sask.— The contract for the con- 
struction of an electric light plant to cost 
sco.OOO will be let at an early date. 

SHERBROOKE. Que.— The city has de- 
cided to develop power on the Magog river. 
The plans prepared call for the development 
of 2.600 h.p. at an estimated cost of $70,000 
Tenders are to be asked for the purchase of 
the power which the city owns on the St. 
Francis at Westbury. 

TORONTO, Ont— The Western Central 
Railway Co.. incorporated by the Ontario 
Legislature, is applying for a Federal charter 
It is desired to extend the electric lines 
provinelally authorized between Toronto and 
London to Windsor; also to establish a ferry 
connection from Windsor to Detroit. 

Municipal. 

ST. HYACINTHS. P.Q.— The Colonial En 
gineering Co., Montreal, have been awarded 
the complete lighting and pumping equip- 
ment for this city. 

CHATHAM. Ont- The ratepayers will vote 
on a by-law to provide a site of 7 acres nt n 
price not exceeding $1,500 and a fixed low- 
assessment for 10 years for the Western 
Bridge & Enulpment Co. The company is to 
erect a $10^000 plant and spend an equal sum 
for equipment. 

Calgary. Alta.— The construction of an in- 
cinerator is being discussed by the city. Es- 
timated cost. $50,000. 

SOT'RIS. Man— Tenders for delivery during 
soring and summer of 1011 of water pipes, 
hydrants, gate valves, valve boxes, pig lead. 
oakum, standard vitrified sewer pipe. etc.. 
will be received until February 1st. 1011. 

PEMBROKE. Ont A by-law will be sub 
' ; Med to provide by way of Joan the sum «f 
$65,000 fT the extension of the waterworks 
system here. 

GT'ELPn. Ont.— A bv-law to provide for 
the expenditure of $0.R00 for waterworks im- 
provements has been passed by the city 
council, 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



VANCOUVER, B.C.— $200,000 1* the amount 
needed for new waterworks. A by-law 
authorizing the expenditure of this amount 
will be submitted to the ratepayers. 

STAFFORD, Alta.— $15,000 is the amount 
this town proposes to spend on waterworks. 

OAK BAY, B.C.— A by-law to authorize the 
expenditure of $00,000 will be voted on. 

KINCARDINE, Ont.— The ratepayers will 
vote on a by-law to issue debentures for $7,- 
000 for sewers and $2,500 for bridges. 

Saw Mill and Planing Mill News. 

SCOTSTOWN, Que.— The Emberton Lumber 
Co. have recently sold out all of their prop- 
erty at Scotstown, to the East Angus Co. The 
Emberton Co. have had possession of the 
property for nearly two years. 

WINNIPEG, Man.— The Security Lumber 
Co. has been incorporated here with a capital 
of $500,000. John P. Jansen and Lome J. 
Elliott are named as the incorporators. 

FORT GEORGE, B.C.— Timber rights on 
100 sections of land, principally in the Fort 
George district have been purchased by Bri- 
tish capitalists from C. E. Mahon, of Van- 
couver and associates, for $1,500,000. It is 
said that there is over 2,000,000,000 feet of fine 
spruce, cedar and fir on the sections. Most of 
this lumber land is on the Willow river, 20 
miles east of Fort George. 

NELSON, B.C.— The shingle mill and box 
factory which will be erected by the Western 
Box & Shingle Mills. Limited, at Nelson, will 
be a frame building with iron roofing. It 
will be 36 feet by 48 feet and 2 storeys high. 
The estimated cost of the building is $1,000. 
and the machinery $4,000. 

QUATSINO, B.C.— Arrangements have been 
made for the building of a saw mill at 
Quatsino, this winter. Behind this enterprise 
are .Tames Guyer and Gustave Moerman, both 
residents of Quatsino. The mill men will 
start in a small way, catering principally to 
the home market. 

FORT FRANCES, Ont.— The Shevlin-Clarke 
Lumber Co. propose erecting a large mill here 
and ask for a fixed assessment. This com- 
pany is interested in the Rainy River Lum- 
ber Co. and the Shevlin-Mathieu Co. 

BAY OF ISLANDS. Nfd.— The Humber 
Lumber and Pulp Co. is preparing to add to 
its works a very large pulp mill at Bay of 
Islands. 



RIDGEWAY, Ont— E. W. Near Is erecting 
a two-storey addition, 28 by 56 ft., to bis 
planing mill. On the ground floor will be 
offices and engine room. The upper floor 
will be used as a joiner shop. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The Paterson Lumber 
Co. proposes to build manufacturing works to 
cost $250,000 to $300,000 in Vancouver, in con- 
nection with its existing business. 

BRIGDEN," Ont.— The Dominion Cooperage 
plant and stave mill was completely des- 
troyed by fire on November 30. Loss is $14,- 
000, partly covered by insurance. 

VICTORIA, B.C.— A new lumber mill, own- 
ed by the Vancouver Island Mining and De- 
velopment Co., is in operation at Tyee Siding 
on the Esquimau & Nanaimo Railway. The 
mill has a capacity of from 25,000 to 30,000 
ft. per day, 

NANAIMO, B.C.— Walter Marriott has pur- 
chased from Dickie, Van Norman, Haycroft 
and J. W. Vipond, of this city, their interests 
in the Quamichan Saw Mill Co. A joint 
stock company has been organized to take 
over the holdings. 

WELLAND, Ont.— John E. Cutler, whose 
planing mill was recently destroyed by fire. 
is asking for a fixed assessment of $1,000 for 
10 years, under which conditions he will 
erect a new mill. 

ST. BONIFACE, Man.— The lumber mill of 
the Rat Portage Lumber Co. here, was burn- 
ed on December 7. The loss amounted to 
$90,000 of which 75 per cent, was covered by 
insurance. The plant will be re-established 
at once, new machinery having been ordered. 

RAINY RIVER, Ont.— The mill of the Rat 
Portage Lumber Co., which was burned some 
months ago during the forest fires, will be 
rebuilt early next spring. 

MONTREAL, Que.- The sash and door fac- 
tory owned by Pbillipe Saumure was des- 
troyed by fire on November 16. 

HUMBERSTONE, Ont.— S. J. Dickinson's 
planing mill was totally destroyed by fire on 
November 25. The loss is $7,000, of which 
only $500 is covered by insurance. 

ST. JOHN, N.B.— The cooperage plant of 
Taylor and White, here, was recently dam- 
aged by fire to the extent of $5,000. The 
plant was insured for $7,000. 

ST. JOHN, N.B.— J. J. Gordon is complet- 
ing a plant at Coldbrook, three miles from 
this city, for the manufacture of excelsior. 



Geaeral Manufacturing. 

BLENHEIM, Ont— G. A. Fraser, of Thames- 
vllle, is considering the location of a canning 
factory here. 

PETROLEA, Ont.— The 3-storey flour mill 
owned by W. W. Paing, of this town, was 
destroyed by Are on November 17. Total loss, 
$10,000. 

GALT, Ont— The C. Turnbull Co., woollen 
manufacturers, purchased two valuable pieces 
of property on King street, and will, it is 
stated, next year build a large extension. 

HAMILTON, Ont.— In the spring the 
Diamond Flint Glass Co. will erect a large 
glass factory on a 10-acre site obtained for it 
in Hamilton by the Publicity Commisioner. 
When the new factory is completed tbe com- 
pany will vacate its present premises in the 
city. It is also announced by the commis 
sioner that the Egg-O Baking Powder <'<> 
will establish works in Hamilton, and that 
the Robinson Box Mfg. Co.. of Lowell, Mass.. 
will do likewise. It is said that new factories 
of an aggregate value of $4,000,000 have been 
secured for Hamilton within the last twelve 
month. 

MEDICINE HAT. Alta.— The Alberta Clay 
Products plant was formally opened on Nov. 
26. Among the products of this plant are 
sewer pipe, fire rootling and all hollow wares 
of that class, every variety and grade of 
brick. Raw material can be handled to the 
amount of 600 tons per day. 

FORT WILLIAM, Ont.— The Board of 
Trade has been In correspondence with a 
representative of Ely Bros., London, Eng., 
manufacturers of high-grade ammunition, 
who are favorable to locating a Canadian 
plant in this city. 

MONTREAL, Que.— The Dominion Box and 
Package Co., which is capitalized at $700,- 
000, w T ill employ upward of 200 men. It is 
said to be a merger of several smaller com- 
panies, such as the Dominion Wire Bound 
Box Co. and the Montreal Box Co. It is also 
closely allied with Wm. Rutherford and 
Sons. 

BOWMANVILLE, Ont— The Goodyear Tire 
& Rubber Co., of Akron, Ohio, has purchased 
the business and plant of the Durham Rub- 
ber Co., of Bowmanville, Ont., and are now 
manufacturing a complete line of rubber 
products in Canada. From Van Bever, Vice- 



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SIMONDS 



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Hack 

Saw 

Blades 



For both 
Hand and 
Power 
Machine 
Use. 



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Simonds Canada Saw 
Co., Limited 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

St. John, N.B. Vancouver, B.C. 

In the United States, Simonds Mfg. Co- 



THE 

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LIMITED 
INGERSOLL 

ONTARIO 




President of the Canadian company, It is 
learned that his fir in has branches In Tor- 
onto, Winnipeg, .Montreal and Vancouver, and 
are opening additional ones In St. John and 
Calgary. 

Building Notes. 

ST. THOMAS, Out.— The management of 
Alma College have decided to have a new 
wing erected, or a separate building at an 
approximate cost of $30,000. 

SAKNIA, Out.— The Board of Education 
have made a requisition to the council for the 
sum of $45,000 for the erection of a new 
school on the site of the present Loehlel street 
school. 

PORT ARTHUR, Ont.— The city of Port 
Arthur has decided to erect a new collegiate 
institute at a cost of $125,000. 

MONTREAL, Que.— The Canada Rubber 
Co. on December 1!) obtained a permit for the 
erection of a factory to cost $250,000. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The Vancouver Gas 
Co. is preparing to build a new plant on 
deep water frontage. 

WELLAND, Ont. — New industrial buildings 
Hearing completion are the Chipman-Holtou 
Knitting Factory and the Peters Textile 
Factory. The new offices of the Ontario 
Iron & Steel Co. are also about finished. 

New Companies. 
The South Shore Gas Co., Montreal, Que., 

capital stock $100,000: to manufacture, buy 
and sell gas and electricity for lighting, heat- 
ing and motive purposes. Montreal parties 
are named as incorporators. 

National Hydro-Electric Co., Montreal. Que., 
capital stock $1,000,000; to carry on business 
of an electric light, heat and power company. 
Montreal parties are named as incorporators. 

Canadian Electric Automatic Machines. 
Limited. Ottawa. Ont.; capital stock $225,000; 
to secure patent rights for automatic vending 
machines and to manufacture or deal in 
machinery and devices connected therewith. 
Ottawa parties incorporators. 

The Gran by Elastic Web Co., Gran by, Que.; 
capital stock $50,000; to manufacture all 
kinds of rubber goods and webbing. G. H. 
Bolvln, of Granby, is one of the incorporotors. 

The Central Canada Power Co., Toronto, 
Ont.; capital $10,000,000; to carry on hydraulic 
and electrical power business in Canada. 
Members of a Toronto legal office are named 
as incorporators. 

The Dominion Instantaneous Heater Co., 
Vancouver, B.C.; capital stock $100,000; to 
manufacture and purchase the selling rights 
of Gray's Instantaneous Heater. W. Francis, 
E. V. Chevalier, A. C. Brydon-.Tack and E. B. 
Ross, of Vancouver, and A. P. Erancis, of 
Victoria, are the incorporators. 

Certificates of incorporation have been 
granted by the legislature of British Colum- 
bia to the Canadian Dry Battery Co.. Elec- 
trical Advertising Co. and the International 
Lead & Iron Co. 

The Loomis-Morden Cooperage Co., Trenton. 
Out.; capital $30,000; to manufacture cooper- 
age products, woodenware and lumber. In- 
corporators are Chester Loomis, H. B. Loomis 
and W. A. Morden. 

Canadian Explosives. Limited. Montreal : 
capital $15,000,000; to manufacture all kinds 
of explosives, ammunition, firearms, etc. In- 
corporators nominally given as clerks in a 
Montreal law office. The Company has power 
to amalgamate other similar companies. 

The Dryden Timber &• Power Co.. Drydcn. 
Ont.. have been Incorporated with a capital 
of $3,000,000. The incorporators are: F. Sing- 
er, G. Waters and H. Hill, all of Toronto, Ont. 

Trnde Notes. 

MONTREAL, Que.— John Watson & Son. 
architectural Iron works, have been awarded 
the contract for the architectural iron work 
in connection with the large office building 
being erected by the Dominion Express Co. 
in this citv. Contract runs to about $35,000. 

HAMILTON. Ont.— The Smart - Turner 
Machine Co.. 101 Barton St.. East, report the 
following sales for their pumps: Flamand 
Frere. St. Agapit, P.Q.; Canada Preserving 
Co., Hamilton; Merchants Rubber Co., Berlin; 
Great Lakes Dredging Co.. Port Arthur: 
Monarch Knitting Co.. St. Catharines; Tor- 
onto Wire Co.. Oakville: Brown School, Tor- 
onto: The Pure Milk Co.. Hamilton: Toronto 
fc York Rallal Ry., G.T.R., Lake Superior 
Jet.; Goo. F. Webb. Hamilton: Canadian Re- 
fining & Smelting Co., Orillia : Wolverine Mil- 
ling Co.. Druinbo: and ,T. C. Wilson & Co., 
I.achnto Mills. P.Q. 

SHERBROOKE, Que. Bast Canada Power 
& Pulp Co., of Murray Bay, have placed an 
order with the Sherbrooke Machinery Co., ol 
this city, for their complete wet machine 
"tulpment. They have also adopted the Sher 
brook* Mflfuinery, Company's pneumatic 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 




We manufacture all kinds of Pumping 
Machinery, Condensers, Travelling 
Cranes, etc. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 






The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Limited, Hamilton, Canada 



No Lost Motion 



with 

Jeffrey Machinery 

Every detail has been carefully 
worked out to give maximum ca- 
pacity with least frictional resist- 
ance. 

Jeffrey Elevators and Con- 
veyers are adapted to meet 
necessary requirements. 

Write for our Catalog 81. 
State how you are handling your 
materials and simply say you want 
our suggestions. 

The Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

MONTREAL 

Office and Works. Corner Cote and Lagauchetiere Sts. 

Toronto Office. 174 King Street East. 
B ranch Offices in the leading commercial centres of the world. 




Apron Conveyer 




How many mill 
owners have warded off 
the thought of buying a 
Locomotive Crane for handling 
of their logs and dimension timbers, 
thinking the equipment a LUXURY? 
Later you would be surprised at the 
great number of these same mill owners 
who. after seeing their smaller com- 
petitor install a "BROWNING," 
have investigated and found the 
outfit a NECESSITY and a 
rrcney-saver instead. 

^ The Browning Engineering Co. 
^^^L CLEVELAND, OHIO ^^~ ^J 

CMtS 




Engineers and Mill Owners 

"LOOK UP" not the cost of your 

BABBITT METAL 

but the cost of your many shut-downs caused by the use of 
inferior Babbitt Metal. Use THE CANADA METAL CO.'S 
METAL and stop that needless expense. 



Office, 31 William Street, 



Toronto 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers, 



68 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Russell Machine Co. 

MACHINE TOOL 

AND 

DIE MAKERS 

First-class Workmanship 
Price* Right 

Estimate* Furnished to the Trade 

Russell Machine Co. 

St. Catharines, Ont. 



Special Taps 

Special Dies 

Special Reamers 

Unless you have 
special appliances, 
you can get these 
tools from us bet- 
ter and cheaper 
than you can make 
them. 

Wehavethe equip- 
ment and the ex- 
perience. Ask us 
for prices. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



Boilers 

Horizontal Stationary Tubular 

Locomotive Portable 

Vertical 

Marine 

Win. Hamilton Co., Ltd. 

PETERBORO, ONT. 



BENCH 

POWER PRESS 




ign 



Particularly adapted for small, quick 
work, to take place of foot presses. 

Writ* for Price*. 

W. H. Banfield & Sons 

MACHINISTS. DIE AND TOOL MAKERS 

120 Adelaide Street West 
TORONTO - - - CANADA 



"DART" UNIONS 




can be connected or disconnected with 
amazing speed, whether pipes are in 
or out of alignment. They never leak 
Both sections are sealed with non- 
rusting, non-corroding, smooth-ground 
bronze and meet in a ball joint that 
is perfectly tight against steam, air, 
gas, oil and water. 

ASK YOUR DEALER 
FOR DART UNIONS 

DART UNION CO., Limited 



"save-all" system ns well ns their pneumatic 
filtering system. 

TORONTO, Ont.— The Chapman Douhle 
Ball Bearing Co. have reecntly received orders 
for their type of hearings for the addition to 
the Ideal Bedding Co. and for new plant of 
Mendelessohn Piano Co., Toronto; new forge 
shop, Verity Plow Co., Brantford; Amherst 
Boot & Shoe Co. and Canadian Car and Foun- 
dry Co., Amherst, N.S. 

WOODSTOCK, Ont.— The Maximilian Pneu- 
matic Too) Co. are installing machinery, an 
order having been placed with the A. R. Wil- 
liams Co., Toronto, for machine tools amount- 
ing to $30,000. The company will soon be 
manufacturing a full line of riveting and 
Chipping hammers, sand rammers, air motors, 
air compressors, etc. J. R. Porter, Buffalo, 
is president of both the Canadian and U.S. 
Companies. The company is incorporated In 
Ontario for $100,000. 

MONTREAL, Que.— The Canada Ford Co., 
owing to pressure of space have removed 
from their offices in the Canadian Express 
Building, and will hereafter occupy the en- 
tire building at 485 St. James Street (a few 
doors west of Inspector Street) Montreal, 
where they will carry a complete line of the 
products of the Brush Electrical Engineering 
Co., Loughborough, England, as well as 
ventilating fans and blowers, transmission 
material, machine tools and engineers' small 
tools and special machinery, etc. 

TORONTO, Ont.— The Lancashire Dynamo 
,t Motor Co., of Toronto, have been author- 
ized by provincial legislation to engage in 
the manufacture of dynamos, motors and 
appurtenances. Heretofore the company has 
been but a distributing agency of the British 
company. 

MONTREAL— Orders for transformers for ths 
Hydro-Electric power sub-station at Port Credit, 
were secured by Allis-Chalmers-Bullock. 

HAMILTON.— The Canadian Westinghouee Co. 
provided the switching equipment for the Hydro- 
Electric Power and sub-station at Port Credit 

DETROIT.— The Northern Engineering Works 
are Installing four Northern cranes ranging from 
5 to 15 tons capacity in the plant of the Kewa- 
nee Boiler Co., Kewanee, 111. 

TORONTO. — Announcement is made of an Im- 
portant change in the management of the Gold. 
BChmidt Thermit Co., of 90 West Street. New 
York, and who hare a branch here. Commenc- 
ing October 1st, E. Stutz. vice-president and 
general manager, retires from the direction of 
the company, which passes under the manage- 
ment of William C. Cuntz. Mr. Cuntz brings to 
his position a thorough knowledge of the steel 
business and a wide acquaintance with the rail- 
way and street railway officials of the country, 
having been connected for eighteen years with 
the Pennsylvania Steel Co. 

HAMILTON.— The Smart-Turner Machine Co.. 
191 Barton St., East, report the following or- 
ders for their pumps of which they make several 
types : Dploro Mining & Reduction Co., Polero. 
Ont. : Thos. A. Ivey & Sons, Port Dover : 
Gunns, Ltd., Toronto : Beardmore & Co., Acton. 
Ont. : Royal Crown Soap Co.. Vancouver : 
Dresden Canning Co., Dresden. Ont. : S. L. 
Snively, Nelles Corners. Ont. : Peoples' Ry.. 
Berlin : General Hospital. Toronto . and A. Dob- 
son, Beaverton. A traveling crane is bplng sup- 
plied to the C.P.R., Winnipeg, and one to the 
Ouiatchouan Falls Paper Co., Oulatchouan. 
P.Q. The Oliver Chilled Plow Works have placed 
orders for two tumbling barrels with thp Smart- 
Turner Machine Co. 

Western Steel & Iron Co. 

The Western Steel & Iron Co.. Winnipeg. 
has become the successor to the Western Iron 
Works, of that city, with considerably in- 
creased resources. It proposes to manufac- 
ture ornamental and architectural iron work. 
forging*, castings, railroad and contractors' 
materials and specialties on an extended 
basis. The officers of the company are: 
President, C. M. Simpson; vice-president. 
Alex. Simmers; manager and aecretary-treas 
urer, H. R. Eade. 

New Machinery Agency, Montreal. 

Fobs & Fuller is the name of a new machin- 
ery house who have opened at 329 St. James 
Street. Montreal, (omprislng Geo. F. Fobs. 
who was for four years a traveling salesman 
for Williams & Wilson. Montreal, and M. A. 
Fuller, who was connected with the Canadian 
Rand Drill Co., of Sherbrooke. They have 
secured the agency of some prominent Amor- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY* 



b 




BETTER RESULTS AT LOWER COST 

can be secured for any class of castings by arranging: your mixtures by 
analysts. Years of practical experience in foundry work are at your 
service when you consult 'with 

The Toronto Testing Laboratory, Limited 

18 SATURDAY NIGHT BUILDING, TORONTO 

EXPERT FOUNDRYMEN. METALLURGISTS, CHEMISTS 

TESTS OF METALS. FUELS, CORES, OILS Etc., AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



LlATHli 



:-.?* 









>ti^ 










W$gNij»E& 



;.'— 



WON? tfE&fc 



■.JV.A ''-J*- ■,-■■ 



ESTABLISH A MODERN TAX- 
FREE ALCOHOL DISTILLERY 

We have a Good Proposition for Motor Mf rs. 

Having exported our Stills in large amounts for many years, and already having 
several far Eastern agencies we are now open to establish additional agencies and invite 
correspondence to that end, looking after our old customers and prospective buyers by 
special successful demonstrative methods for making Alcohol, Apple Jack, Aguardiente, 
Mescal. Teguila, Peach Brandy, Whiskey, etc. Most modern and simple. All sizes, 5 to 
500 gallons daily capacity distilling apparatus. 

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR information relating to INDUSTRIAL or DENATURED 
ALCOHOL DISTILLING APPARATUS and the amazing possibilities of the utilization 
of waste farm products and wood waste by superheated steam distillation, the distilling 
apparatus as used by us ; the principle involved, also the methods of chemical control 
and disposal of the product and by-products ? We will gladly say to you : 

Denatured Alcohol to-day is of the greatest untold benefit to the American motor 
people. It opens an absolutely new field lor investment lor progressive paper pulp and 
chemical fibre mills, paint, varnish, soap and candle makers, gardeners, farms and 
garbage plants, saw-mills, lumbermen and canneries. The Automobiles and the Navies 
of the world clamor for this new tax-iree cheaper industrial alcohol. May we expect 
some encouragement from the more patrotic pioneers for this new American Industry ? 
The field is new and profitable, and you can practically have the business your own 
way by starting now. We are makers of an apparatus for the production of this de- 
natured or industrial alcohol ; we build and install plants — large or small. The initial 
cost of a plant is small ; the financial risk — if any — is trifling. The equipment is such 
that it can be added to at any time without disturbing the original installation. 
Address 

THE WOOD WASTE DISTILLERIES CO., Inc. 

WHEELING, W. VA., U.S.A. 



lean manufacturers, amongst others: — Schu- 
macher & Boye, Lathes, Cincinnati; Geo. A. 
Gray, Planers, Cincinnati; Mueller Machine 
Tool Co., Radial Drilla, Cincinnati; The J. T. 
Slocoinbe's line of Micrometers and the O.K. 
Tool Holders. 

A. R. Williams Co. In New Brunswick. 
The A. R. Williams Machinery Co. have 
been Incorporated in New Brunswick and will 
open up a branch in St. John, N.B. The In- 
corporators are A. R. Williams, Thomas A. 
Hollinrake, Toronto; M. W. Doherty, St. 
John; F. W. Kischel and Robert Kerr, Brant- 
ford. The capital Is $99,000, of which $50,000 
Is paid up. The St. John manager is M. W 
Doherty. A large building in St. John has 
been purchased. Stocks of machine tools, 
wood-working machinery, boilers, engines, 
saw mill machinery, belting, etc., will be car- 
ried. 

Toronto Agency Northern Cranes. 

A Torouto office of the Northern Engineer- 
ing Co., Detroit, and their Canadian brunch, 
the Advance Machine Works, Walkerville, 
manufacturers of Northern Cranes, has been 
opened up at room 023 Traders Bank Bldg 
The office is in charge of W. P. Robinson, 
who will also represent the Canadian Crocker- 
Wheeler Co., manufacturers of electrical 
machinery; American Electric Fuse Co., Mus- 
kegon Heights, Mich., manufacturers of con- 
trollers, starters, etc., and Hooveu, Owen, 
Reutschler Co., Hamilton, Ohio., manufactur- 
ers of Hamilton Corliss engines. 

Manufactures Dies in Montreal. 

An item appeared in the November issue 
of Canadian Machinery with reference to the 
demand on the part of many small manu- 
facturers lor dies for punching brass, metal 
etc. Ernest Scott, 145 Bleury [street, Montreal, 
writes us that he is a manufacturer of ail 
kinds of dies of this nature and in a position 
to submit prices on all work of this kind. 
Montreal Branch, Thos. Firth & Sons. 

Thos. Firth & Sous, of Sheffield, England, 
have opeueu up a branch office and ware- 
house at 507 St, Paul Street, Montreal, where 
they intend carrying stock of their tool 
steels, etc. The business is under the man- 
agement of J. A. Sherwood, formerly of 
i-ittsburg, who has had a long and sucessful 
experience with the company. 

Massey-Harris Co. Enlarging;. 

The Massey-Harris Co. have bought out the 
works of the Johnston Harvester Co., Batavia, 
N.x". The Massey-Harris Co. are enlarging 
their Toronto and Brautford plants, having 
secured additional property adjacent to these 
plants. The buying ot a plant in the United 
States is to assist in taking care of their 
foreign trade. 

Pumps for N.T.B. Shops. 

The John McDougall Caledonia Iron Works 
Co., Montreal, are furnishing a u umber of 
pumps for the N.T.K. shops at Transcona, 
near Winnipeg. These consist of two 8-in. 
single stuge Horizontal turbine pumps, with 
extended bases. Each of these pumps is 
direct connected on the same base with an 
18 in. six-stage 70 li.p. horizontal Kerr steam 
lurbiue, running at 1,500 r.p.ni. The capacity 
ot each of tnese machines is 1,200 U.S. gaiious 
per uiiuute when operating against total head 
of 160 feet. The pumps were manufactured 
in Montreal, and tlie turbines were made by 
the Kerr Turbine Co., Weiisville, N.i. 

Two 14x10^x10 Blake horizontal duplex 
piston pattern boiler leed pumps, mouuteu ou 
cast iron bedplates. Each of these pumps 
will have capacity of 200 U.S. gallons per 
minute and used for supplying boilers oper- 
ating under 150 lbs. steam pressure. 

Two 6x4%x3x3t> Blake vertical Artesian 
Well Pumps. Each of these machines are 
used to araw water from 6 in. diameter 
Artesian wells and deliver to a high level 
tank at an elevation of 120 ft. above ground 
level, and will have capacity of 40 U.S. gal- 
lons per minute when operating under the 
above conditions. These iatter pumps are 
manufactured by the George F. Blake Mfg. 
Co., East Cambridge, Mass. 

One 20-in. Vertical Centrifugal Pump, direct 
connected to one 350 h.p., 450 r.p.m., 3 phase, 
b0 cycle, 550 volt, type "F" Motor, complete 
with cast iron base and thrust bearing to 
take care of the weight of the rotor only. 
This pump is designed to have capacity of 
10,000 Imperial gallons per minute against 
total head of 48 feet, and will have an effi- 
ciency of 70 per cent, when operating under 
the above conditions and running at a speed 
of 436 r.p.m. The motor will be controlled by 
Cutler-Hammer 350 h.p. automatic motor 
starter, complete with ball, float, chain and 
switch. It will also be supplied with hand- 
operating controller and resistance. Tber* 
will also bt supplied in connection witk this 



70 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




The British Aluminium Co., Limited 

LONDON, - ENGLAND 

Beg to announce THE OPENING on 
October fifteenth, 1910, of their new 

Canadian Headquarters, at 24 Adelaide St. W., Toronto 

in charge of 

MESSRS. PARKE & LEITH, General Agents for Canada 

A Large Stock of Aluminium in all the Commercial Forms will 
be kept — Wholesa'e and Retail. 



JESSOP'S '■ 



Best Tool Steel 

'ARK" High-Speed Steel 



THE FAVORITE BRANDS WITH USERS OF GOOD STEEL. 
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF SIZES IN STOCK. 
JESSOP'S HIGH-GRADE FILES AND RASPS. 



80 Bay St., Toronto, Ontario 

Chas. L. Bailey, Agent. 

Reid-Newtoundland Company 

St John's, Newfoundland. 



Jas. Robertson Co., Ltd 

Montreal, Quebec 
Jas. Robertson Co., Ltd., 
St. John, New Brunswick 



WM. JESSOP & SONS, Limited, Manufactory, SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 




Crucibles are part of the expense of your 
foundry. It will pay you to be sure you're 
using the best. 

Dixon's Crucibles 

have a record of 83 years behind them. You 
will find them adapted to your melting. 

Free booklet, 223-A, sent on request 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY 



JERSEY CITY, 



N.J., U.S.A. 



outfit a motor panel to mount the following 
instruments : — 

One 400 amp. 3 pole single throw automatic 
oil switch. 

I >ne 500 amp. Weston Ammeter. 

One coo volt Weston Voltmeter. 

This panel will he made of Blue Vermont 
Marble, complete with frame work and con- 
nections. 

One 8-lneh Centrifugal Sewage rump, direct 
connected to 30 h.p. tor with Cutler-Ham- 
mer starling controller and resistance, com- 
plete with float switch and lloat ball and 
chain. This outfit will have capacity of 2,000 
Imperial gals, per minute when operating 
against total head of 15 ft. The pump will 
have an efficiency of 50 per cent, when oper- 
ating at a speed of 430 r.p.m. This outfit will 
also have a motor panel with the following 
instruments mounted on same: — 

One 50 amp. type "B" automatic oil switch. 

One 00 amp. Weston Ammeter. 

One GOO volt Weston Voltmeter. 

All complete with frame work, etc. 

The pumps will be manufactured in the 
John McDougall Caledonia lion Works at 
Montreal and the Allis-Chalmers-Bulloek, 
Montreal, are supplying the electrical appar- 
atus. 

All the centrifugal pumps will he designed 
under the supervision of Consulting Engineer, 
William Clinton Brown, formerly chief en- 
gineer of Henry R. Worthington, New York. 

$7,000,000 of Equipment Ordered by C.P.R. 

Over $7,000,000 worth of new cars and train 
equipment has been ordered by the C.P.R., all 
to be delivered by next summer. Two thous- 
and refrigerator, coal, bos, and other class of 
freight cars, and 200 coaches for passenger 
train equipment, including baggage, express, 
sleeping, dining, parlor and. observation cars 
are at present under construction at the com- 
pany's Angus shops, and, besides these, orders 
have been placed with other firms for 2,000 
steel frame box cars of 80,000 lbs. capucity, 
to cost over two million dollars. Five hundred 
stock cars and 800 flat cars have also been 
ordered from outside. Orders for seventy- 
five heavy locomotives have also been placed 
in Canada, at the Angus shops, Kingston, and 
Montreal Locomotive Works. 

The policy of the Canadian Pacific Railway 
indicates that they are planning to cope with 
any business that may be offered, with ample 
equipment built by Canadian workmen. They 
have never lacked confidence in the rapidly 
growing trade of Canada and the great 
transportation possibilities of the country's 
future. 



CATALOGUES. 

Steel and Wood Pulleys — The Oneida Steel 
Pulley Co., Oneida, New York, have issued a 
48-page, 6x9 ins., illustrated catalogue of 
steel and wood pulleys and other specialties. 

Calendar.— J. R. Baxter, 102 St. Autoine St., 
Montreal, have published an attractive calen- 
dar for 1911, which they are sending to their 
customers and friends. 

Graphite Products for Railroads. — A new 
booklet has just been issued by the Joseph 
Dixon Crucible Company, of Jersey City, N.J., 
under the above title. This, as its name im- 
plies, covers the Dixon line of products that 
the widely used in railroad service. 

The object of the book is to bring under 
one cover all the various products in the 
Dixon line that are of interest to the various 
mechanical departments of railroads. These 
include various' graphite lubricants, protective 
paint, crucibles, facings, etc., all of which 
have been found by actual service to give 
satisfactory results. 

The booklet runs to 40 pages, and is quite 
attractively illustrated by means of photo- 
graphs showing different views of railroad 
still inns anil yards, different types of locomo- 
tives, stretches of track, signals, bridges, 
etc. If you are interested in the use of any 
graphite products about the railroad, you 
should write for copy of this booklet, which 
will be sent free to those desiring it. 

Electrical Machinery.— Paper, 10x8y 2 ins. 
Crocker-Wheeler Co., Ampere, N.J. 

These bulletins are prepared for filing: 
Bulletin No. 120, 16 pp. — Form I motors, belt 
D. C. 3% to 50 h.p.; generators, 3 to 45 K.W. 
Bulletin No. 122, 8 pp.— Form D machines, 
belt type D. C. motors, 25 to 300 h.p., gener- 
ators, 45 to 250 K. W. Bulletin No. 123, 16 
pp. — Adjustable speed motors, % to 32 h.p.; 
speed ranges, 2:1-2.5:1-3:1; eleven frame sizes. 
Bulletin 125, 8 pp.— Reinck type transformers 
for light and power. 

Fine Tools.— The L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, 
Mass. Catalogue No. 19. Size 5%x7V 2 in.; 
pages, 274. Describes and illustrates a very 
complete line of fine mechanical tools, which 
Includes a number 'hat have been added since 
the previous edition was published. Brief 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



7i 



ARMSTRONG BROS. 

16 Sheppard St., Toronto 

Mfrs. of SPECIAL MACHINERY 

Patents Perfected 

GEAR CUTTING, TOOLS, DIES, ETC. 

Ruching and Pleating Machinery. 



ERNEST SCOTT 

91 BLEURY ST, - MONTREAL 
Machinist and Tool-maker 

Dies for sheet metal work. Stampings and 

light manufacturing. Special machinery 

designed and made to order. 



The PARMENTUS BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 
GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, 
Bifurcated and Tubular Rivets, Wire Nails 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, 
fcscutcheon Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshoe 
Buckles, Felloe Plates. 



OWEN SOUND IRON WORKS, LIMITED 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Cement Mill Machinery, Boiler and Steel 

Tank Work of all kinds, Grey 

Iron and Brass Castings 



Oil Tempered 

Steel 

Springs 

— for every purpose 
and the best for each 



—Special styles of 
all kinds to order. 



THE CLEVELAND 

WIRE SPRING CO. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 




specifications are given, and a number ol 
tables of useful information completes the 

catalogue. The customary system oi marginal 
numbers has been retained and both numer- 
ical and alphabetical indices lender it a sim- 
ple matter to locate any tool quickly. 

Screw .Machines. — The National-Acme Mfg. 
Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Calendar. Size 12xl."> in. 
Bach of the 12 leaves in addition to giving 
the calendar for one month contains an illus- 
tration either- of a screw machine or some of 
its products. Among these are the multiple 
spindle screw machine and some products of 
the screw machine milling attachment. 

Handling Coal. — Bulletin No. 42 from 
the press of the Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Col- 
umbus, O., is entitled "Coal Handling 
and Mine Equipment, " and is a 48-page 
catalogue descriptive of this line of 
machinery. This book, which is larger 
than the usual Jeffrey publication, de- 
scribes the Jeffrey Coal Tipple, illus- 
trating a number of recent installa- 
tions. In addition, numerous illustra- 
tions from their minor pamphlets, de- 
scribing other coal handling machinery, 
giving the pamphlet number where 
more detailed information is to be had. 
It serves as a review book of their coal 
handling machinery. 

Celfor Tools. — Catalogue No. 10, ol 
the Celfor Tool Co., Kail way Exchange, 
Chicago, 111., a handsome 3U-page 
booklet, describing their line of drills, 
chucks, shanks, reamers, 3-lipped drills, 
sockets for reamers and 3-lipped drills, 
and Kich Hat drills and chucks. Besides 
describing and listing their respective 
prices, in a comprehensive manner much 
useful information concerning drill and 
reamer speeds, etc., and additional 
tables are given. The Celfor drills and 
reamers are made from flat high speed 
steel bars, twisted to shape, and in cat- 
alogue they are illustrated in opera- 
tion. 

Standard Automobile Gauges. — This 
line as manufactured by the Industrial 
Instrument Co., Foxboro, Mass., is 
described in their bulletin No. 36, a 
4-page folder. As well as briefly de- 
scribing the gauge and its features', its 
varied uses on an automobile are given, 
showing that it would be to the advan- 
tage of automobile owners to have 
them. 

Multiple Drilling Machines. — Section 
B of the 1910 series of catalogues, en- 
titled Modern Machine Tools, issued 
from Webster & Bennett, Ltd., Coven- 
try, England, is a 32-page booklet, de- 
scriptive of this line of tools, and gives 
a large variety of the different multiple 
drilling machines that they manufac- 
ture, enumerating the salient features 
of each as well as their size, weights, 
etc. Among the machines are various 
types of drilling machines, combined 
drilling and boring machines, combined 
drilling, boring and tapping machines 
and sensitive drilling machines. 

Motors. — Continuous current protect- 
ed and ventilated motors are dealt with 
in the 4-page leaflet No. 9, from S. W. 
Broadbent, Ltd., Huddersfield, England. 
The principal parts of the machine are 
briefly described, and the original fea- 
tures dwelt upon. In addition, is a 
general description of the machine, and 
a list, which includes prices, and data 
concerning a number of different sized 
machines. 

Series Arc Lighting System.— With 
Cooper Hewitt Rectifier. This is the 
subject of Circular No. 1155, of the 
Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ltd., 
Hamilton, which is a 32-page booklet 
descriptive of this system of lighting. 
The system in detail is fully explained, 



ONE MAN 

can cut threads on 6-in. pipe with a 



ft 



BEAVER" 

ADJUSTABLE DIE STOCK 




No. 6, threading 1-4.3-8, 1-2, 3-4 in. complete. 
No changing of Dies or Bushings. 




No. 25B, 1 in. to 2 in.. R.H. complete. 




No. 60, cuts 2'A, 3, 3 l A, 4, \M 5, and 6 inch pipe. 

NOTE— That with the three tools 
shown above you can thread from 
1-4 in. to 6 in. pipe. No loose parts. 




No. 41, cuts 2!' 2 , 3. V/? and 4 in. pipe. 




"WARREN" DIE STOCK 

(Non-receding dies adjustable.) 

Each stock cuts two sizes. Made in four sizes 

Prices $5.00, $5.50, $6.00 and $7.00. 



THEY SAVE TIME AND MONEY 
Write for our Illustrated List 

Borden-Canadian Go. 

Richmond St. East, Toronto, Ont. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The 

IMPERIAL CHUCK 

has been tried and not 
found wanting. 




When you buy our chuck 
you not only save the duty 
but help build up your own 
country by keeping your 
money in Canada. 

Write for catalogue and dis- 
count, and let us convince 
you that we are stating the 
truth. 

Ker & Goodwin 

Brantford, Canada 




"CUSHMAN" CHUCKS 



Fcr general machinists' use. 
Strong and durable and 
designed for hard service. 

Oar catalogue shows many 
styles an J siirs and is sent 
free. :::.:: 

The Gushman Chuck Go, 

Hartford, Conn., U.S.A. 

Established 1862 




with all the auxiliary apparatus, mak- 
ing in all a very instructive booklet on 
lighting. 

Radial Drills— The 2$, 3 and 3* foot 
arm, simple type radial drill, manufac- 
tured by the Mueller Machine Tool Co., 
Cincinnati, 0., are described on leaflets 
just issued by that company. They are 
machines which they are making in 
conjunction with their standard radial 
drills. Special reference is given to the 
general dimensions, and also the salient 
features pertaining to the column, arm, 
head, tapping mechanism, feed, spindle, 
depth gauge and automatic trip, base, 
plain square box table, and motor. 
Excellent cuts of the drills with ar- 
rowed description are given in the 
pamphlets. 

Hack Saw Blades. — Catalogue No. 
16 of the Diamond Saw and Stamping 
Works, Buffalo, N.Y., is a 16-page book- 
let, attractively gotten up. In it are 
described and listed the various lines of 
"Sterling" hack saw blades, frames, 
power machines, etc. The advantages 
of the different lines are set forth, and 
the kinds best suited to the various 
lines of work are given. An accompany- 
ing 4-page leaflet describes their 3 sizes 
of high speed power hack saw machines, 
and includes the results of a production 
test. 

Small Tools and Machinery.— The cat- 
alogue of the Hamilton Tool Co., Ltd., 
Hamilton, Ont., describes their line of 
small tools and machinery. Among 
the articles enumerated are Beaver drills 
and collets, ball bearings, milling cut- 
ters, reamers, slotting saws, sensitive 
drill, and bench drill. In addition are 
a list of letters of commendation from 
satisfied patrons. The articles shown 
are listed in a very convenient manner 
for ready reference. Much useful matter 
is contained, as the Beaver collet, es- 
pecially, is described in considerable 
detail. 

Blowers. — The American Blower Co., 
Detroit, have issued bulletin No. 286, 
entitled "Blower Equipment for the 
Modern Foundry." An excellent article 
on heating and ventilating the foundry, 
is given, dealing with that subject at 
some length, showine - how their blowers 
can be used to advantage. In addition 
are articles or blowing equipment, ex- 
haust systems, ABC forge blower, ven- 
tilating apparatus, mechanical draft 
apparatus for steam boilers, and ABC 
vertical enclosed self-oiling steam en- 
gines. An additional article at the 
back of the l«ook gives some interest- 
ing figures on comparisons of isolated 
lighting plant cost with central sta- 
tion service. 

Money and Labor Savers. — Is the title 
of a large 12 double page catalogue of 
neal design, issued by Walter MacLeod 
& Co., East Pearl St., Cincinnati, 0. 
As the cover states, it is for the busy 
man who has not time to wade through 
a large catalogue, and for that reason 
is made very concise, containing no 
reading- matter whatever, only titled 
illustrations, of which there are several 
dozen, of a good size. Fuller catalogues 
of the various machines are also to be 
had. Among the articles illustrated 
are the Buckeye lead and babbitt melt in •■ 
furnace-, heater for foundry, heaters of 
general types, ear-bide lights, kerosene 
light-, locomotive and car tire heaters, 
weed burners, oil furnaces and forges. 
water softening plants, paint and white- 
wash sprayers, and sand blast- For 
rtady refemica, it ii aitremaly handy. 



JOHN J. GARTSHORE 

83 Front St. W., Toronto 

RAM Q and supplies 

l»rAIL.O New and Second-hand 
For RAILWAYS, TRAMWAY8. Etc. 
Old Material Bought and Sold. 



PATTERNS AND MODELS. 




^ALL KINDS — 

Difficult Core Work a Specially 
High Grade • Right Prices • Prompt - Delivery 

SAT/S^ACTORY WORK GUARANTEED 

THE HAMILTON PATTERN WORKS 

258 Catherine: street north 
HAMILTON . ONT 



TTER 



SB 



FOR 

r ALL KINDS OF MACHIN 

WORK. MADE IN 

WOOD. BRA55 
WHITE METAL OR 1RO 

by the very highest class of skilled 
mechanics 

Only the highest grade of material 
uoed in our work. We can handle 
your pattern work to your complete 
satisfaction. 
Let us quote prices. 



TORONTO PATTERN WORKS 
S7 J&rvis 5t,Toronto.,Can&clc\ 









etoeei 






.18 MAWvft #AMlLT;ON;QNT • 



jii^iVjV'atvVriiVtir 



< 



• 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



73 



WANTE O 

The; Services of a Representative 

in Canada 

to look after our old customers and pros- 
pective buyers of our Modern, Simple, Tax- 
free Industrial Alcohol Distilling Apparatus, 
by special successful demonstrative methods 
for making Alcohol. Apple Jack, Aguardiente. 
Mescal. Teguila, Peach Brandy. 'Whiskey. 
Solidified Alcohol in Cubes. Etc.. also De- 
natured Alcohol. Most modern, simple. 5 
Gal. Still and all sizes to 500 Gal. Daily Cap- 
acities. Good Salary and Commission. Ad- 
dress with three references. 

THE WOOD WASTE DISTILLERIES CO., Inc. 
Wheeling W. Va., U.S.A. 



Do Your 
Tumbling 

In a Globe improved 
Tilting Tumbler and 
get finest results 
quickest and cheap-, 
est. It is made in six 
sizes for all porposes 
for wet or, Jlry work. 




"GLOBE" 

Dies Stampings. 

Special Manufacturing 
Contract Work. 



If you want to get 
an interesting little 
magazine free, abk 
for "THE SIL- 
ENT PARTNER." 



THE GLOBE MACHINE & STAMPING CO. 

898 Hamilton Street, Cleveland, 0. 

Canadian Agent : 
H. W. PETRIE, Front St. W., Toronto, Canada 




The June, Improved Stamping 

PRESS GUARD 

This Guard is very simple, yet 
absolutely positive In Its action, 
as the operator cannot trip the 
press while his fingers are iu 
the danger zone. Also the press 
cannot repeat unless the Guard 
is down in front of dies, and 
then the operator cannot have 
his fingers in at the same time. 
The gate should be set so that 
it is down on base or die or 
bed of press when the latch of 
press releases. Then when the 
operator releases the treadle the 
gate will rise from 3 to 7 inches. 
according to requirements, leav- 
ing the front open to take out 
and put iu work. 

This Guard can be set so fine 
that anything 1-16 inch thick 
under the Guard gate will pre- 
vent the press from operating. 
Thus you can see it is utterly 
impossible for an operator to 
have his fingers between the 
dies and trip the machine at the 
same time. 

Is not in the operator's way 
and does not interfere with the 
output of press ; works on all 
kinds of presses, back-geared, 
large or small. 

Note the rigid connection be- 
tween Treadle, Guard and 
Latch. 

These Guards are already in- 
stalled in a number of large 
manufacturing plants and are 
giving every satisfaction. 

We also manufacture guards 
for woodworking machines. 
Write us for circular matter. 

The Jones Safety Device Company 

22 King William St , HAMILTON, ONT. 
Chicago, 111. Buffalo, N.Y. Brooklyn, N.Y. 



H 



m 



Nothing Ever Like 16 




Our NEW FACE PLATE JAWS show a 
distinctly improved mechanical design— a 
quality for which this company is becoming 
known. 




1 



Note that the ends of the jaws are beveled 
to an angle of 45 degrees so that they will 
/fit closely together when brought to the 
centre. When holding small work they can 
be run clear to the centre (as shown in cut) 
and held by clamp bolts entering the side 
pockets. Made in sizes from 4-in. to 14-in. 

Write for Circular 

S. E. H0RT0N MACHINE CO. 

WINDSOR LOCKS, CONN., U.S.A. 

(Not the E. Horton & Son Co.) 



H 




CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Power Talk No. 2— 

Savings Actually 
Demonstrated 

Read the following extracts from letters of 
leading Canadian firms : — 

"Undoubted!; great power savers." — Cudahy Packing Co., 
Toronto. 

"They are making us a saving >>f over "4 per ceut." — Re- 
llance Knitting Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

"Saving of power litis surprised us. Before your bearings 

were installed, our engine was up to her capacity, and we 

were nnable to get sufficient power to light our plant. Since 
installing, have sufficient power for factory purposes and 
lighting, and have sufficient dry steam for heating a small 
addition to the factory. Our saving is about 20 h.p." — Adams 
Bros. Harness \ Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

"After installing your Ball Bearings, we experienced not 
• oily a great saving of power, but all the previous trouble 
we had relative of lubricating and keeping our shafting in 
condition was eliminated. They have paid for themselves in 
the saving of power and also in saving of attention and care. 
The bearings have been on our shafts for a year and a half." — 
The William Davies Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

"Have been using your double ball bearings for the past 
two years: find them a great power saver. By actual test 
we timl they have saved us 25 per cent." — Puritan Knitting 
Mills, Ltd., Toronto. 

"Over four years ago we equipped our shafting throughout 
with your bearings. Since that time we have installed more. 
The saving is what you claim, generally from 20 per cent, to 
26 per cent." — The Cowan Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Booklet, containing copies of letters from which the above extracts are taken, sent on request. 

The Chapman Double Ball Bearing Co. of Canada, Limited 

339-351 SORAUREN AVENUE, TORONTO, CANADA 



"Shafting installed some eighteen months ago has given 
far mote satisfaction than even our most sanguine expecta- 
tions. We have made a saving of from 20 per cent, to 25 per 
cent. Will further equip with your bearings." — The Canadian 
Locomotive Co., Ltd., Kingston. 

"Running large portions of our machinery with these bear- 
ings for four years. Have effected a great saving in power." — 
The Flavelle Milling Co., Ltd., Lindsay. 

"Have over 300 of your Ball Bearing Boxes in use in our 
factory. Have given us entire satisfaction in every respect. 
We ran friction tests in comparison with the ordinary babbitt 
boxes, and found the Ball Bearing Boxes greatly reduced the 
friction load." — T. H. Schwitzer, Factory Engineer, the North- 
ern Electric & Mfg. Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

"Five years ago we installed Chapman Double Ball Bear- 
ings throughout plant No. 2. Since that time we have been 
adding short lines of shafting and bearings, and we finally 
decided to replace all old friction shafting with ball bearings. 
This has been accomplished with a resulting saving of about 
50 per cent, in power." — Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph. 



NOW THE THIRD CITY IN CANADA 



WINNIPEG 

MANITOBA 

The Supply City of Western Canada 

Offers greater combined advantages to manufacturers and capi- 
talists than any city in Canada. The remarkable development 
• ■f this great central market is creating an unprecedented de- 
mand for borne industries. 

Winnipeg Wants These Manufacturers 

and offers cheap power, cheap sites, low taxation, varied raw 
materials, the best of labor conditions, unexcelled railway fa- 
's, ami the earnest support of a coi unity that recog- 

the Importance (if its industries. (Her a billion dollars 
produced by the farms of Western Canada in the past five 
yeai b ^ with only eight per cent, of the available land 

under cultivation. Consider what this development makes 
llble for the home manufacturer. 

£•"- YOUR OPPORTUNITY -*1 

GET CLOSE TO THIS MARKET 

Special openings for manufacturing farm and agricultural 
Implements, Including gas and steam tractors; paper and 
straw-board mills, men's clothing, ladies' ready-to wear goods. 

foodstuffs, stanh factory, boots and shoes, felt wear, metal 

dl, wire nail factory, hardware Specialties, flax and jute 
works, beel sugar factory, elevator machinery, electrical fix- 
tures and appliances of all kinds, automobiles and commer- 
cial motor carriages, home and office furniture, leather goods, 
cereal foods, dairy supplies, building materials, stoves, ranges. 
fnrnai et and healing plants, and twenty-live other smaller lines. 
Special reports prepared and mailed free of charge on the 
manufacturing possibilities of any of these lines of industries. 
by addn < ii \~ i koLa.nd, Cunjmlisl»n«r of Indus- 

tries, Winnipeg, 'anada. 




4 



Often Imitated ! Never Equalled ! 

Taliman s Reputation is in the Goods. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Finished Brass Goods 
Brass Castings 
Aluminum Castings 



SfwMIMffi 




The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 





Bliss Automatic Combination Feed Presses 



Performing five (5) operations every revolution, these presses produce with great rapidity 
and economy such articles as buttons, bottle stoppers, ferrules, lamp sockets and burners, var- 
nish can nozzles, oil can bodies, harness oil can tops, stove trimmings, lamp and lantern parts, 
door knobs and similar articles requiring a series of operations. They save labor and shop 
room, eliminate intermediate handling, and avoid all danger to the operator's hands. 
Write for details, stating requirements. 
Presses, Dies, Drop Hammers, Shears and Special Machinery. 

E. W. BLISS CO., 20 Adams St., BROOKLYN, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Representatives for Chicago and vicinity: STILES-MORSE CO., 
No. 562 Washington Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 



London Office— 114 Queen Victoria Street, London, EC, England. 




Factory Equipment 

We shall be pleased|to"quote you on our 

Lockers and Indestruc- 
tible Factory Stools. 



Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co. 

HAMILTON 




Buy an ALLEN ffiK RIVETER 
and be sure of the fastest and 
tightest riveting at the lowest cost 

Send for our unequalled " Records." They will interest you. 
Special riveters designed to meet all requirements. 

"WHATEVER THE RIVETING, THERE'S AN ALLEN FOR THE JOB." 

JOHN F. ALLEN COMPANY 

Est. 1872 

370-372 Gerard Avenue, NEW YORK 

AGENTS— Canadian Rand Drill Co.. Toronto, Halifax, Montreal. Liebera and W.U. Code*. "Rireter." 





Protecte ' b<- Patent 



HEAP'S 



High Speed BOLT and 
PIPE THREADING 
Machines are made in 
all sizes with Single and Multiple Heads. 



New Patent Die Head, on which the dies are operated 
mechanically, NOT BY SPRING; Automatic Opening and 
Closing Device, Die Adjustment whilst in motion, and many 
other important features are embodied. 

Send for Catalogue 

JOSHUA HEAP & GO., Ltd., Ashton-on-eTyn, England 

Canadian Agents : PEACOCK BROS., Montreal 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



?£> 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




iHniiHiimiiniiiiniitiiiiiiiiiii 




:■■".<£ 

il ■ I r r r ti 1 1 r I r ill 1 91 



Special Steel 
Special Methods 

and long years of experience 



Are the reasons why the files pro- 
duced by the Nicholson File Co. are 
well known everywhere as the 
standard of file quality. These are 
the well-known factory brands made 
by the Nicholson File Company in 
Canada : 

AMERICAN 

ARCADE 

GREAT WESTERN 

GLOBE 

EAGLE 

McCLELLAN 

K&F 

J. B. SMITH 

Get these and you get the best. 

Nicholson File Co. 



(Dominion Works) 



Port Hope 



Ontario 





--■: 

U.S. A 





The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



77 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 



High Speed Steel 
High Speed Tools 

CONQUEROR IMPROVED 

HIGH- 
SPEED 

made by twisting the rolled bar. 
NO EXPENSIVE MILLING. NO 
WASTE of COSTLY MATERIAL 
The natural fibre of the Steel 
remains undisturbed. 
RESULT— 

BETTER DRILLS, 
LESS BREAK- 
AGES, LOWER 
PRICES 



v." 




A feature of 

these Drills is 

that no special 

holder is required. 

Shanks made to fit 

ordinary Morse Sockets 



MAKERS 

J. Beardshaw & Son, Ltd. 

Sheffield, Eng. 
General Sales Agent : 

ALEXANDER GIBB, Montreal 

Sales Agents for Ontario : 

Aikenhead Hardware, Ltd., Toronto 

Sales Acenls for Nfw Brunswick: 

, McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B 



All Good Mechanics 

throughout the length and breadth of the 
land have nothing but praise for 

Butterfield's 

Taps, Dies 

and Reamers 

Their excellence is due largely to the 
special hardening and tempering process 
employed — the result of thirty years' 
experience— and nothing but the highest 
quality materials and best skilled labor 
are used in their manufacture. 

Write us to-day for details and prices 

Butterf ield &» Co. 



Rock Island, 
Quebec 



Derby Line, 
Vermont 






If 




A Double Economy 

Carborundum Grinding Wheels 
are not only the fastest cutting 
but also the longest lasting grind 
ing wheels on earth. 



For instance: 



An Indianapolis concern is using 
Carborundum Wheels in grinding 
cast iron piston rings. Each wheel 
turns out 450 to 500 rings an 
hour, removing .010 inches stock. 
And yet, notwithstanding the 
speed at which the wheels cut, 
the michrometer shows that 50 
rings are ground before there is 
any perceptible wheel loss. Result 
^A Double Economy. 

We will be glad to show you what Carborun- 
dum is doing in other lines of grinding — if 
you will write. 

The 

Carborundum Company 

Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

AGENTS: 

Norman Macdonald. 145 Wellington St. West. Toronto. Can. 

McLennan. McFeely & Co.. Vancouver. B.C. 

Williams & Wilson. Montreal. Que. 

A. R. Willams Machinery Co . of Winnipeg. Ltd.. Winnipeg. Man. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




I , w; w . v^^^-^^A-^^ ^mWm|yM^ l ^^:^m^^M^^^ 



Your Chance to Obtain Patterns 
at Bargain Prioes 

LAURIE "RIVAL" LINE— Six sizes, 15 to 55 h.p., 
horizontal. 

" AUTO-CLIMAX " LINE— Two sizes, 5 to 10 h.p., 
vertical. 

Special tnap price on these six sizes horizontal 
and two sizes vertical 

of $550.00, less 5 per cent, for cash. 

Write at once. 

J. T. Schell 

ALEXANDRIA - - ONTARIO 



THE JOHNSON FRICTION CLUTCH 



The Johnson Friction Clutch is so nicey balanc- 
ed that it runs any speed, high or low, without 
the least bit of vibration, bang, or clatter. The 
working parts are all completely covered so that 
no dirt can get at them. 

By using Johnson Clutches you can use the Line 
Shaft direct for driving and thereby save not 
only in power, but in countershafts, pulleys 
space and so on. 

You will be interested in our " Book of Clutches 
that Clutch." Send for Catalog No. 5. 




Clutch with 

Pulley on 

Hub 



Canadian Agents :— CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO. 



Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 

Calgary and St. John 



Vancouver 



THE CARLYLE JOHNSON MACHINE CO. Manchester conn 



Rockwell 

Melting 

Furnaces 

Stationary, Tilting, Rever- 
beratory. Built in standard 
sizes. Simple, strong, 
durable. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG No. 26 

WS ROCKWFT T CO Hudson Terminal Bldg 
. O. I\.WV_,rv VV EjL^Ls V^W. 50 Church St.. NEW YORI 




YORK 



'The Original Furnace Rockwell) 



LAFF ITTE 



WELDING PLATES 



Weld at a low 

heat 
8avo In time, 
fuel and labor 



Send for 

samples and 

circulars 




No special 

equipment Is 

necessary 



No waste with 
the plate 

aswithpowders 



THE PHILLIPS, LAFFITTE CO., Phlla Pa., U.S.A. 



#ek your 
dealer 



Do Not Be Misled by Inferior Imitations. 




There is but one 

PRENTISS 

VISE 



Made by 



Prentiss Vise Company 

Hardware Building, 106-110 Lafayette St., Cor. Walker St., NEW YORK 

Canadian Agents: A. McFarland & Co.. Coristine Bide., Montreal 




The Whiton 

AUTOMATIC 

Gear Cutting 
Machine 



Do you want Catalog ? 

The D. E. Whilon 
Machine Co, 

NEW LONDON, - CONN. 



The advertiser would like to know where yon saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



79 



YOU NEED MORE LIGHT 

IN YOUR FACTORY WRITE 

TORONTO St MAIS/Ill-TOIM 
ELECTRIC CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Dynamos 

for Light and Power 
AND ALL 

Electrical Apparatus 




. 



NORTON JACKS 

Standard on the Leading Railroads 
Made in Canada. 
Stock carried for immediate shipment. 

Manufactured only by 



A. 0. NORTON, 

C0ATIC00K, 
Prov. QUEBEC. 



STOCK CARRIED BY 
MUSSENS LIMITED, - Montreal and Winnipeg 




H & E PATENT BALL BEARING LIFTING 
JACKS 

for Railway Work, Contractors' 
and Builders' Use 




These Jacks are built of the best 
grades of malleable iron and steel, 
and for speed, convenience or 
durability are unequalled. 

Made in pla'n and foot lift 
styles, fully guaranteed. 

Manufactured by 



H & E Lifting Jack Company 

WATERVILLE, QUE. 

Stock carried by F.H. HOPKINS & CO. 
Montreal 




THE SCOTIA ENGINEERING WORKS 

11-13-15 BUSBY JANE. MONT REAL 

Engine and Boiler Makers 
Brass and Iron Founders 
Coppersmiths . : . Blacksmith 

Marine Work a Specialty 

All kinds of Presses and 
Machine Repairs 

T.O.SINCLAIR - PROPRIETOR 

Formerly Partner Hall Engineering Works 





AIR TOOLS 

ARE SUPREME 

MECHANICALLY 
AND ECONOMICALLY. 

They are easily superior to all others in power, durability, ease of handling 
economy of air consumption and general efficiency. THOR TOOIjB are simple 
in construction ; they run without vibration, and little attention and repairB are 
necessary. ADOPTED AS THE STANDARD IN THE PRINCIPAL 
PLANTS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

SENT ON THIRTY DAYS' TRIAL— express charges paid both ways if 
unsatisfactory. WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE MATTER. 

Made in 50 different Rizes, covering every possible Air Tool requirement. 
Exclusive Canadian Agents— H. W. PETRIE, LTD., 131 Front St. W., Toronto 
Cor. St. James and Little St. Antoine Sta., Montreal ; 422 Abbot St., Vancouver 



INDEPENDENT PNEUMATIC TOOL CO. 

CHICAGO NEW YORK PITTSBURG SAN FRANCISCO 



Union Drawn Steel Co., Lid. 



Hamilton, 



Ontario 




Manufacturers of 



Bright Finished Steel Shafting and Shapes 

Large Stock of all Sizes. Send for Price List, 



The Alexander Engraving Co. 

Half-tone Cuts and Zinc Etchings 
Designing & Drawing. 

We are producing the very highest 
quality of machinery cuts from re- 
touched photos and wash drawings. 
We want your next order. 
Write Us, Phone Us or Call 

352 ADELAIDE ST. WEST, TORONTO. 



- Cut Gears - 

•Theoretically Correct- 
RAWHIDE OR METAL 



Robert Gardner &5on1l d 

/togarettWt..^ AIONTI^EAL 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing lo advertisers. 



8o 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 







PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



CONSULTING ENGINEERS, PATENT ATTOR- 
NEYS. ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS, ETC. 




J. M. ROBERTSON, LIMITED 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

Mechanical. Electrical, Hydraulic, Steam, Gas. 

Plant, Specifications, Estimates, 
Teats. Reports and Supervision. 

Suite 101. Board of Trade Blrig ., Montreal, Que. 



The DUCKWORTH BOYER 

ENGINEERING AND INSPECTION COMPANY, LIMITED 
Inspecting and Consulting Engineers 

Mill, Shop and Field Inspection of Bridges and Structural Work a Specialty; Tests of Materials of 
Construction; also Mill Inspection of Rails and Track Supplies; Foundry Inspection of Steel and 
Iron Castings of all Classes ; Boiler and Marine Plates, etc. 

Expert Examinations and Reports. 
OFFICE: 171 ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL, P. QUE. 



Huhn Patent 
Metallic Packing 

( Self Lubricating) 

Over half million sets in use on Engines, 
Pumps, Air Compressors and Refrigerat- 
ing Machinery — for Steam, Water, Air, 
Gas, Acids, Ammonia, C O 2 , Brine, 
Oils, Tar, Varnish, etc. 

Reciprocating or Rotary Motion Rods, 
Plungers and Packed Pistons. 

BAIN & MITCHELL, 

Y.M.C.A. Building, MONTREAL 



SWIFT MOTOR GAR GO. 

CHATHAM, ONT. 

Contracts Solicited for 

Special Machinery, 

Automobile Parts, 
Tools, Jigs, Fixtures, 
Etc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

THE "SWIFT" 
MARINE ENGINE 



EUGENE C. BROWN 

Engineer and Patent Lawyer 

McGill Bldg., Washington, D.C., U.S.A. 

Nine Years Examiner U.S. Patent Office, Divs. of 
Electricity, Hydraulics and Harvesters. 

Patents Solicited and suits conducted. 

Investigation of infringement or validity of 
Patents. 

United States offers best opportunity for inventions 



HARRY S. JEFFERY 

"The Boiler Eipert." 600 Heeler Sl.,Wishin(!lon, D.C. 

Late Principal School of Boiler Making, Interna- 
tional Correspondence School 

Boilers. Tanks. Stacks and Stand Pipes de- 
signed : estimates furnished and specifica- 
tions Prepared. 



School of Mining 

A College of Applied Science 

Affiliated to Queen's University 

KINGSTON, ONT. 

Science and Engineering 
Mining 
Civil 

Mechanical 
Electrical 
Power Development 

For calendar write the Secretary 



HANBURY 


A. 


BUDDEN 


Advocate 






Patent Agent. 


New York Life 


Build 


ing 


MONTREAL. 


Cable Address 


BREVET 


MONTREAL. 



ATENTS 



J PRQ_MPTLY SECURED! 

We solicit the business of Manufacturers, 
Engineers and others who realize the advisabil- 
ity of having their Patent business transacted 
by Experts. Preliminary advice free. Charges 
moderate. Our Inventor's Adviser sent upon 
request. Marion & Marion, New York L,if e Bldg, 
Montreal ; and Washington, D.C, U.S.A. 

PATITUT© TRADE MARKS 
M I L.n I O AND DESIGNS 
PROCURED IN ALL C0UNTRIE8 

Special Attention given to Patent Litigation 
Pamphlet sent free on application. 

RIDOUT & MAYBEiE gSSS^tSSTSSS 



TORONTO 




FETHERSTQNHAUGH & GO. 

PATENT SOLICITORS & EXPERTS 

Fred, B. Fetherstonhaugh. M.E. , Barriiter- 
at-law and Counsel and expert In Patent 
Onuses. Charles W. Taylor, B.Sc, formerly 
Examiner In Can. Patent Office. 

HEAD OFFICE, ROYAL BANK BLDG., 10 KING ST. E. TORONTO 

MONTREAL OFFICE. CANADA LIFE BLDG. 

Officii In Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver and Washington 



fO 

cJW 



$0. 



& 



ttwjj 



PMENl 

P^S5fc®bN 

G SAND 



^ 



CO 






vt- 



Telegraphic Address 
"HALLTYNE" 



WORKS 

Phone Main 266 



THE HALL ENGINEERING WORKS 

14 TO 16 JURORS STREET, MONTREAL 



ENGINEERS, BOILERMAKERS, BRASS & IRON FOUNDERS, 
COPPER SMITHS & BLACKSMITHS, SHIP REPAIRS A SPECIALTY 

Agents for J. & E. Hall's Refrigerating Machinery. 

Atlas Preservative Co. & United Asbestos Co. 

W. H. Allen, Son & Co., Ltd. 

ENGLAND 



THOMAS HALL 



Phone Wen 17 J 7 



Late Supt. Engineer Messrs. Elder 
Dempster & Co. & Can. Pac. Rly. Co., London 



The advertiser -Mould like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell hint. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



81 




We also manufacture 

Wire Cloth for all purposes 

Concrete Reinforcement 

Molders' Riddles and Bellows 

Metal Clothes Lockers 

Steel Factory Stools 

Window Guards 

Ornamental Wire and 
Iron Work 



DON'T RUN RISKS 

DIFFERENT purposes require ropes of varying constructions and qualities. Your best policy is to 
buy your ropes from experts, stating conditions under which the rope is to be operated. Green- 
ing's Wire Rope is the best on the market. Made from wire specially imported from the world's 
best producers of wire for rope making. All wire used in Greening Ropes is subjected to a complete set 
of the severest tests before being made into rope. You may rely upon it absolutely. 

The B. Greening Wire Co. 

LIMITED 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 




High Grade Malleable Castings 

of all sizes and kinds 

Gait Malleable Iron Co., Limited - Gait, Ontario 



We build nine sizes of 
Stokers, capacity from 
25 to 2000 lbs. coal per 
hour. 




Our Furnaces Heat Steel with 
the Cheapest Fuel on Earth 

SOFT, SLACK COAL 

They are all fired with American" Mechanical Stokers, which burn 
bituminous slack coal automatically and without smoke, and give a 
clear, steady, soft, non-scaling flame. You get increased production, 
at about one-third to one-half the operating cost of oil or hard coal. 
This is a fact- If you burn money to heat steel why not burn less 
of it, and write us at once ? 



(Ufa g>tanbar& Engineering (Efltnpang ICtmtteb. 



47 Wellington Street East Toronto, Canada 

Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



82 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Machinery Wanted and For Sale 



AGENT WANTED. 



AGENT WANTED by old established London firm 
fjr the salt of Electric Passenger and Goods 
Lif's in Canada Must have recognised busi- 
ness and good connection. Box 20, CANADIAN 
MACHINERY, 88 Fleet St., London. Eng. (II) 

FOR SALE. 

FOR SALE -Waterloo Iron Works, in town of Water 
lio, Quebec, in centre of the Eastern Townships. 
Plant comprises Foundry, machine shop, stove 
mounting and wood shops, and boilerhouse brick 
buildings, galvanized iron roofs— all in go»d repair. 
Canadian Pacific and Central Vermont Railways run 
through the town— works situated only a few rods from 
former. Splendid opportunity for any who wish to 
engage in manufacturing. Terms reasonable. Address, 
Waterloo Iron Works, Waterloo, Quebec. (8) 

FOR SALE. -Jobbing Machine Shop and Foundry 
Business, located in Western New Yoik, estab- 
lished over 50 years. Has large and very profit- 
able trade 75 '. of the capital stockcan be bought for 
$65,000.00, worth $100, 000. 00 at least. Fine equip- 
ment of tools and well organized working force. 
This is not a debt encumbered concern that needs 
financing, no extra capital required for operating, 
but a going concern that owners want to sell on 
account of other interests preventing personal 
attention. For further particulars, address R. W. 
Gardner, 821 Railway Exchange Building, Chicaeo, 
IIK (10) 

FOR SALE— Belting, pipe rails, pulleys, shafting, 
hangers, chains, all sizes, new and used, half- 
price Also cotton waste and wipers. Imperial 
Waste and Metal Co., Queen St., Montreal. (1111) 

MACHINERY TOR SALE. 

FOR SALE— 48" x 12' Iron Planer. Sellers pat- 
tern. Good condition. Gilson Manufacturing 
Co., Limited, Guelph, Ont. (1) 

FOR SALE— One single hoisting friction engine, with 
extra large boiler on wheels, in perfect order 12 
horse power. Apply William Welsh, 77 Jurors 
Street, Montreal. I 12) 

MARINE GASOLINE MOTORS of unexcelled 
quality ; iump spark type ; two to eighteen horse- 
power; pleased to show our motors; send for 
new catalogue. Midland Engine Works Company, 
Midland, Ont. (Ill) 

FOR SALE — 2 new 34" square x 10 ft. Planers, 
d»ubleheads. 2 second-hand 40" x 46" x 10ft. 
Planers, double heads, rebuilt, practically good 
at new, Immediate delivery. NEW HAVEN MFG. 
CO., New Haven, Conn. (7) 







MACHINERY WANTED. 

NE PRESS, foot power preferred. Also ^ or l A 
h.p. alt. current motor, 104 volt, 60 cycle. E. D. 
Smith, Magog, Que. 



TRAVELER WANTED. 



FOR LEASE. 



FOR LEASE — Brass and Aluminum Foundry in In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. Thoroughly modern in 
equipment and appliances. Did a business last 
year of nearly $200,000. Second largest automobile 
centre in the United States, over thirty automobile 
factories in city and vicinity. Present owner e n gaged 
in other business requiring his time. Address Frank 
E. Janes, care F. E. Janes Coal and Grain Co. India- 
napolis, Ind. (6) 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



w 



FOR SALE -A complete set of patterns and equip- 
ment for the manufacture of an improved line of 
iron toys, such as trains, hose carts, hook and 
ladd:n. engines, pistols, banks, stoves, etc. An es- 
tablished demand for this particular line of toys. 
Everything nec-ssary for the successful manufacturing 
of same. Very fine proposition for anyone Interested. 
Reason fordiscontinuing manufacture lack of factory 
room on account of heavy lines of other materials. 
Address Box 107, CANADIAN MACHINERY, To- 
ronto. 

THE PEMBROKE ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., LTD., 
have (he following Maohinery for sale, which will 
be sold separately, or as a unit. 
This Plan( comprises the complete outfit of their 
steam station, and Is in first class running order. 
2 return boilers— 14' x 66" (tubular) 
1 " " I2'x54" 

I Wheelock Engine— 15" x34", speed 95 R.P.M. 
I " Tandem Compound Engine— 9" x 24" & 

17" x 24"— speed 95 R.P.M. 

1 Generator. 3 phase. 225 K.W.. 60 cycles, 2200 
volts, 450 revolutions. 
1 40 amp. Exciter. 
1 Marble Panel with Instruments. 
1 Jet Condenser 
1 Duplex Steam Pump. 

50 feet 4" shaft with pulleys, including 2 friction 
pulleys 

I double leather belt— 50' x 30". 

' -73' x 22" 

| " " " - 70' x 16" 

PEMBROKE ELECTRIC LIGHT CO , LTD. 
Pembroke, Ontario (tf) 

The advertiser wo 



ANTED— A small Machine Shop to rent, with 
option of buying. Box 91, CANADIAN 
MACHINERY, Toron(o (11) 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



ENGINEER, power gas, (ake oharge of complete 
plan(, engines and producers. Experience erect- 
ing, testing and running; undertake all repairs; 
first class electrical experience, sound technical know- 
ledge, excellent references ; prefer Ontario or British 
Columbia. R. BELL, 128 14th St., Brandon, Man. 

FOREMAN Moulder is desirous of achange. First- 
class moulder; well up in modern methods of 
foundry practice; exceptional experience; good 
references. Box 88, CANADIAN MACHINERY, 
Toronto. (9) 



PRACTICAL MACHINIST desires position as 
•*• general foreman or superintendent. Good sys- 
tematize^ with executive ability. Can handle all 
grades of labor. Box 106, CANADIAN MACHIN- 
ERY, Toronto. (6) 

PATTERN MAKER— Young energetic pattern 
maker, fourteen years' experience, two as fore- 
man, desires position as foreman. Good 
executive ability and thorough knowledge of drawing 
and foundry practice. Address Box 90, CANADIAN 
MACHINERY, Toronto (11) 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 

WANTED — Mechanical Draughtsman on jig and 
tool design and general mechanical shop equip- 
ment. Give particulars of previous experience 
and salary expected. Box 89, CANADIAN MACHIN- 
ERY, Toronto (11) 

WANTED - Competent foreman for plate shop 
where layer out is kept. Work consists prin- 
cipally of water and air-tight tanks, and «ome 
light steel fabrication, such as fire escapes. Apply 
Box 92, CANADIAN MACHINERY, Toronto. (11) 



BELTING. PACKING. ETC. 



BELTING, RUBBER, CANVAS AND LEATHER, 
Hose Packing, Blacksmith's and Mill Supplies at 
lowest price. N. Smith, 138 York Street, 
Toronto. (2tf) 



RUBBER STAMPS. ETC. 



R CAIRNS, MANUFACTURER OF RUBBER 
stamps, stencils, steel stamps, burning brands. 
77-79 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ont. (tf) 



ENGLISH FIRM of high class machine tool makers 
requires services Canadian representative to 
workon commission. Apply Box No. 27, CANA- 
DIAN MACHINERY, 88 Fleet St , London, England. 

(8) 



PATENTS. 



THE PROPRIETOR of the Canadian Patents, Not. 
1 1 9683 and 1 1 4649, " Improvements in Multiple 
Cylinder, Internal Combustion Engines," and 
" Improvements in Reversible Valve-Gear for Interna 
Combustion Engines, Steam Engines, Air Compre- 
sors and the like," is desirous of entering Into arrange- 
ments by way of license or otherwise for practically 
working the patents. For particularsapply KLAUSER 
& CO., 9 Frledrich St., Berlin, Germany. (6) 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



A BOOK-KEEPING STAFF IN ITSELF — doing 
the work with machine-precision and accuracy, 
the National Cash Register. Write us for demon- 
stration literature. National Cash Register Co., 285 
Yonge St., Toronto. 

AT LAST — A really practical psncil sharpener. 
The "Splro" sharpener built on a new principle, 
positively does not break the lead. Ten blades. 
Sharpener lasts lifetime. Every pencil user needs 
one. Pencil sharp in a second. Ask your stationer 
or write us direct. A. R. MacDougall & Co., Canadian 
Agents, Toronto. 

ACCURATE COST KEEPING IS EASY if you 
have a Dey Cost Keeper. It automatically re- 
cords actual time spent on each operation down 
to the decimal fraction of an hour. Several operations 
of jobs can be recorded on one card. For small firms 
we recommend this as an excellent combination— em- 
ployees' time register and cost keeper. Whether you 
employ a few or hundreds of hands, we can supply you 
with a machine suited to your requirements. Write 
forcatalog. International Time Recording Company 
of Canada, Ltd. Office and factory, 29 Alice Street, 
Toronto. 

BUSINESS MEN, professional iren, merchants and 
church workers, find innumerable uses for 
Fulton Sign and Price Markers. The Fulton 
Rubber Type Company of Elizabeth, N.J. , are makers 
of Ink Pads, Daters and Business Outfits of high 
quality. Sold bv all stationers. A. R. MacDougall 
& Co., Toronto, Canadian Agents. 

COPELAND-CHATTERSON SYSTEMS - Short, 
simple. Adapted to all classes of business. 
Copeland-Chatterson-Crain, Ltd., Toronto and 
Ottawa. (tf) 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE. An Otls-Fensom 
hand-power elevator will double your floor space, 
enable you to use tha,t upper floor either as stock 
room or as extra selling space, at the same time in- 
creasing space on your ground floor. Costs only $70. 
Write for catalogue " B." The Otls-Fensom Elevator 
Co., Traders Bank Building, Toronto. (tf) 

DURING 1910 the MONARCH displaced hun- 
dreds of Typewriters of all makes. In 1911 we 
anticipate a still greater demand. We have cut 
down the allowance on these second-hand machines 
and constquently cm sell them cheaper to you. They 
are carefully rebuilt and are guaranteed to give satis- 
faction or your monev back. If you want a good, 
strong, clean working Typewriter at a mere fraction 
of the original cost, write us for catalogue. THE 
MONARCH TYPEWRITER CO., Ltd, 46 Adelaide 
S'reet West, Toronto, Ont. 

EGRY business systems are devised to suit every 
department of every business. They are labor 
and time savers. Produce results up to the 
requirements of metchants and manufacturers. In- 
quire from our nearest office. Egry Register Co., 
Daytin, Ohio; 123 Bay St., Toronto; 258^ Portage 
Ave , Winnipeg; 308 Richards St., Vancouver. 



MANUFACTURING CENTRES. 

CREE FACTORY SITES-Seven railroads, dtep 
1 water, Niagara power, natural gas, low taxation, 
abundant labor. Welland, Ontario. B. J. Mc- 
Cormick. (12y) 

u!d like to knoiv where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



E 1 



v LLIOTT-FISHER STANDARD WRITING-ADD- 
ING MACHINES make toil eas'er. Elliot, 
Fisher, Limited, Room 314, Stair Building- 
Toronto. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



83 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



COUN TBR CHBCK BOOKS — Write us to-day for 
sanples. We are manufacturer* of the famous 
SURETY NON-SMUV duplicating and triplicat- 
ing Counttr Check Books, and Single Carbon P«da 
In all varieties. Dominion Register Co., Ltd., Tor- 
onto. 

ELIMINATE FIRE RISK, aave Insurance, reduce 
maintenance costs and save money on your actual 
building work by using the Kahn System of Fire- 
proof Construction. Used In many of the largest 
business premises on this continent. Write for cata- 
logue. Trussed Concrete Steel Company of Canada, 
Limited, Walker Rd., Walkervllle, Ont. 

GET THE BUSINESS — Increase your sales— Use 
Multigraph typewritten letters. The Multlgraph 
does absilutely every form of printing. Saves 
you 25 p. c. t> 75 p.c. of your printing bill. Multi- 
graph your office forms, letterheads, circular letters. 
Write us. American Multigraph Sales Co., Ltd., 129 
Bay Street Toronto. 

IF YOU have been afflicted with one of those foun- 
tain pens that won't write when you want it to, or 
leaks when you don't want it to, give it away to one 
of your poorrelatlons and buy a Moore Non-Leakable 
Fountain Pen and you will be happy. Consult your 
stationer. W.J. Gage & Co., Toronto, sole agent* 
for Canada. 



INDISPENSABLE in office, store, home— Canadian 
Almanac, 191 1 —a Natioaal Directory. Complete 
classified Informat'on on evry subject of Domin- 
ion Interest. Full Postage, Customs, Banking, Insur- 
ance, Legcl, Educational, Newspaper, Army, Clerical, 
Governmental, Particulars of leading Institutions and 
Societies. Paper Covers, 60c. Cloth, Leather Back, 
75c. All stationers, orsent postpaid on receipt of 
price by The Copp-Clark Co., Ltd , Toronto. 

KAY'S FURNITURE .CATALOGUE No. 306 con- 
tains 160 pages of fine half-tone engravings 
of newest designs In Carpets, Rugs, Furniture, 
Draperies, Wall Papers and Pottery with Cash prices. 
Write for a copy— it's free. John Kay Company, Ltd., 
36 King St. West, Toronto. 

MODERN FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION-Our 
system of reinforced concrete work, as success- 
fully used in many of Canada's largest build- 
ings, gives better results at lower cost. "A strong 
statement," you will say. Write us and let us prove 
our claims. That's fair. Leach Concrete Co., Ltd., 
100 King St. West, Toronto. (tf) 

MR BUSINESS MAN, are you progressive? It's 
up to you to test "Consolidated," our new pro- 
cess carbon paper. Because it costs less. Soft 
finish, without smutting, and clear, permanent copies. 
Write for sample sheets and prices. "Consolidated." 
Stratford, Ont. 



SYSTEMS" stand for all that Is best in loose-leaf 
binders and supplies, letter-heads, statements 
and in fact your office stationeryof every des- 
cription. Send us samples of what you are using— we 
will send you prices that will interest you. Business 
Systems, Limited, Manufacturing Stationers, Toronto. 

(tf) 

WAREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING SYS 
ThMS. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by the trade throughout Canada, (tf) 

SHOP AGENT WANTED. 

WE want an agent in every machine shop in Canada 
where fifteen or more men are employed, to take 
subscriptions to this Journal. Subscriptions are 
easily obtained and the work can be carried on by giving 
a few minutes to it in the noon hour. Liberal commis- 
sions allowed both for new subscriptions and for renew- 
als. Write for terms. Agents' Dept. CANADIAN 
MACHINERY, 143 149 University Ave., Toronto. 

When writing advertiser* kindly men- 
tion having seen the advertisement in 
thif paper. 



/(JFK/N MACH,NE DIVIDED RULES 

^ * ARE STANDARDS OF ACCURACY AND MATERIALS 



Our catalog tells about their many superior features. 
It's sent free on request. 



th e /ufk/n Rule (?o. ofQanada. Ltd. 
V/1ND20R.0NT. 



British Catalog Register 

The Firms and Companies whose names appear in this "Register" will be pleased to send their Catalogues and Lists, 
promptly, on receipt of request for same. Correspondents are requested in all cases to use business stationery. 


All types of 

LOCOMOTIVES 

built by 

R. & W. Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. 

Engineers Limited 
NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE. ENGLAND 

Catalogues on application. Established 1817 


MACHINE TOOLS 

of every description and size for 

Engineers, Shipbuilders, Boilermakers, 

&c, &c. 

LATHES A SPECIALTY 

Dempster, Moore & Co., Ltd. 

Robertson St., GLASGOW 


BERTRAMS LIMITED 

Engineers 

Sciennes, EDINBURGH 

PAPER MILL MACHINERY 

and 

MACHINE TOOLS for IRON WORKERS 

Catalogues offered to Purchasers. 


GEO. RICHARDS & CO. Ltd. 

Broadheath near Manchester, 
ENGLAND 
MACHINE TOOLS 
Pulleys, Shafting and Shaft Fittings, Air Com- 
pressors, Sand Blast Apparatus. 


WILLIAM MORGAN & CO., LTD. 

EGL1NTON ENGINE WORKS 

Kilwinning, Scotland 

Makers of all kinds •( Electric, Steam and 
Hand Cranes. 

Illustrated booklet on application. 


JOHN STIRK & SONS 

Limited 

MACHINE TOOLS 

HALIFAX - - - ENGLAND 


THOMAS A. ASHTON, Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD. ENG. 

Mill-Gearing Engineers 

High-Grade Goods 

Reasonable Prices 

On Government Lists Established 1866 


C. W. Burton, Griffiths & Co. 

Ludgate Square, London, E. C, England 
and at Manchester and Glasgow. 

Modern Metal Working Machine Tools 
Burton Patent Disc Grinders 

Special Machines fer the Automobile Industry 


MACHINE TOOLS 

Specialties: — 

Boring & Turning Mills 'Single & Duplex Types 

Multiple Spindle Drilling, Tapping & Boring 

Machines. 

Automatic Profile Milling Machines 

WEBSTER & BENNETT LTD. 

COVENTRY, England 

Cablegrams : "Profile Coventry. ' 


FRANK PEARN&CO.,Ltd. 

Manchester, Eng. 

PUMPING MACHINERY 

driven by Steam, Electric Motor, Gas or Oil Engines 


H. W. WARD & CO., Ltd. 

MACHINE TOOL MAKERS 
92 Lionel Street, Birmingham 

Specialities— Capstan and Turret Lathes, Tool- 
makrrs' Lath»s, Milling Machines, Grinding 
Machines, Drilling Machines. 

Telegrams— "Tudor, " Birmingham 


WE HOLD THE LARGEST RANGE IN THE WORLD 

All Types and Patterns 


Before purchasing any type of Injector or Elevator 
be sure to send for our latest catalogues and best 
terms. It will save you money to do so. 

THE WHITE INJECTOR CO., Engineer. 

Pendleton - Manchester - England 


High-Speed Surfacing and Boring Machine 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



84 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



You May Have This Book 
Without Spending a Cent 

if you are a subscriber to "Canadian 
Foundrvman," by sending to in us four new- 
paid-up subscriptions. If you are not a 
subscriber send in your own, along with 
the proper number of paid-up subscriptions 
and the book is yours. 

Foundry Work 

By Wm. C. Stimpson 

Head Instructor in Foundry Work and Forg- 
ing, Department of Science and Technology, 
I 'nit t Institu 

160 pp., 150 illus. Cloth binding. A 
practical guide to modern methods 
of molding and casting in iron, 
brass, bronze, steel and other met- 
als, from simple and complex pat- 
terns, including many valuable hints 
on shop management and equip- 
ment, useful tables, etc. 

Price, $1.00 

Given free with four yearly paid-up 
subscriptions. 

The subscription price is fifty cents per 
year ; two years for one dollar. 

Canadian Foundryman 

143-149 University Avenue, Toronto 




smsism 



TRADE. MMlK-RtG. U.S. PAT. :T0FK': 



-ON 





Before Using 
Smooth-On Castings 



After Using 
Smooth-On Castings 



CHEAPEST AND BEST CEMENT ON 
THE MARKET FOR FOUNDRY USE 

Sold in Yellow Label Cans. 

Send lor Illustrated Catalog and Prices of the Different Smooth-On Cements 

Smooth-On Manufacturing Go. 

JERSEY CITY, New Jersey, U. S. A. 
FOR SALE BY SUPPLY HOUSES 



USE BASSITE 

AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR TIN IN YOUR BRASS CASTINGS. 
WHY? BECAUSE BASSITE MAKES CASTINGS STRONG- 
ER, CLEANER, TIGHTER, SMOOTHER AND 
DENSER THAN IS POSSIBLE WITH TIN. 

Does this difference in cost appeal to you ? 

Tin at 36c per lb., quantity one ton, $720.00 



Bassite " 22c 



440.00 



Actual saving in cost per ton, $280.00 

Let us ship you 100 pounds on approval. No pay, unless satisfactory. 

MAKE A HIT WITH YOUR BALANCE SHEET 
AND ORDER NOW. 

The Bassite Smelting & Mfg. Co., 

Incorporated 
Cincinnati and Milford, Ohio 



OPAL GLASS TILING 

FOR WALLS OP 

MACHINERY AND POWER HOUSES 

Tost approved material. 
TORONTO PLATE CLASS IMPORTING OO'Y 

rLATB AMD WINDOW (LIU 

136 to 143 Vlotorla St.. - Toronto 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention Is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions striotly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patent* 
sent tree. Oldest apency for securing patent*. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. rocelTB 
special notice, without c harg e, lntho 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms for 
Canada, $:s.75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by 

aU uewhrtealers. 

MUNN & Co. 36,B ' oadway New York 

Branch Offlce, W> Y St.- Washington, D. C. 



TRAVELERS 



Hfisc 



HOISTS 



9 



Y NORTHERN HIGH GRADE CRANES. \ 
NORTHERN ENGINEERING WORKS. 



COALI NC-MO I STS 



Detroit Mich USA 



JIB AND PILLAR 



THE BEST MELTER AND THE BEST MADE CUPOLA IS THE 




LADlE8 



NEWTEN 



CUPOLA 



TRUCK8 



14 sizes 



Free Catalogue 



Canadian Department. ADVANCE MACHINE WORKS, Ltd., Walkerville, Ont. 



NORTHERN ENGINEERING WORKS, Detroit, Mich., U. 8. A. 
Canadian Department, ADVANCE MACHINE WORK*, Ltd., Walkerville, Ont. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



85 



How about that "Bum" Casting ? 



Do you ship it 
out at a profit? 




or do you consign it 
to the scrap-heap? 



Profit- or Lo^? 



Sheltoh Metallic Filler 



will keep your scrap-pile corner empty. It will fill in 
all sand-holes, blow-holes, cracks and minor defects, 
so that the casting will pass the closest inspection. 

It cannot be detected, and is as durable as the cast- 
ing itself. If you use Shelton Metallic Filler, you will 
avoid all make-overs. 




There will be no delays--every 
casting will reach its destination 
on time. 

NO MAKE OVERS ■ NO SCRAP HEAP 
NO LOSSES. 

Shelton Metallic Filler means greater profits. 

SHELTON 
METALLIC FILLER CO, 

DERBY, CONN. 
Canadian Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co., Toronto and Montreal 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



s 


A LIGHT POWER SQUEEZER FOR 
BENCH WORK 

and a complete line of 

FOUNDRY MOULDING MACHINES FOR ALL KINDS 
OF FOUNDRY WORK 

Standard and Other Types to Suit Conditions 

THE TABOR MANUFACTURING CO. 

18th and HAMILTON STS., PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 




Geo. Anderson & Co., Ltd 

86 Notre Dame St. West 
MONTREAL 

and CARNOUSTIE, SCOTLAND. 



Makers all sizes of 



Photo of 5-ton Motor Travelling Crane, 60-foot span 



Travelling Cranes 
Electric Derricks 
Steam Derricks 
Locomotive Cranes 

Send for catalogue and Prices. 




Whiting Electric 
Travelers and 

Cranes of all kinds 

Constructed 
for Service 



Scientific Design, First-class Con- 
struction, Improved Brakes, 
Movements under per- 

Four 20-Ton Electric Traveling Cranes. Foundry of Illinois Steel Co., South Chicago, 111. feet Control. 

COMPLETE EQUIPMENT FOR FOUNDRIES 

Grey Iron, Brass, Car Wheel, Pipe, Malleable and Steel. 

Buildings Designed. Equipment^Installed. Complete Plant Delivered to Purchasers Ready to Operate. 



If it's Foundry 

Equipment, 

think of " Whiting " 



Whiting Foundry Equipment Co. 

HARVEY, ILLS. (Chicago Suburb) 



Manufacturers 

Engineers 

Designers 



The advertiser would like to know where \ou saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



37 



James Dougall & Sons, Limited 

BONNYSIDE FIREBRICK WORKS 
Bonnybridge, Scotland 



Best Scotch Firebricks 



Special Grades for Blast Furnaces, Hot Blast 
Stoves, Steel Works, Brick, Lime and Cement Kilns, 
By-Product and Bee Hive Coke Ovens and Cupolas, 
Boiler Seating Blocks, Flue Covers, Dry Ground Fire- 
clay, Foundry Ganister. 



A.B.C., 5th Edition. 



Gables, "Ganister, Bonnybridge" 



UNITED FIRE BRICK Company 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 

HIGH GRADE FIRE BRICK, SILICA BRICK, 
SPECIAL SHAPES, AND DUST. 

Special Brandt for Foundry, Rolling Mill and Steel Planti, Cement 
and Lime Kilns, Glass Plants, Bee-Hive and Bi-Product Coke Ovens 
Boiler Settings, Forge (oil or gas) Furnaces, etc. 



MAIN OFFICE: 

First National Bank Building, 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 



BRANCH SALES OFFICr : 
1601 Arrott Building, 
PITTSBURG, PA. 



Canadian Sales Agent : W.F.MARSHALL, 97 King St. West, Toronto 
Long Distance Telephone Main 6054 Toronto 



Detroit Solvay Coke 

AVERAGE ANALYSIS 

91% Carbon, 8% Ash and 65/100% Sulphur. 

The analysis of contents of every car is shown on everyjmvoice. 

Insures Increased Melt 

and Extra Fine Castings. 

BAIRD QL WEST 

DETROIT 

Sole Selling Agents Detroit Ovens, 





Offices and Warehouse, cor. Lamed 
and Third Streets, Detroit 



FREDERIC B. STEVENS 

Manufacturer 

Foundry Facings 

Foundry Supplies 

Buffing Compositions 

and 

Platers* Supplies 



TORONTO WAREHOUSE : 137 Jarvis Street 

Mr. J. M. Mayers, Resident Manager 

Telephone No. Main 6355 

This means direct representation, large warehouse stock and good service 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



88 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



FIRE BRICK 

AMERICAN and SCOTCH 



eV-KSTEE^ 



i 



of 



r RAMSAY 



4 9- -> 



CUPOLA BLOCKS and all 
other SPECIAL SHAPES 

For Foundries, Blast Furnaces, Rolling 
Mills, Steel Plants, Cement and Lime 
Kilns, Glass Plants, Boiler Settings, etc. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS 
from our stock in Toronto, or direct from Works. 

The Ontario Lime Association 

LMITED 
118 Esplanade East, - TORONTO 



OFRI 



IM 



"Emergency" Cupola 



is a most excellent little 
melter, and has been exten- 
sively adopted both at home 
and abroad, including' several 
Government departments. 



Full 
Particulars 

on 
Application 



We are also 
makers of 

The Rapid 

"Economic" 

Cupola 

and complete 

Foundry 

Melting 

Equipments. 

FEED-WATER 

HEATERS, 

FILTERS, &c. 




■ 



GEORGE GREEN & CO. 

FOUNDRY ENGINEERS 

KEIGHLEY, - ENGLAND 

Cable Address: "CUPOLA," Keighley. 



A GOLD MINE 

may be at your disposal on your very 
premises. Look out of your side win- 
dow or back door and see if you have 
not an accumulation of cupola dump, 
and other foundry refuse, which is a 
total loss to you in its present state. 
Why not add to your profits and install 
one of the Sly Patent Cinder Mills to 
reclaim this iron and be astonished at 
your former loss and pocket the rich re- 
turns from your newly-discovered mine. 

Sly's Patent Iron Cinder Mill will 

save 95% of the coke contained in your 

cupola dump, and gangway scrapings. 

Iron is valuable, then why throw it in 

the dump? Iron recovered by this Mill 

is better than machinery scrap. Study 

economy in a foundry and your profits will increase accordingly. Mill will pay for itself three 

or four times every year, and we have records of Mill paying for itself twelve times a year. Let 

uj> know amount of your daily melt and we will quote. Write for Cinder Mill Catalogue F. 

We also manufacture Cleaning Mills, Dust Arresters, Sand Blast and Foundry Equipment. 

THE W. W. SLY MFG. CO., CLEVELAND, O. 




I 

R 
O 

N 



SLY'S PATENT IRON CINDER MILL 
Patented, No. 514097. Patented, No. 841728. 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



fe 







JgHpt 



GLUTRIN 



GLUTRIN 

For Cores 



Robeson Process Company 

Grand Mere, P.Q. 

Selling Agents : 

FRANCIS HYDE & COMPANY 

31 Wellington Street 
MONTREAL, CANADA 



Interesting News 



Foundrymen 




and 



Machinists 

Cyclone 
Hoists 

High Speed 



EFFIC'ENCY = 80%.— The hoists will raise two tons one 
foot, with 125 pounds pull, overhauling only 39 ] /2 feet 
hand chain. AUTOMATIC BRAKE immediately locks 
when hand chain is released. 

FOR OTHER POINTS ASK 
US FOR OUR CATALOG 

Have you tried our ACME PARTING in your foundry? 
Ask for samples. 

Ontario Wind Engine &. Pump Co., Limited 



WINNIPEG TORONTO 

foundry Supply Dept. 



CALGARY 



■tflfc 






- . 6 i 




Mi ss ss ssTsss 



-^tj 





JONATHAN BARTLEY liRUCIBLE CO. 



IfTRENTON, N. J., U.S.A. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Crucibles of Quality 

Don't fail to mention "Can-adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



oo 



Canadian Machinery 



Grimes Roll-Over 
Molding Machine 




This is a simple, standard 
machine, requiring small 
floor space. 

It is perfectly balanced, 
requiring no counter-bal- 
ancing mechanism, as 
centre of gravity is centre 
of rotation. 




No. 1 



No. 2 



By means of small hand wheel shown in cut, one man can turn largest flask 
smoothly and without jerk. 

Pattern is drawn by absolutely straight gravity drop. 

This machine is adjustable for deep flasks and can readily take care of flask 
24 in. x 36 in. and 4 to 12 in. in depth, with maximum pattern draft of 12 in. 

Positive adjustable pins at four corners of clamping device, Fig 2, compensate 
for unevenness of floor boards. 

PRICE, f.o.b. cars Windsor, $125.00 

HIGH GRADE CASTINGS are not made with low grade materials. 
Think this over when you see a poorly finished casting in your cleaning 
room, and remember, if you please, if you wisb to place the pattern in the 
high grade class, our No. 48 Plumbago will do it, also that the saving in 
cleaning room expense would pay for three times the necessary No. 48 
Plumbago to have made it high grade. 

Another vital point is that you have a core wash which will peel clean and 
not run before the metal. Try our Eureka Blacking, the best core wash on 
the market. 

The Detroit Foundry Supply Company 



PLATERS' AND 
POLISHERS' 
SUPPLIES 



F 



ACING 
IRE BRICK 
OUNDRY SUPPLIES 
OUNDRY EQUIPMENT 



DETROIT, MICH. 
WINDSOR, ONT. 



We are exclusive selling agents for Homogen 

If you wish a light colored parting equal to Lycopodium, Try our Eureka Parting. 
The advertiser would like to kuozv where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



9* 



HOW TO MAKE 
GOOD CORES 

ECONOMICALLY 



USE 



GLUTRIN 



"Bear in mind that no matter 
how well your iron is purchased 
and mixed by expert metallurg- 
ists, no matter how hot it comes 
from the cupola by the best of 
melting practice, and no matter 
how perfect and clean a mold 
you have made, if you put into 
that mold a poor core, your cast- 
ing will be scrap and your ex- 
pert labor instead of yielding 
revenue will be a complete 
loss." 



We say, without any fear of contradiction, that there is 200 per cent, more 
GLUTRIN used in Canada than all of the other liquid core binders advertised. 

We have customers using it in proportions varying from 1 to 50 to 1 
to 125. 

There is only one substitute for GLUTRIN and that is linseed oil. 
GLUTRIN is 20c. per gallon always— linseed oil to-day is $1.11, probably $1.25 
to-morrow. 

If you have been using linseed oil, have your cost clerk figure out how 
much money you have lost during the past year. It will make interesting 
reading. 

We will send a barrel of GLUTRIN to any foundry in Canada for trial 
purposes, with the understanding that, if not satisfactory, same is not to be 
paid for. 

GLUTRIN can be used successfully with any sand known to the core- 
maker, yet in view of the fact that the variety of these sands is almost without 
limit, it is necessary, now and then, to prepare special instructions for our 
users, which we will be glad to do upon request. 

FRANCIS HYDE & COMPANY 

31 Wellington Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
P.S. — Remember we manufacture all equipment and supplies for brass, steel or iron foundries 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



OJ 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



U 



MORSE 



*5 




TWIST DRILLS 

AND MACHINISTS' TOOLS 

are High Class. The skill of the men who 
make them and the quality of the material 
used guarantee "MORSE" Quality. 
Send for a "Morse" catalogue, illustrated. 



M.TD.&M.CO. 



JT* ~ 



■-■ — - -■ -— * 



Morse Twist Drill & 
Machine Company 

New Bedford, Mass., U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



93 



CANADIAN MACHINERY BUYERS' DIRECTORY 

To Our Readers — Use this directory when seeking to buy any machinery or power equipment. 

You will often get information that will save you money. 
To Our Advertisers — Send in your name for insertion under the heading of the lines you make or sell. 
To Non-Advertisers — A nominal rate of $1 per line a year is charged non-advertisers. 



Abrasive Materials. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd , Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd.. Harailtou. 
Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co., Toronto 
Stevens, F. B , Detroit Mich. 

Air Propellers. 

Matthews ft Yates, Manchester, Eng. 

Air Receivers. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Holden Co. Montreal 

Aluminum. 

Parke ft Leith, Toronto 

Tallin;. 11 Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

Arbors. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Mors" Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Arbor Presses. 

NUes-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Automatic Chucks. 

Garvin Machine Co , New York 

Automatic Index Milling 
Machines. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Automatic Machinery. 

Gardner, Robt. ft Son, Montreal 
Kellogg ft Co , Toronto 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Axle Gutters. 

Butterfleld ft Co., Rook Island, Que. 
A. B. Jardine ft Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Babbit Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Lumen Bearing Co.. Toronto. 
Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 



Ball Bearings 



Chapman Double Ball Bearing Company, 
Toronto 



Balls, Steel. 



Hermann Boker ft Co., Montreal 
John Millen & Son, Montreal 

Barrels, Steel Shop. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland. 

Bars, Boring. 

Hail Engineering Works, Montreal. 
NUes-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Bassite, 

Bassite Smelting Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Belting, Chain. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Jones ft G'asseo, Montreal 

John Millen ft Son, Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Belting, Cotton. 

Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton. 

Belting, Leather. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
J. L. Goodhue & Co., Danville. P.Q. 
Imperial Waste & Metal Co.. Montreal 
McLaren. J. 0., Montreal. 
Sadler ft Haworth. Montreal 

Belting, New and Used. 

Imperial Waste and Metal Co., Montreal 

Bending Machinery. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas. Ont. 
Bertrams Limited. Edinburgh, Scotland 
BUm, E. W., Co , Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Kellogg It Co., Toronto 
Jardine, A B. ft Co.. HestHer. Ont. 
London Maoh. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
National Maohinery Co. , Tiffln. Ohio. 
NUes-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Boilers. 

Canadian General ft Shoe Machinery 

Co., Levis, Que. 
Goldle & McCulloch Co.. Gait. 
The John Inglis Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
Owen 8ound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Robb Engineering Co., Amherst, N. 
Scotia Eng. Company. Montreal 



Standard Engineering, Co., Toronto. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Boiler Compounds. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hail Engineering Works, Montreal. 

Boiler Feed Regulators. 

Standard Engineering Co., Toronto. 

Boiler Makers' Supplies. 

Jno. F. Allen Co., New York 

Boiler Mountings. 

Standard Engineering Co., Toronto. 

Boiler Settings. 

Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 

Bolt and Nut Machinery. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Gardner Robt. ft Son, Montreal 
Kellogg ft Co., Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
National Machinery Co.. Tiffln. Ohio. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co. New York. 
Waterbury Farrell Foundry ft Machine 
Co., Waterbury, Conn. 

Bolt Cutters. 

Kellogg ft Co , Torr nto 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Bolt Cutter Die Sharpener. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Bolt Headers. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Bolt Pointers. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin Ohio 

Boring Machines, Upright. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 

Holden Co. , Montreal 

Kellogg * Co.. Toronto 

London Mach Tool Co., Hamilton. 

Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Boring Machines, Wood. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 

Chicago, IU. 
Kellogg ft Co., Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Boring and Turning Mills. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Bullard Machine Tool Co., Bridgeport, 

Conn 
KellcggftCo, Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mussens I imited, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Box Puller. 

A. B. Jardine 4 Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Boxes, Steel Shop. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland. 
Franois Hyde ft Co., Montreal. 

Boxes, Tote. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland 
F ancis Hyde ft Co., Montreal. 

Brake Shoes 

Holden Co., Montreal 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Brass Working Machinery. 

Gardner. Robt., & Son Montreal 

Mussens Limited Montreal. 

Warner ft Swasey Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 

Brazing Compounds. 

Phillips-Laffitte Co., Philadelphia 

Buckets, Clam Shell. 

Browning Engineering Co,, Cleveland, I) 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Company, 
Harvey, 111. 

Buckets, Grab. 

Browning Engineering Co.. Cleveland, O. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Bulldozers. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Out. 



London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Burners, Fuel Oil. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde * Co. Montreal. 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 
Whit'ng Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Burners, Natural Gas. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde ft Co., Montreal. 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 

Burrs, Iron and Copper. 

Parraenter ft Rul'ock Co , Gananoque 

Calipers. 

Schuchardt & Sohutte, New York 

Canners' Machinery. 

Bliss, E. W., Co., Brooklyn, N.Y 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Car Replacers 

Holden Co., Montreal 
Mont'e^l Steel Works, Montreal 

Car Wheels, Mine 

Montreal Steel Works. Montreal 

Cars, Factory & Warehouse 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
Fr»n«is Hvde ft Co . Montreal. 
Sheld'ns Lim'red. Ga't 
Whitine Foundry Equirment Co., Har- 
vry, Til. 



Cars, Industrial. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Francis H^rle & r*o.. Montreal. 
MiiRqprts T, imited. Montreal. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Castings, Aluminum. 

Lumen Rearing Co.. Toronto 
Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 

Castings, Brass. 

Hall Engineering Worts. Montreal. 

Lumen Bearing Co.. Toronto 

Owen Sound Tron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 
Waterous Engine Works Co. Prantford 

Castings. Grey Iron. 

Oar'n-r Robt. ft Sen. Montreal 
Hall En"tneerine Works, Montreal. 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
.T's Snurt Mf°\ Co . Brockville. Ont 
Waterous Engine Works Co , Brant for 

Castings, Manganese Steel 

Montreal St°el Works, Montreal 

Castings, Malleable. 



Gait Malleable tron Co.. Gait 
Pratt ft T.etehworth, Brantford 
Smiths Falls Malleable Castings 



Co.. 



Smiths Falls 

Castings, Phosphor Bronze. 

Lumen Bearing Co, Toronto 

Castings, Semi-Steel. 

Montreal Steel Works, Monfeal 

Cement. 

Sheltou Metallic Filler Co.. Der >y Conn 

Cement Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Gardner. Robt. ft Son. M'ntreal 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co.. Montreal 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 

Centre Punches. 

The Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo 

Centreing Machines. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
Gardner Robt. ft Son, Montreal 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co.. Mon'real 
London Macb Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 



Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Centrifugal Pumps. 

The John Inglis Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Pratt * Whitney Co , Hartford, Conn. 
Waterous Engine Works Co , Brantfo d 

Chain Blocks. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
John Millen ft Son, Montreal 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 
Schuchault & Schutte, New York 

Chucks, Drill and Lathe. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Oushman < huck Co., Hartf rd, onn 
Gardner Robt. ft Son. Montreal 
S. E. Horton Machine Co., Windsor 

Locks, Conn. 
Jacobs Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 
Ker ft Goodwin. Brantford. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

' .-•'•♦Bedford 
Mussens T.imi'ed, Montreal. 
Nilee-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

3. Ru sell Anti-* riclion Drill Chuck Co 

T Elmire. N Y 
Schuchardt ft Schutte, New York 

Chucks (Planer or Milling.) 

Gardner, Robt. ft Son, Montreal 

Chucking Machines. 

The Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Warner & Swasey Co , Cleveland, Ohio 

Chucks, Universal. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Circuit Breakers. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 

Cloth and Wool Dryers. 

B. Greenine Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Sheldons Limited, Gait 

Clutches. 

Berg Machinery Mfg. Co.. Toronto 
Positive Clutch ft Pulley Works, Toronto 

Coal Boring Machines. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 
Cumming, J. W., New Glasgow, N.8. 

Coal Cutters. 

Canadian Rand Co. , Montreal 

Coal Handling Machinery. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, O 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co , Mortreal 
Standard Engineering Co.. Toronto. 
Waterous Engine Works Co.. Brantford 

Coal Miners' Tools. 

CUmming. J. W , New GlaBgow, N. S, 

Collectors, Pneumatic. 

Sheldons Limited, Gait 

Combination Pliers. 

Reed Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa, 

Compressors, Air. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Westinghouse Co.. Hamilton 
Darling Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal 
Hall Engineering Wo'ks. Montreal, Que. 
Holden Do., Montreal 
Indi pendent Pneumatic Tool Co , Chi- 
cago. 
Mussens Limited. Vontreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co , Hamilton 
Vandeleurft Nichols, Toronto 

Concentrating Plant. 

Gardner. Robt. ftSon, Montreal 

Concrete Mixers. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co . Montreal 
Jeffrey M'g. Co., Montreal 

Condensers. 

Oold'e ft Mt Culloch Co., Gait. 

Hall Engineering Works. Montreal. 

The John [nglis Co . Ltd . Toi 

The Sin art -Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 

Waterous Engine Co , Brantford. 

Consulting Engineers. 

Bain ft Mitchell, Montreal 
Hall Engineering Works. Montreal 
Robertson. J M.. Ltd.. Montreal 
Standard Engineering Co., Toronto 



94 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Controllers and Starters 
Electric Motor. 

Canadian WesUngbouee Oo . Hamilton 

T ft II > ■ ■ Hamilton. 

. N I 

Conveyor Machinery. 

M intreal 
l-oldi-ft st-Cuuoch Co., Gait 
Jeffrey Mfg Oo . Mnntr. al 
Muss • a 1. nut .1. Ma treal 
Tl.- - Hamilton 

i.intford. 

Coping Machines. 

John Bertram * Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
London Mach Tool Oo Hamilton. 
Nllee Bement Pond Co . New York 

Corundum and Corundum 
Wheels. 

u 

Canadian Mart Wheels Ltd. Hamilton 

Counterbores. 

Clcv land Twst Dull Co Cleveland 
Morse Twisl Drill and Machine Co . New 

ir.l 

Countersinks. 

and T«i-t Drill Co . CUt eland 



Couplings. 



Gardner Robt. 4 Son. Montreal 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co, Owen 
Sound 

Couplings, Air. 

Cana nan Rand Co , M^ntreol 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 

Chi. ago 

Cranes, Locomotive. 

ling Engineering Co., C leveland, O 



Electric 



Cranes, Traveling, 
and Hand Power. 



Advance Machine Works Walkerrllle, 

ario 
North- rn Eng Works, Detroit, U.S.A. 

Cranes, Wrecking. 

Browning Engineering Co. Cleveland 

Crank Pin Turning Machine. 

London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Nilt-s-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Crankshafts. 

i teCo., Ltd . Wetland 

Crossings, Diamond Rail 

Montreal Steel Worl b. Montreal 

Crushers, Rock or Ore. 

Jeffrey Mf£ Co., Montreal 

Waieroui- Engin Works Co. B'antfnrd. 

Cut-off Coupling Clutches. 

lie- ' arlyle Johnson Machine Co Man- 
1 'nn. 

Cutters, Flue. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 
Chicago 111. 

Cutters, Pipe. 

•ladian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
A B Jardme 4 C • , Hes eler, Ont. 

Cutter Grinder Attachment 

Cincinnati Hi ling Maohine Co., Cin- 
cinnati 

Cutter Grinders. 

Cincinnati Milling Maohine Co., Cin- 
cinnati 

Oati in York 

M ;■ r r. I ' i., Erie, l'a. 

Cutters, Milling. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
0'>-»eian ■ Twist LhUiOo., b veiat.d 
Oarvr New Yo k 

Mor-eTwie Drhl and Hachini I 

Bedford 
Mussti- l.imi ed. Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

Cutting-off Machines. 

A mstrong Bros. Tool Oo . Chicago 

John llerirarn fcPoasCo Dundas, Ont. 

Qarvfc 

Load .; Oo . Hamilton. 

Muasens ' irnit*-d M< ntr'-al 

Pratt 4 Whitney Oo., Hartford, Conn. 

Cutting-off Tools. 

Armstrong Bros Tool Co., Chicago. 
The Canadian Fai: mtrea] 

London Mach Tool Co . Hamilton 
Pratt 4 Whitney, Hartford. Conn 

I. 9 -•:..--> • i o At hoi, Mass. 

Damper Regulators. 

nadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Darling Bros . Lid., M "treat 
"taodard Engineering Co . Toronto. 

Dies. 

Armstrong Bros , Toronto 
Banflsld, W. H. 4 Son, Toronto 



Bllts, I \V Oo, Brooklyn, N V 

G .r.lncr. Kohl A ~on, Montreal 

M I'wist Drill and Machine Co , New 

Bedford 
Reed Mt On.. Brie l'a 

ni i to . S( Catharines. <>m 

Die Castings. 
Tallmar, Bran \ M< talCo , Hamilton 

Die Linkers. 

Garvin Machint Co Ni « ^ ork 

Die Manufacturers. 

Ernest Boott, Montreal 

Die Stocks. 

Curtis ft Ourtig Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co , Hespeler, Out. 

Dies, Self-opening. 

l.eome'rio Tool Co., New Have l, Conn. 

Dies, Opening. 

W II Ran field ft Sons. Toronto 
Jardine A B. & Co , Hespeler, Out. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co, Hartford Conn. 

Dies, Threading. 

Jardin-, A B., & Co., Hespeler, Out. 

Draft, Mechanical. 

W. H. BanHeld 4 Sons, Toronto. 
ButternVld ft Co . Rock Island, Que. 
A B. .linlineft.Cn Hespeler 
Pratt a tVhitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 
Sheldon s Limited, Gait. 

Dredging Machinery. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 

Drill Presses. 

Garvin Machine Co. New York 

Drilling Machinery. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Drilling Machines, Horizon- 
tal. 

John Bertram iSirn C).,Dian,Oi 
Kell gg - Co.. Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mil-tens Limited Mo treal 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drilling Machines, 
Locomotive. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
F ello/ & Co , Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
A. B. .lardine&Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Mussens Limited. M 'n real. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drilling Machines, 

Multiple Spindle. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Kellogs • I o , To onto 
I^ndon Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Musse s Limited Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Drilling Machines. Radial. Drills. Track. 



Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford. Conn. 
L. 8. Starrett Co.. Alhol. Mass 

Drills, Coal and Plaster. 

Canadian Kami Oo . Montreal 
Camming, ,1 \v . \v» Glasgow, N.8 

Drills, Electric. 

Holden Oo., Mom real 
Mnsset i LimttAii, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
United States Electrical Tool Co., Cin- 
cinnati 

Drills, High Speed. 

W in Abbott, .Montreal 

Hermann Kok r& Co., Montreal 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 

Cleve'and Twist Drill Co , Cleveland 

Ab xanderGibh Montreal. 

Mo se Tw'st D ill and Machine Co.. New 

B dford 
Mussens invted. Montreal. 
Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Drills. Hand. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Drills, Multiple Spindle 

Garvin Machine Oo. New York 

Drills, Oil Tuhe. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Mors" Twi-t Drill an IMachine Co., New 
Bedford 

Drills, Pneumatic. 

JolmF. Allen Co., New York 
C nadian R»- d C" . Montreal 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Too! Co., Chi- 
cago, New York 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drills, Portable Electric. 

Holden Co., Montreal 
United States Electrical Tool Co., Cin- 
cinnati. 



Drills, Ratchet. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co . Chicago. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co Cleveland 
A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespel- r 
The Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 
MorRe Twist Dtil aud Machine Co., Nev 

Be i ford 
Pratt & Whitney Co , Hartford, Conn. 

Drills, Rock. 

Canadian Rand Co.. Montreal. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Jeff reyMfg Co., Montreal. 

Drills, Sensitive. 

Eel o g & Co., Ter nto 
Mus-i ns Limited. Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York 



The Canadian Fairhanks Co.. Montreal 
Kellogir ft Co.,T rnnfo 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton. 
Mussens Limite Montreal. 
Niles-Bement Pond Co.. New Vnrk. 

Drilling Machines, Sensitive. 

H t; Barr, Worcester, Mass. 

Drilling Machines, Turret. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co. Dundas Ont 
London Mach Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drilling Machines, Upright. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
A B .lard ne ft Co., Hesp ler, Ont. 
Kellogg* Co.. To onto 
London Mach Tool Co., Hamilton. 

Mlis«r-n« Limited. Montreal 

R McDous-eli Co., Gait 

Drilling Posts. 

The Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo 

Drills, Bench. 

Ke log K ft c,'o.. Toronto 

London Mach Tool Co.. Hamilton. 

Pratt ,\j Whitney Co . Hartford Conn 

States Electrical Tool Oo . Oin 

Drills, Bit Stock. 

Cleveland Twist Dri'l Co., Cleveland 
Mors- Twist Dril and Machine Co , New 
Bt tford 

Drills, Blacksmith. 

Cleveland 1 wi»t Drill Co , Cle' eland 
A. B. Jardine ft Co., Heepeler, Ont. 
Kellogg & Oo . Toron'O 

London Ma'h Tool Co . Hamilton 
Morse T»i-t Drill and Machine Co., New 
Be ford 

Drills, Centre. 

Cl»vel»nd Tw'st Drill Oo., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
li-dford 



Clev land Tw stDri I Co , CI veland 
Morse I'wi t Drill and Machine Co. , Vew 
Bedft.r 



Drills, Twist. 



The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
H -riuann B >■ er ^ C... Moii re .1 
Cleveland Twi*t Drill Co.. Cleveland 
Alex. Gibb. Montreal. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co. 

New Kedford, Mass. 
M 8-ens Limited Montreal 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Drill Sockets. 

Morse Twist Drll a d Machine Co., New 
Be tl ford 

Dry Kiln Cars. 

Sheldons Limi ed. Gait 

Dry Kiln Equipment. 

Sheldons Limited, Gait 



Dump Cars. 



Rupert Q. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
The Canadian Fairbanks Oo., Montreal 
Fra> eis 'vde&Co. Montreal- 
Jeffrey Mfg Co . Mon r. al 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Dynamos. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 
Hall Engineering Works, Montreal. One. 
Lancashire Dynamo and MotorCo., Ltd , 

Toronto 
Packard Electric Co., St. Catharines. 
T. & H. Electric Co.. Hamilton. 
Vandeleur .v. Nichols, Toronto 

Electrical Supplies. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 



P ackard Electric Co., St. Catharines. 

T. ft H. Electric Co., Hamilton. 

Vandeleur ft Nichols, Toronto 
Elevators. 

Francis Hyde ft Co.. Montreal. 
Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 
Wa'ercut. Engine Wo k»Co.. Brantford. 
Whiiing Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey. Ill 

Elevator Buckets. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co , r rantf' rd. 

Emery and Emery Wheels. 

Ruperl Q. Bruce Oo , Ltd., T to 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd , Hamilton. 
Oarvin Machine Co., New Vm k 
Franci ■ Hyd- ft Co , Montreal 
St. vens. K. B., Detroit. Mich. 

Emery Stands. 

Ruperl O. Bruce Oo., Ltd . Toronto 

Fran is Hy e & Co., Mont real. 

Emery Wheel Dressers. 

Rupert G Bruce Co., I td., Toronto. 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd , Hamilton 
Gar ner. Root ft Son V'ontteai 
Francis Hyde ft Co . Montrt al. 

Engineers, Marine and Mech 
anical. 

Canadian General & Shre Ma ninety 
Co. Levis, Que 

Engines, Marine. 

John InglisCo , Ltd., Toronto 

The "switt Motoi Oar Co of Canada 

Ltd , Chatham 

Engineers' Supplies. 

Hall Engineering Works. Montreal. 

Engines, Gas and Gasolene. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co. , Montreal. 

Fielding 4 Pl.tt Ltd., Glou e.ter, Eng. 

Goldie 4 McOulloch Co., (ialt. Ont. 

Jones ft ilassco Montreal 

Fell i g ft Co Toronto 

The "Swift" Motor Car Co. of Canada, 

Ltd., Chatham 
Vandeleur ft Nichols, Toronto 

Engines, Steam. 

The Goldie ft McOulloch Co.. Gait, Ont. 

Robb Engineering Co., Amherst N. S. 

Sco ia Eng. Co., Montreal 

Sheldons I imittd, Gait. 

The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Equipment, Shop. 

Garvin Machine Co , New York 

Escutcheon Pins. 

Parm-nterft Bulloch Oo Ganannque 

Excavating Machinery. 

Jeffrey Mfg Co.. Montreal 

Exhaust Heads. 

The Canadian Fairhanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros Ltd. Montreal. 
Sheldons Limited, Gait. Ont. 
Standard En„i e>rin Co., Toronto. 

Fans, Electric. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamiltoo 
Matthews & Yates, Manchester Eng. 
shel tons Limited Gait. 'mt 
The Smart -Turner Machine Co.. Hamilton 

Feed Water Heaters. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

DarluiL B 08., Montreal 

George Green & Co., Keighley, Eng. 

o b Engtnee in »., Amh r>t N.S 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 
Stan. tard E gmeerit g , o . Tor o to. 
Waterous Engine W. ri.s Co., Brantford. 

Files. 

Nicholson File Co., Port Hope, Out. 
Bimnnds Mfg. Co., Fitchburg Mass. 

Flanges. 

Dart Union Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Forges. 

Fran is Hyde & Co.. Montreal 
Independen Pneumatic Tool Oo. 

Chicago, 111. 
W s Rockwell Co., New York 
Sheldons Limited. Gait, Ont. 

Forges, Oil Rivet. 

Franc ; s Hyde ft Co., Montreal. 
W s Ro-kwell Co., New York 

Forgings, Automobile. 

Canadian Billings & Spencer, Ltd., Wei- 
land. 



Forgings, Car. 



Canadian Billings & Spencer, Ltd., Wcl- 
lanil, 

Forgings, Drop. 

Bliss, E. W , O-v, BrooMyn N ▼ 

t an i. ban Billings k Spencer, Ltd., Wcl- 
land 

Forgings, Gasolene Engines. 

Canada Forge Co., Ltd , Welland 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



95 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



o6 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Forcings, Light & Heavy. 

Canadian Qaoaml I - Maohj Oe 

.J» 1 1 H.imillon 

Forgings, Dredge. 

« Hand 
Forgings, Locomotive. 

- 

tend. 

Forgings, Marine. 

H : .ii.l 

Forging Machinery. 

- 

K-ll . wito 

'. Y 

I Hamilton, <>nt 

• al Machinery Oo . Tiffin Ohio 

New Tork 

l i , Toronto 

Friction Clutches. 

Th- l Machine Co., Man 

Friction Clutch Pulleys, etc 

v HoOoTJoob Co. Gait 
.u* Engine Works Oo., Rrantford 

Frogs 

- \\ Steel Works. Montreal 

Furnaces, Steel Heating. 

>»r' 'nnn'fri"! Co . Tornnta 
Whitinc Poandry Eqoipm'n* ' Hai 

r-y '11 

Gane Planer Tools. 

Arirn'ronn Rros To~l Cn , Chicago 

Gas Blowers and Exhausters. 

Sh»'d~n» T : m iiM. "«lt 

Gas Producer Linings. 

Harhison-Walker Refractories Co . Pitts- 
burg 

Gas Producer Plants. 

Rain * Mil h»" Montreal 
The Canadian PUH mk»C Montreal 
pt.Mtnv * pii't L'd Gloucester Em. 
T ronto 

Ganpes. Standard. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co-. Montreal 

r]„ Tf Ln,i T»i« niHii rv«.. n»ioKn<i 

r*i t Drill aii'l Machine I 

R.o'fnr ' 

Pratt * Whitney Co . Hartford, Conn 

Gearing. 

ine Co . Haw York 

Gear-Cuttin? Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co . Montreal 

. Hew York 
K'lloee *<"n . Toronto 
London Marh Tool Co . Hamilton. 
M --» Tw lit Drill and Machine Co . New 

Re-lford 

rfHea Ttawwit Tllliil Co New York. 

"Whitney On Hnrtfor,\ Conn 
• antte, Si w Y'ork 

Gears. Angle. 

Gardner. Rob- . ft ton, Montreal 
Goldie * MeColloeh Co . C.alt, Ont 
Vfsfeetoai Bnaine Oo . Rrantford 

Gears, Cut. 

Ar 

Gardner Ro't * Son, Montreal 
ti Co . "alt, Ont 

' real 

New Process Paw Hide Co. rfyra~uae 



Gears, Mortise. 

RaMnar. RAhi , * Hon, Montreal 

no' I Calf. Ont. 

Johl " ' real 

New Prorea* Raw HHe Co. Syracuse 

Wateron Engine Works Co.. Rrantford 

Gears. Rawhide 

Gardner Ro»f * Son. Montreal 

rioi.' 

'• 
New ri 'M iaaa Raw Hide Oo ^yra rt u«e 
Wv«- .,. V- Oo., Rrantford 

Gears, Reverse. 

■•■ 

i 

Gears. Worm. 

Gardner Rohr . ft "on Montreal 
Join '• 

Generators. Electric. 

The Canad'an Fairbanks Co . Montreal 
Canadian Wl ' Hamilton 

Hall P.n«rin»»r'n* Work" Montreal 
I^ffinaaltire Djrnamo and M 

To- 

t II i 

Grates. Shaking and Dumping 

Standard F.ogineering Co., Toronto 

Graphite. 

■ 



John Mill, ii .". Bon, Montreal 
it, p l! , Detroit, Mich 

Grease Cups. 

Pet< rboro Lubrioatoi U i boro 

Grinders, Automatic Knife. 

r .inadian Hart Wheels Ltd , Hamilton 
w ll Banfleld ft Ron. Toronto. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brentford. 

Grinders, Bench. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd, Hamilton 
Kellogg ft Oo., Toronto 
Morse T»ist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Grinders, Bench. Electric. 

i i anal 

Grinders. Centre. 

Canadian Hart Wheels 1 td.. Hamilton 
Niles Rement-Pnnd Co . New York 
United States I I Oo Cincinnati 

Grinders, Cutter. 

U idem Tool Co , K.iie. Pa 

Pratf * Whitney Co . Hartford. Conn. 

Sohiiihar.lt .v. s -hntte. N. ■« York 

Grinders, Disc. 

Armstrong Rro« Co , Chicago 

Grinders, Drill. 

Oarrin Machine Oo . New Y'ork 

Grinders, Portable Electric, 
Hand. 

United states Klec. Tool Co., Cincinnati 

Grinders. Tool. 

Armstrong Rros. Tool Co.. Chicago 
Rlonnt. J a., ft r"o . Everett, Mass. 

Grinders. Pedestal. 

Canadian TWt Wheel, T.td., Hamilton 

Grinders. Tool Post 

Holden Oo . Montreal 

Grinders. Electric, Tool Post. 

I'miedStates Elee Tool Co. , Cincinnati 

Grinding Holders. 

Armstrong R*o«. T >ol Co.- Chicago 

Grinding Machines. 

The Canadian Fnirhanks. Montreal. 
Canadian Hs-f Who's TH Hamilton 

Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co. Toronto 

Oar'ner Pol.t .. * So-. Vn-treal 

Oarrin Vachine f^o., New Vork 

Indenendent Pneumatic Tool Co.. 
Chicago Til. 

Retlnc * Co IV-rnit" 

Modern T-.'l Oo., F.rK Pa 



Niles. Reme 



' York. 



Grinding Machines, Portable, 
Pneumatic 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Grinding and Polishing Ma 
chines. 

Gardner, Ro hr., ft Hon, Montreal 

Grinding Wheels. 

Rupert C, Prnce Co , Ltd . Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Cn , Montreal 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd Hamilton 
CarhoniT.ilnni Co.. Niagara Falls 

Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co., Toronto 

Mii'sens Limite ' Mo-treal. 

Hack Saw Frames. 

Mlissens Limited. Montreal. 

Si. Hon. 1- Hfg Co . Pltchbnrg, Ma 

Hammers, Belt Driven. 

Fran'is Hy.le ft Oo . Montreal 

Hammers, Drop. 

Rll-s. T. W . Co.. Rrooklyn. tC Y 
Canadian RillinK< t Spencer. Ltd., Wei 

Fr»nels Hyde k Co Mnn'real 

London Much Tool Co.. Hamilton, Out 

Nllee-Bement Pond Oo . New York. 

Hammers, Pneumatic 

Holden Oo!, Montreal 
independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chi 
catro 
Liu Band Oo . Montreal 

Hammers. Steam. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co. Dundas, Out 
Kellogg ft Co , Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton, Ont 
Kasarna Llml'ed. Montreal. 
Huas-Bemsnt-Pond Oo . New York. 

Hand Hoists & Trolleys. 

Whiti"g Tonndrjr Bqnlpmanl Oo., Hat 

rey. Ill 

Hangers. 

Fay, J. A . ft P«an Co . Cincinnati 

Oar.lncr. Bobl .k Son, Montreal 

The Oojdia * MoOuUoch Oo . fialt. 
Owen Round Iron Works Co , Owen 
Round 

I ..ley Work ■ I 

Oo . Hamilton 
Weteroua Engine Co , Brentford. 



Heating Apparatus. 

*/ Darling Bros . Ltd., Montreal 
MMattbewaft Yates, Manchester, Eng, 

Bfiheldons Limited, tialt. 

Hobbing Machine. 

Sclmrhardt ft Sohutte, New Y'ork 

Hoists, Electric and Pneu- 
matic. 

Advance Machine Works Ltd., Walter- 

mIIc. Ont. 
Northern Kng. Works. Detroit 

Hose, Air. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Canarlian Westinchnuse Co.. Hamilton, 
independent Pneumatic Tool Co. .Chicago 

Hose. Steam. 

Canadian Rand Co.. Montreal. 
Canadian Westfrtghouse Co., Hamilton. 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 
Chicago. Til. 

Hydraulic Accumulators. 

The Canadian Faii-hank» Co.. Montreal 

Vilcs.P,eme-t-Pond Co . New York 
ThoSmar' -Turner MnohineOo., Hamilton 

Hydraulic Machinery. 

The John Inglis Co., Ltd . Toronto 
Pieldin ft Pitt. Lfd Gloucester, Eng. 

Indicators. Speed. 

L R Starrett Co. Athol Ms- 
Schnclinr.it *.- Schntte, New Y'ork 

Index Centres. 

Oarrin **aohine Co . New York 

Insnecting Engineers. 

■Walter R T> ekworth Montreal 

Interlocking Plants and 
Sitmals 

Montreal Sfool Wo'ks. Montreal 

Intersections. Railway 

Mn,,tro»i steel Works, Montreal 

Iron Filler. 

fmnerial Waste ft Metal Co.. Montreal 

TackR. 

The Ca-iiadian Fairbanks Co .Montreal 
■p r no ;- rr v 'o k >"o Montro-l 
HftK f. ; fti,i... Ja-kCo w a t|.rvillc. Que. 
Montreal Stc] AVori-^. Moof-eal 
Norton, a .» roqticoov o,,o 

Jacks. Compressed Air. 

C "linn Rand Co . Montreal 

Jacks. Pit and Track 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Montreal °teel Tv.o. r "- a Montreal 

Jaws. Face Piste. 

Puohninr, Phnek fn. Hartfo-,1 Coon 
s !■" norton Machine Co, Windsor 
L el's. Conn 

Key Seaters. 

Can in *"aohine On . \.u Yorlt 

Lag Screw Gimlet Pointers. 

National Machinery Co , Tiffin. Ohio 

Lamns. Arc and Incandes- 
cent. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Weotintrbouse On.. Hamilton. 
The Packard Electric Co . St Catharines. 

Lathe Does. 

Armstrong Rros. Tool Co., Chicago 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford. Conn. 

Lathes Bench. 

Rl"unt J G. ft Co . Everett. Mass 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co. . Montreal 
Kellovg ft Co . Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co.. London. Ont. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Lathes. Engine. 

John Bertram ft Rons Co . Dnndas. Ont. 
The Canadian PalrbankaOo . Montreal 
Champion To-1 Work- On . Cincinnati, <> 

l..er. iiol.l * Son Montreal 

Oarrin Machine Co., New v... I, 

The Canadian Fairhanks Co., Montreal 

Kellogg ft Co . Toronto 

London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. Out. 

R M,I).iurallCo..Oalt 

Mussens Liini* ed Montreal. 

Now Haven Mfg (>. *"ow Ha-en. Conn 

Nilcs-Hement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Lathes. Screw Cutting. 

John Bertram & Rons Co., Dundas, < hit 
Kelloge * Co.. Toronto. 
London Mach. Tool Co , Hamilton, Ont. 
Mii=sens Limit'd Montreal. 
Hlles-Bement-Pnnd Oo New York. 
..-hardt ft Bchntte, New York 

Lathes. Speed. 

Kellogg ft Co , Toronto 

M Limi 1 ad, Montreal. 

Lathes. Spinning. 

Bliss E. VV , Co., Brooklyn. NY. 



Lathes, Turret. 



John Bertram ft SonBCo., Dundas, Ont. 
Blouut, J. G ft Co., Everett Mass. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Mussans Limited. Montreal. 
Nilee-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
The Prattft Whitney Co., Hartford, Oona 
Warner & Swasey Co., Cleveland, O. 

Link Belting. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 

Jones ft Glasrco. Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co.. Brantford 

Linoleum Mill Machinery. 

Bertrams Limited, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Locomotives, Air. 

Canadian Rand Co . Montreal. 

Locomotives, Electrical. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Locomotives, Industrial. 

Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 

Locomotives, Steam. 

Canadian Rand Co ., Montreal 

Lubricating Plumbago. 

Rupert. G Rruee Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hvde ft Cn. Montreal. 
John Milieu ft Son. Montreal 

Machine Divided Rules. 

Ti'fi-ln Pule Cn . Safinaw Mich. 

Machine Tool Attachments. 

The S. K. Hor»on Machine Co., Windsor 
f ccks. Conn 

Machinery Dealers. 

The Canadian Fnirhanks Co.. Montreal. 
Mn t "-ens T.tmitetl M' ntresl 
TbeSniart-TurneiMach'neCo .Hamilton 
Schnchardt ft S'hutte, New York 

Machinists' Scales. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
LnfMn R,, oPn. "agin«"-. Mich. 

Machinists' Small Tools. 

The Canadian RV-hanks Co.. Montreal 

Magnets, Lifting. 

Browninrr Engineering Co.. Cleyeland 
Pchuchardt & =chutte. New York 

Malleable Iron Furnaces. 

Franoi. H"do ft c. Montr» 1. 

S oo^srd Fnt»inoorjne Co T^rooto 

Milling Machines. Lincoln. 

I'n.-vin Machine Co . New York- 
Milling Machines, Double 
Face. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Milling Machines, Universal. 

I :.ir v ; n Machine Co., New York 
Sehnohardt ft "ehutte. New Vork 

Milling Machines, Worm. 

Garvin Macb'ne Co., New York 

Milling Machines, Plain. 

Cincinnati Milling Machine Co., Cin 

cinnati 
Kearney ft Treeker Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
JTellogy ft Co . T- ronto 
Kemnsm'rb Mf<". r o., Milwaukee, Wis. 
T.ondnn Mach Tool Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
Mnsseris Limited Montreal 
Niles-P.ement.-Pond Co.. New York. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Hartford. Conn. 

Bchuchardt k Schntte, New Y'ork 

Milling Machines, Profile. 

Rrowo ft SharneMfg Co .Providence. R.I 
John Rertram ft Rons Co., Dundas. Ont. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal. 
Garvin Machine Co.. New York 
Schuchardt ,v Rchutte. New York 

Milling Machines, Bench. 

Ke'lrtSC ft Co. .Toronto 

Schuchardt ft R.liulle, New York 

Mandrels. 

Rupert G. Vt-uce Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Dri" Co . Cleveland 
A. R .Ta'dine ft Co., Hesneler, Ont. 
John Milieu ft Son, Montreal 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Rod ford 
The Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford.Oonn 

Maple Cogs. 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Rrantford. 

Meters, Electrical. 

Canadian Westinghouse Oo.,Hamiton 

Vandelcnr .^ Nichols, Toronto 

Mill Machinery. 

The Gnldie ft McCnlloch Co.. Gait, Ont. 
Pobb Eneineerini. Co . Amherst, N.8. 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Milling Attachments. 

Brown ft Sharps Mfg Co., Providence, R.I 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 97 

The Steel Company 
of Canada, Limited 

An Amalgamation of tho following Companies : 

Canada Screw Co., Limited, : : ; : Hamilton 
Canada Bolt and Nut Co., Limited, : : Toronto 

The Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co., Limited, Montreal 
The Hamilton Steel & Iron Co., Limited, : Hamilton 
The Montreal Rolling Mills Co., : : : Montreal 



Producers of 



BAR IRON BAR STEEL 

R.R. Spikes Angle Bars Tie Plates Bolts 

and Nuts Plain, Twisted and Deformed Bars 

for Reinforcement of Concrete 

PIG IRON 

Foundry Basic Malleable 

WROUGHT PIPE 

Merchant Black and Galvanized 

Nails, Screws, Tacks, Rivets, Washers, Horseshoes, 

Wire and Wire Fencing 

Head Office Hamilton, Canada 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



98 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



John Ran ram * Boot Co , Dundaa. Ont. 
Cin-lunati Milling Machine ( 

einnati 
Kearney A Tr.vt.-r Oo . MiNaukes « n 
Kenipanr'ri li'g ( o . Mil«aukee, Wis 
Nile* Betnent Pond Oo . New York. 
**rett & Whitney. Martfor.t. Conn 

Milling Machines, HoriiontaJ 

Brown A Sharj e aflfe Oo . PlOl ideiu-e.R 1 
•is Oo . Dundaa, Ont 

•OHIO 

Kempenmh Mfg o. Milwaukee, Wis. 
I Hamilton, Ont. 
-eal 
Nile* I Oo . New York. 

Pratt £ Whitney. Hartford, Conn. 
BrOWB * -harpe V , iden 

Hertrani & Son Co , Dundaa 



Pans, Steel Shop. 

Cleveland Wire Boring Co . Cleveland 

Pap« 4 Mill Machinery. 

lb Limited. Edinburgh, Scotland 

Patent Solicitors. 

Cousins. C C . Montreal. 
Haubury A Hudden, Montreal. 
Fetlienitonhaugh 4 Co., Montreal ind 

Toronto 
Marion 4 Marion, Montreal. 
Ridout & May lice, Toronto. 

Patterns. 

.John Oarr, Hamilton, Ont. 
Halt Mull al.le Iron Co , Gait 
Hamilton I'atteni Works, Hamilton. 



Presses, Power. 



Reamers, Adjustable. 



Milling Machines, Universal Phosphor Bronze Castings. 



■ ati Milling Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati 
Kearney * Trecker Co . Milwaukee. Wis. 
On . Tor nto 
-•nith Mfg Co., Milwaukee. Wis. 
■: Mas'h Tool Co. Hamilton, Ont 
M<M~i.a l.imi'ed Monreal. 
Nilea Bement-Pond Co.. New Y'ork. 

Milling Machines, Vertical. 

Btown • Sharp- affg Oo . Providence.RI 
John Rertram 4 Sons Co.. Dundaa, Ont. 
Kearn j * I re. ker ' o. Milwaukee. Wis. 
Mach Tool Ob . Hamilton, Ont. 
Imltad, Montreal. 
Nile* Rement Pond Co . New Y'ork. 



Tallmiin Breast Metal Co., Hamilton 



Pig Iron. 



Milling Tools. 



Brownft8h«rp»Mfg Co . Providence, R.I 
Geometric Tool Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Ken nam't* Mfg o., Milwaukee Wia. 
Mach Tool Co , Hamilton, Ont. 
Mu sen- Limited Mon're 1. 
Pratt * Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Mine Cars and Hitchings. 

ndian Fairbanks Oo., Montreal 

Mining Machinery. 

The anadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Rand Co , Montreal. 
• real 
lohn Inglis Co , Ltd , Toronto 
Jeffrey Mfg , Co., Mon real 
T fcH EeotrioCo. Hamilton. 
Waternua Engine Works Co., Brantf rd 

Mortising Machines. 

Jones & Glassco, Montreal 

Motors, Electric. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Canadian Weatinghouse Co., Hamilton. 
Hall Erurineering Works. Mom real. 
Lancashire Dynamo and Motor Co , Ltd., 

Toronto 
The Packard Electric Co., St. Catharines. 
T 4 H Electric Co.. Hamilton. 
Yarideleur & Nichols, Toronto 

Motors, Air. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
II Ion Co., Montreal 
In.ie undent r ntumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Multiple Index Centres. 

■]» Cr. . V iw York 

Nail Sets. 

ratone Mfg Co., Buffalo, N Y. 

Nut Burring Machines. 

I [ffln, Ohio 

Nut Machines (Hot.) 

al Machinery Oo Tiffin. Ohio 

Nut Facing and Bolt Shav- 
ing Machines. 

.New York 
y Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Nut Tappers. 

Hertrani 4 Rons Co., Dundas. Ont 
York 
Hall. .1 Hi. Bon, Brentford, Ont. 
A R Jardine 4 Oo . Hespeler. 

Lot. ii.on. 

r> Co., Tiffin, Ohio. 

Oil Extractors. 

Darling Bros.. Ltd., Montreal 

Oil Furnaces. 

i 
Oil Separators. 

anadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Mtaodard Engineering Co., Toronto 

Oil Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels ' td , Hamilton. 
Oarbomndnm Co., Niagara Falls N Y 
Whi ing Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey III 

Pans, Lathe. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co , Cleveland 



The .Steel Co of Canada Ltd.; Hanrlton 
St-vens F. B. De roit. Mich. 

Pipe Cutting and Thread 
ing Machines. 

Butterfield 4 Co., Rock Island, Que. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Curtis 4 Curtis Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 
Joshua Heap & Co., Ashton-on-Lyne 

Eng 
A. R. Jardine 4 Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Mussens Limited Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
Williams Tool Co., Eiie, Pa. 

Pipe Screwing Machine. 

R. McDougallCo.. Ga!t 
Garvin Machine Co. , New York 

Pipe (Second Hand.) 

Imperial Waste and Metal Co.. Montreal 

Planer Drives, Electrical. 

Lancashire Dynamo and Motor Co., Ltd., 
Toronto 

Planer Jacks. 

Armstrong Tool Bros. Co. .Chicago 

Planers, Standard. 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Canada Machinery Corporation, Ltd., 

Gait, Ontario 
Gard er Root. 4 Son Montreal 
Garvin v achine Co., New Y'ork 
Kello g 4 Co., Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. Ont. 
Mussens imited, Montreal. 
New Haven Mfg Co.. New Haven, Cunn 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Pratt 4 Whitney Co., Hartford Conn. 
SJiucliardt 4 Sehutte, New Y'ork 

Planers, Rotary. 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
Kellogg 4 Co., Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Niles-Rement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Planing and Shaping Ma- 
chinery. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Pliers. 

Canadian Killings 4 Spencer, Ltd., Wei 

land. 
Bchuchardt ft Sehutte, New Y'ork 

Pneumatic Tools. 

Bliss, E. W., Co , Brooklyn, NY. 
Canadian Rand Co.. Montreal. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co. 

Chicago, New York 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 

Polishing Materials. 

Rupert <; Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Canadian Hart Wheel. Ltd , Hamilton 

Power Plant Equipments. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Mcntrca 
Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Goldie 4 Mi Culloch Co., Gait, Ont. 

art Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 
Standard Engineering C ..Toronto. 
Yandeleur .v Nichols, Toronto 
Watarous Engine Works Co., Rrantford 

Presses, Broaching. 

Bliss, E W., Co., Brooklyn, NY. 

Presses, Drop. 

W II Banfield 4 Son, Toronto 
E. W. Bliss Co , Brooklyn. NY 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Presses, Forging. 

Bliss, E. W . Co., Brooklyn, NY. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Cn , Montreal 
ft Foundry Co., Pitts- 
burg 

Presses, Hydraulic. 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Haon Tool Co.. Hamilton, Out. 

Nile" -Rement Pond Co.. New York 

I Engineering A Foundry Oo , Pitta- 

burg 



K. W. Bliss Co.. Brooklyn. NY. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Oo., Montreal 

Knllog. 4 i , Toronto 

London Mach Tool Oo , Hamilton. 

Niles-Rement-Pond Co., New York. 

Pressure Regulators. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Rros , Ltd., Montreal 

Protective Paint. 

; Jos Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey Oity 

Pulp Mill Machinery. 

Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 



Pulleys. 



The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Fay, J. A , 4 Egan Co., Oincinnai i 
The Goldie 4 McCulloch Co., Gait. 
Oneida Steel Pulley Co., Oneida, N.Y. 
Owen Sound Iron WorhB Co., Owen 

Sound 
Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Toronto 
Bchuchardt & Sehutte, New York 
The Smart-Turner Ma. Inn. ( (i >, , Hamilton 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Pump Governors. 

Darling Bros, Ltd. Montreal 
Standard Engineeiing Co.. To:otto. 

Pumping Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Genera 1 Supply Co of Canada, Ottawa. 
Goldie 4 McCulloch Co.. Gait, Ont. 
Hall Engineering Work- , Montreal, Que. 
The John Inglis Co , Ltd , Toronto 
Kellogg 4 Co. Toronto 
London Maoh. Too )0o., Hamilton, Ont. 
The Smart-Turner Mach. Co.. Hamilton 
Vandeleur 4 Nichols, Toronto 

Punches and Dies. 

W. H. Banfleld 4 Sons. Toronto. 
Bliss, E. W., Co , Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Gardner, Robt , 4 Son Monireal 
Globe Machine 4 Stamping Co. 
A. R. Jardine 4 Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
London Mach Tool Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
Pratt 4 Whitney Co., Hartford. Conn. 
Russell Machine Co., St. Catharines, On 
Bchuchardt 4 Sehutte, New Y'ork 

Punches, Power. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New Y'ork. 
Bchuchardt 4 Sehutte, New York 

Punches, Pneumatic. 

Jno. F. Allen Co., New York 

Punches, Turret. 

London Mach. Tool Co.. London, Ont. 

Punching Machines, 
Horizontal. 

Bertrams Limited, Edinburgh, Scotland 
John Bertram 4 «ons Co , DuudaB, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Quartering Machines. 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Much. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Rail Benders 

Holden Co., Montreal 
Montreal St el Works, Montreal 

Rail Braces 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Rails, Relaying. 

Imperial Waste ft Metal Co., Montreal 

Rails, Steel 

Montreal Steel Works. Montreal 



Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., Ne» 

Bedford 
Mum- ns Limited Montreal. 
Pratt 4 W bitney Co , Hartford. Coan. 
.Scliuehar.lt 4 Sehutte New York 



Reamers, Bridge. 



Butterfield 4 Oi . Roc'i Island, Que 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland 
Mo'se Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford 

Reamers, Expanding. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co , Ntw 
Bedford 

Reamers, High Speed 

Cleveland Twi"t Drill Oo , Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Reamer Fluting Machines. 

i ;.ir\ in Machine ( 'o., New Y'ork 

Reamers, Locomotive. 

Butterfield A Ox, Rock Island Que. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill C'V ( leveland 
Morse Twip t Drill and Machine Oj.. New 
Bedfo-d 

Reamers, Pipe. 

Butterfield 4 0., Rock Island. Qu°. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Reamers, Pneumatic 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Reamers, Self-feeding. 

Butterfield 4 Co , Rock Island, Que. 
< leveland Twist Dnl. Co., Clevel .i d 

Reamers, Steel Taper. 

Butterfield 4 Co., Rock Island. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co. Olevelan \ 
A. B. Jardine 4 Co., Hespeler, Out. 
Morse Twist Dr 11 and Machine Co.. New 

Bedford 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 
Pratt 4 Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Rheostats. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Canadian Weatinghouse Co.. Hamilton. 
Hall Engineering Works. Montreal, Que. 
T 4 H. Electric Co , Hamilton, 

Vandeleur 4 Nichols, Toronto 

Rivet Machines. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Rivets, Tubular and Bifur- 
cated. 

Parmenter 4 Bulloch Co., Gana-i que, 
Ont 

Riveters, Hydraulic. 

Jno. P. Allen Co., New York 

Riveters, Pneumatic. 

Jno. F. Allen Co., New Y'ork 
Bliss, E. W., Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co. 
Chicago. 111. 

Rolls, Bending. 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Roll Thread Machines. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Rotary Converters. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton 
Toronto and Hamilton Eleotric Co., 
Hamilton. 



Rammers, Bench and Floor Rubber Mill Machinery. 



Rupert G. Bruce Co . Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde 4 Co.. Montreal. 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 

Rapping Plates. 

Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde 4 Co. Montreal. 
Stevens, F.B., Detroit, Miob. 

Raw Hide Pinions. 

Gardner, Robt., 4 8"n, Montreal 
Mussens L'rni'ed, Montreal. 
John Milieu 4 Son, Montreal 
New Process Raw Hide Oo., Syracuse, 
N.Y. 

Reamers. 

Butterfield 4 Co., Rock Island. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
A. H. Jardine 4 Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford, Mass 
Pratt 4 Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 



Bertrams Limited. Edinburgh, Scotland 

Rubbing Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 

Rules. 

Lufkin Rule Co , Windsor, Ont. 

Saw Mill Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Fay, J. A , 4 Egan Oo., Cincinnati 
Gardner R lit.. 4 Son. Montreal 
Goldie 4 McCulloch Co. Gait. 
The John Inglis Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 
Mussens Limited, Montreal, 
Owan Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound 
Rnbb Fngin»erlng O '., Amherst, NS. 
Waterous Engine Works, Brantford 

Saw Filing Machines. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



99 



MONTREAL STEEL WORKS, limited 

P.O. Box 2369, MONTREAL 



Manufacturers of 

STEEL CASTINGS 

(Acid Open Hearth System) 

SWITCHES AND TRACK WORK 

for Steam and Electric Roads 

SPRINGS 

of all kinds 

MANGANESE STEEL CASTINGS 

for wearing Parts, insuring Great Hard- 
ness and Durability 

INTERLOCKING PLANTS 

TRUCKS FOR ELECTRIC CARS 




AGENTS FOR CANADA FOR 



Barrow Haematite Steel Go,, Barrow-in-Furness, England 



Quotations for Tee Rails, Fish Plates, etc., promptly furnished. 



Catalogues sent on application. 







f). 




Sheets and jilatfcs - a<ny width u}i to 50 inches , 

evny thickness u]i to one, inch . 
Merchant bars, sta^tinp and heavy jbrqinq dj all kinds. 

PIG IRON FOR FOUNDRY USE. 



UNSURPASSED 
EVAPORATION 

HIGHEST IN CARBON 




LOWEST IN ASH 
BEST ALL ROUND 
STEAM COAL. 



The Nova Scotia. Steel & Coal Company 

LIMITED. 1 ^ 

NEW GLASGOW, N.5. <Z> 



Don'* s ni> "^ mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



\ 



100 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Saws, Hack. 

■ ».1i»q Fairbanks Co . Montreal 
Diamond *aw and Stamping Works. 

Buffalo 
Garvin Machine Oo . New York 
Hermann Hoker A Co , Montieal 
K*llii»f * Oo . Toronto 
London Mach Tool Oo . Hamilton 
.1 ion Mi'.;i-i ft Bod, Montreal 
Ifflaa Bmilllll rnitfl New York 
L 8. Starrett Co . Athol. Maw 

Saws, Circular Metal. 

Btaeada Mfij Oo . ntohbar* M i 

Screw Machines, Automatic. 

London Mach Tool Co . Hamilton, Ont 

Mnuem Limited Montreal. 

Pratt * Whitney Co . Hartford. Conn 

Screw Machines, Hand. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co . Montreal 

Garvin Machine Co . Han York 

A B Jardine A Co , Hespeler 

London Mach Tool Co .Hamilton. Ont 

Musaen" I/mited. Montreal. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co .Hartford. Conn 

Warner A Swaiey Co.. Cleveland, O 

Screw Machines, Multip.e 
Spindle. 

Muwrm Limited. Montreal. 

Screw Plates. 

Butterfield ft Co., Rock IslaDd. Que 
AB .Tardme ft Oo ,rie*peler 
Mor*e Twist Drill and Machine Co.. New 
Bedford 

Screw Slotters. 

Carrin Machine Co . New York 
BimondaMfg Oow.Iltohbtng, Haas. 

Seamless Steel Tubing. 

John Millen ft Son. Montreal 

Second-Hand Machinery. 

Canada Forge Co . Welland 



8hafting. 



Canada Forge Co . Welland 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Far. .1. A . A Egan Co.. Olnel- natl 
Gardner R-ht A B-n . Mnntrea' 
The Onldle ft McCulloch Co . Calt. Ont 
Nllee-Bement-Pnnd Co.. New York. 
Owen Bound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound 
Positive Clutih ft Pulley Works. Toronto 
nt-TumerMacbineOo .Hamilton 
l'"ion Drawn Stec' Co .. Hamilton, Ont. 
Waterous Engine Co.. Brantford. 

Shanks, Straight and Taper. 

Jacobs Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn 

Shapers. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Can via Mvhlnery Corporation, Ltd.. 

Gait. ()n t 
The Canadian Falrhanks Oo. Montreal 
Gardner "nht . ft Son, Montreal 
Kellogg ft Co.. Toronto 
London Mach Tool Co . Hamilton, Ont 
NIles-Bemenf-PondCo . New York. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Hartford. Oonn. 
Jno Rte'to" Shap'r Co., Cincinnati. 
Union Drawn St*el Co.. Hamilton, Ont 

Sharpening Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd Hamilton 
Carborundum Co . viaeara Falls N'Y 

Shearing Machine, Bar 

John Bertram A Bon« Co., Dundas. Ont 
A B Janline ft ('o . Hesneler. 
I/rndon Mach Tool Oo . Hamilton. O 
Nllee-Bement-Pfnd Pin . New York 
Sobuchardl t Bchutf, Hen York 

Shears. Power. 

John Bertram A Son* Co . Dnndas. 
Blls.. P. W , Co , Brooklyn. NY 
National Machinery fo . Tiffin. Ohio 
Nlles-Bement-Pot.d Co NewVnrV 
Scbur-hardt &Hc),,utr.. Ne* York 

Shears. Pneumatic. 

John T Allen rv, . N.» York 

Sheet Metal Working Tools 

BIIm.E W Co . Breoklyn, N Y 
Kellogg* Co , Toron'o 

Shovels, Electric. 

Browning Engineering Co , Cleveland 

Shovels, Steam. 

Browning Engineering Co . Cleveland 

Holden Oo . Montreal 

8hoe Machinery. 

Canadian General ft Shoe Machy. Co., 
Levis. Qaa 

Side Tools. 

Armitrong Bros Tool Oo., Chicago 

Silver Lead. 

ndaor 
Fran Hyde fc Co , Montreal. 

Sleeves, Blacksmith's Drill. 

Keyatoot Mfg Co., Buffalo 



Sleeves, Taper Drill. 

K.-yst in' Mft; 00 . Buffalo 

Blotters. 

Cart in MachiiH' Co., New York 

New Haven Mfg Co., New Haven, Conn. 

Sockets. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Oo.. Cleveland 
Keystone Mfg Oo., Buffalo 
Morse Twist Drill and Maohine Co., New 
Bedford 

Solders. 

Tallman Bran ft HeteJ Oo., Hamilton 
Lumen Bearln Co. Toronto 

Special Machinery. 

Armstrong Bros., Toronto 
\V H. Banfleld A Sons, Toronto. 
Bewdon Machine ft Tool Co., Toronto 
John Bertram A Sons Co. Dundas, Ont. 
BHss.E W , Co , Brooklyn, N Y. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hart Whee'a Ltd., Hamilton. 
i ■ ii ■> in Maohine Co., New York 
Jardlne. A. B., A Oo . Hesneler. Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 
McKen7ie. D , Guelph. Ont. 
Russell Machine Co., St. Catharines. Ont 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Spike Machines. 

The Smart -Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 

Spring Coilers. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Springs, Coiled Wire. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland 

Springs, Machinery. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co.. Cleveland 

Stay Bolt Drilling Machines. 

Oarvin Machine Co., New York 

Steam Separators. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Darllne Bros., Ltd . Montreal. 

Pobh E"gin»erine Co.. Amherst N.S. 

Sheldon's Limited. Oalt. 

The Smart -Turner Machine Co. .Hamilton 

"tsndard Engineering Co , Toronto 

Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Steam Specialties. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal 
Sheldon's Limited. Oalt. 
Standard Enzlneerlng Co , Toronto 

Steam Traps. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Oarllne Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal 
Shcldons TJmlr«d. Cain 

Steel, Nickel Chrome. 

Schuchardt A Schutte. New York 

Steel Pressure Blowers. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Francis Hvd» ft Co. Montreal. 
Sheldon's Limited. Gait 

Steel, High Speed. 

Fdgar Al'en ft Co. Montreal 
Hermann Boker A Co.. Montreal 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Alex. Oibb. Montreal. 
Jessop. Wm , A Sons. Sheffield, Eng. 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 
Mussen* Limited. Montreal 

Steel Tubing, Seamless. 

John Millen A Son, Montreal 

Stocks. Pipe. 

Butterfield A Co.. Rock Island, Que. 

Stokers, Mechanical. 

"tandard Engineering Co Torrnto 

Straightening Machinery. 

Bertrams Limited, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Surface Grinders. 

Oarvin Va.-hinc Co . New York 

Switchboards. 

Canadian Weatinehouse Co.. Hamilton 
Hall Engineering Work". Montreal, Que. 
Toronto and Hamilton Electric Co., 

Ham'ton. 
Vandelenr ft Nichols, Toronto 

Switches Railway 

Montreal Steel Wr r ks. nfontreal 

Tanks, Steel. 

Ooldl" A McCulloch Co., Oalt, Ont, 

'i ipe Measures. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw Micr. 

Tap Wrenches. 

Butterfield ft Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Tapping Machines and 

Attachments 

John Bertram ft Sons Co . Dundas. Ont 
Garvin Machine Oo , New York 



The Geometric Tool Co., New Haven 
A. B Jardine ft Co., Hespeler. 
Kellogg A Co., Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
L. 8. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 



Taps, Adjustable. 



Geometric Tool Co, New Haven, Oonn. 

Taps and Dies. 

Butterfield ft Co., Rock Island, Que. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland 
A, B. Jardine A Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Morse Twi-t Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
Pratt A Whitney Co., Hartford, Oonn. 
L. 8. Starrett Co., Athol, MaBS. 

Testing Laboratories. 

Toronto Testing Laboratory, Toronto 

Tests and Inspections. 

Bain A Mitchell. Montreal 

Thread Cutting Tools. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Tiling, Opal Glass. 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing C\ , To- 
ronto. 

Time Recorders. 

W. A. Wood, Montreal 

Tire Upsetters or Shrinker 

A. B. Jardine A Co. Hespeler, Ont. 

Tool Holders. 

Armstrong Rros. Tool Co., Chicago. 
Cleveland Twist Dril' Co . Cleveland 
Keystone "fg. Co., Buffalo 
Pratt A Whitney Co., Hartford, Oonn. 

Tool Posts, Lathe. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago 

Tool Steel. 

He'mann Ro^erft Co.. Montreal 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
A'exsMer Oihb Montreal 
Wm. Jessop, Sons A Co., Toronto. 

Tools, Electrical. 

Holden Co., Montreal 
United c tates Electric Tool Co , Cin- 
cinnati. 

Tools. Lathe, Planer and 
Slotter. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co , Chicago 

Torches, Steel. 

Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Oo , Montreal. 
Stevens, F. B., Detroit. Mioh. 

Track Tools 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Transformers and 

Convertors 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Westingbouse Co . Hsra'Mon 
Hall Engineering Works. Montreal, Que 
T A H. Electric Co., Hamilton 
Vandelenr k Nichols, Toronto 

Transmission Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 

Ooldie ft McCulloch Co., Gait, Ont. 

Jones A Glassco Montreal 

Mussens Limited. Montreal. 

Positive Clutch ft Pulley WorkH. Toronto 

The Smart Turner Machine t"7> .Hamilton 

Waterous Engine Co.. Brantford. 

Trolley Wheels. 

Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton 
Lumen Bearing Co., Toronto 
John Millen A 8on, Montreal 

Trucks, Electric Car 

Montreal Steel Works, Montrea' 

Tubes, Boiler. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 

Tubes, Mechanical. 

John Millen ft Son, Montreal 

Tube Expanders (Rollers). 

Holden Oo., Montreal 

A. B. Jardine A Co , Hespeler. 

Turbines, Steam. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton 



Turnbucklec 

Canadian Billings ASpencer, Ltd., Wei 

land. 
Montreal Sttel Work* 

Turret Lathes. 

The Bullard Machine Tool Co., Bridge 

port, Oonn 
Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Mussens I imited, Montreal. 

Unions. 

Dart Union Co , Ltd. , Toronto 

Upsetting and 

Bending Machinery 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
A. B. Jardine A Co., Hespeler. 
Kellogg A Co.. Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin, O. 
Niles-Bement-Pona Co., New York. 

Valves, Back Pressure. 

Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Sheldon's Limited, Gait. 

Valves, Steam. 

Darling Bros, Montreal 

Standard Engineering Co , Toronto 

Valve Reseating Machines. 

Darling Bros.. Ltd., Montreal 

Ventilating Apparatus. 

Darling Bros. Ltd.. Montreal 
Matthews A Yates, Manchester, Eng 
Sheldon's Ltd., Gait 



Vises, Bench. 



Canadian Yeates-^ordon Co., Hamilton 

Prentiss Vi c e Co., New York 

Jas Smart Mfg. Co.. Brookville, Ont 

Vises, Pipe. 

Prentiss Vise Co., New York 

Vises. Planer and Shaper. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Vises, Milling Machine. 

Schuchardt A Schutte. New York 

Washer Machines. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio. 

Waste and Wipes. 

Imperial Waste & Metal Co., Montreal 

Watchmen's Clocks. 

W. A. Wood. Montreal 

Welding Compounds. 

Phillips-Laffitte Co., Philadelphia 

Welding Plates. 

Phillips-Laffitte Co., Philadelphia 

Wheelbarrows. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co.. Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyd" A Oo., Montreal. 

Window Wire Guards. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Erpnnded Metal and Fireprooflng Co. 

Toronto. 
B. Greening Wire Oo., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wire Chains. 

The B. Greening Wire Co.. Hamilton. 

Wire Cloth and Perforated 
Metals. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Erpanded Metal and Plreprooflr.g Co., 

Toronto. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton. Ont. 

Wire Guards and Railings. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
panded M 
Toronto. 



ir JL L 

Eipanded Metal and Fireprooflng Co.i 

Toronto. 
B. Greening Wire Oo. Hamilton, Ont. 

Wire Nails. 

Parmenter ft Bu'lock Oo..0ananoque 

Wire Nail Machinery. 

National Machinery Co., "* » i • 

Wire Rope. 

B. Greening Wire Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
John Millen A Son, Montreal 

Wood Boring Machines 
Pneumatic. 

Independent Pneumatlo Tool 0©., 
Ohicago. 111. 

Wood Boring Tools, Pneu- 
matic 

Holden Co., Montreal 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



101 



Wood Refuse Collecting 
Plant. 

Matthews & Yates, Manchester Eug 

Woodworking Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Fay, J. A., & Bgan Co., Oinoinnati 
Goldie & McOulIoch Co., Gait. 
WaterouB Engine Works Co. , Brantford 

Wrenches. 

Canadian Billings & Spencer, Ltd., Wel- 
land. 



Wrenches, Automobile Nar- 
row Jaw. 



Bemis & Call Hardware 
Springfield, Mass. 



and Tools 



John Millen & Son, Montreal 



Wrenches, Basin. 

Bemis & Call Hardware and Tool Co 
Springfield, MasB. 



Wrenches, Chain. 



Bemis & Call Hardware and Tool Co. 

Springfield, MaBS. 
General Supply Co of Canada, Ottawa. 



Wrenches, Monkey. 



Bemis & Call Hardware and Tool Co. 

Springfield, Mass. 
General Supply Co. of Canada, Ottawa. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 



Wrenches, Pipe. 



Bemis & Call Hardware and Tool Co , 
Springfield, Mass. 

General Supply Co. of Canada, Oltawa 
Retd Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 



Wrenches, Ratchet. 



Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo 




MODERN 



Bolt, Nut and Forging Machinery 
and National Wire Nail Machines 



|\b 



AT10NAL MACHINERY 

FFIN.OMIO.USA 



BOLT THREADERS, "WEDGE GRIP" BOLT and 

RIVET HEADERS. FORGING MACHINES, NUT MACHINES, 

ROLL THREAD MACHINES, Etc., Etc, 

Complete Catalogue *'E" upon request. 

The National Machinery Co., Tiffin, 0., U.8.A. 



Canadian Agents i H. W. PETRIE, Toronto, Ont. 



WILLIAMS & WILSON, Montreal, Quo. 




A New Manufacturing Machine Embodying 
the Constant Speed Drive 

No. 13B 

PLAIN MILLING MACHINE 

Longitudinal Feed, 14 in.; Transverse 
Feed, 6 in.; Vertical Adjustment, 12 in. 

Because it is of the constant speed drive type and is 
equipped with a friction clutch on the driving pulley, it 
can be driven direct |from the main line, and is readily 
adapted to a motor drive. 

It is rigidly constructed so that it will withstand 
the strain of heavy cuts. Note the design of the upright 
which supports the spindle head and also the heavy base 
and saddle. 

The levers and hand wheel controlling the move- 
ments are within easy reach of the operator. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAR WITH FULL DESCRIPTION. 



Brown C& Sharpe Manufacturing Co. 



Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



Montreal 



Selling Agents for Canada: THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., Limited 
Toronto St. John, N.B. Winnipeg Calgary 



Vancouver 



TWO CENTS PER WORD 

You can talk across the continent for two cents 
per word in a Canadian Machinery Want Ad. 



102 



CAN \IH \ N FO LJ X 1) R V M A N 



CANADIAN FOUNDRYMAN BUYERS' DIRECTORY 

To Our Readers— Use this directory when seeking to buy any foundry or pattern-shop equipment. 

You will often get information that will save you money. 
To Our Advertisers— Send in your name for insertion under the heading of the lines you make or sell. 
To Non-Advertisers — A nominal rate of $1 per line a year is charged non-advertisers. 



Alloys. 

Hermann Biker & Oo . Montreal 
Frsnc • Hyde ft Oo . Mori real. 

Barrels, Tumbling. 

Rupert Q Bruce Co . Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Oo . Windsor 

Francis Hy .e a Oo . Montreal. 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit. 
Sheld ns Limned Gait 
Whtln« Foundry Equipment Oo., Har- 
vey. Ill 

Blowers. 

Rupert G Brace Oo . Ltd., Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Oo , Montreal 
Detroit Foundry Supply Oo . Windsor 
Fran- • Hy.l- A On M n'rea' 
Matthew* ft Yates Manchester, Eng. 
n - B rwell Co.. New York 
Sheldon's limited. Qalt 

Blast Gauges- -Cupola. 

Rupert G Bruce Oo , Ltd . Toronto 
Fran i- Hyde s Co . Montreal. 
Stield ni», L tmted. i-e.li 

Brass Melting Furnace*. 

Rupert G Brace Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Francis Hy e & Co Moi.tr.-ar. 
W - Rockwell Co , New York 
Whi ing Kouud y Equipment Co., Har- 
vey ill 

Brushes, Foundry and Core. 

Rupert <; Bnici r o . Lid , Toronto 

ill Foundry Supply Co , Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Co., M.i 01 real. 
SteTeos. F. B. D.tr.it. Mich. 

Burners, Core Oven. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde a Oo. . Montreal, 
w S Rot hrell Oo., New York 

Cars, Core Oven. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
F ancis Hy le A Co., Montreal. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
rey.Ill. 

Cars, Foundry. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd , Torontl 

■hy Supply Oo., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A I o , Montreal. 

Shelnons Limited, Gait 
Whiting Fo tiid.y Equipment Co , Har- 
vey. LI. 

Charcoal. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 

■.dry Supply o., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co Montr ai. 
Stevens F B, , Detroit. Mich. 

Core Binders. 

Robeson Process Co, Au" Sables Forks, 
N V 

Core Box Machines. 

Francis Hyde A Co., Montreal 

Core Outting-off and Coning 
Machine. 

Ru]^: B. 1 . Toronte 

Francs Hyde A Co.. Montre 

Core Compounds. 

Rosen (, i i . Toronto 

1 ■ , Windsor 
Fran'i. Hyde A « o , Mud real 
SteTens. F B . Detroit. Mich. 

Core-Making Machines. 

Rupert Q I II ,ronto 

FiaDCia Hyde A i o . Montreal 
I ftilMis. F. B . Detroit, siich. 

Core Ovens. 

I! rp 

lry Supply Co . w 
Franc s Hy>.e A Co , .Montreal 
Sheldoos Limited, Gait 
Standard Engineering ' o . Tr ronto 
Sterns, r B . D. troit, Mloh. 
Whit ng Foundry Eqnrpmant Oo., Mar 
rey, HI 

Cranes, Electric and 
Hand Power. 

Adrsnoe Maohl Works. Walkeriillc 
Geo. Ander itreal 

Browr.. . ' , Cleveland, O 

Cana-llan Rand Oo . Montreal 
Gardner Rol/t Son Montreal 
V an It Hyde Oo M rireal. 
Mus-ens L'mited Mo treal 
Nilea-Bement-Pond Co , New York. 



Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co , Owen 

-ound 
Whitln Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 

rey, III 

Cranes, Hydraulic. 

Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
rey, 1,1. 

Crucibles. 

Rupert Q. Bruce Co., Ltd., Tor. nto 
B^. t ey, Jonatnau, Oru lole Co , Tren- 
ton N ,1 
Detroit Foundry Supply Oo , Windsor 
Joseph Dixon Orucibie Co., Jersey City 

F . n, is Hyde A ».,u , Montreal. 

Stevens. F. B, , Detroit, Mich. 

Cupolas. 

Adr.noe Maohlne Works WalkerviUe 
Rupert G Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
James Dougall A Sons, Ltd., Bonny- 

bridge, Scotland 
George Green A Co., Keighley, Eng. 
Franc s H > de A Co. M ntr- al. 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Scmtari Trust, 502 Eastern Townships 

Bank Building, Montreal 
Sheldons Limiteo, Gait. 
Wh ting Foundry Equipment Oo. Har 
rey, I1L 

Cupola Blast Gauges. 

Rupert G. Bruce Oo. Ltd., Toronto 
Fra cis Hyde A Co., Montreal. 
Sheldons Limited, Gait 

Cupola Blocks. 

Rupert G. Bruce r o., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Franei< Hyde A Co. Montreal. 
Northern Engineering Works Detroit 
Ontario Lime Association. Toronto 

Cupola Blowers. 

Rupert O. Bruce Co. Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Co., M ontrea 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Sheldon s Limit, d. Gait 

Cupola Liinings. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd., Toronto 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Framio Hyde A Co., Montreal. 
S evens, F B. Detroit, Mich. 

Cupola Twyers. 

Rupert G Bruit Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde A • o. , Montreal. 

Fans, Exhaust. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co . Ltd.. Tornto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A > o. Mnn real. 
Mitthivvs ft Yates, Manchester, Eng. 
Hheldons Limited, Gait. 

Fillers (Metallic.) 

Bhelton Metallic FiUei ro., Derby, Conn 
Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
«mootn-On Mfg. •., Jersey City, N.J. 
Stereos, F. B., Detroit Mirh. 

Fillets, Leather & Wooden 

l: [pert Bruce Oo., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde A Co. , Montreal. 

Fire Brick and Clay. 

Ruper' G Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
James Dougall A Suns Ltd., Bonny bridge, 

hind 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Fr i, l> Hyde A Co . Montreal 
Alexander Gibb, Montreal 
W K Marshall. 97 King W. Toronto 
Ontario Ijnie Arsor-iatiou Toronto 
Stevens, F B Detroit, Midi. 
United Fire Brick Co , Uniontown, Pa. 

Foundry Coke. 

I . Toronto 
Franr >■ Hyde A Co.. Moutrea 
Hterens. F. B , Detroit, Mich. 

Foundry Equipment. 

Rupt onto 

0« ■ , 

Fraiir-in Hy I A Co. Hiinlre* 
Northern Kngineeriug Works Detroit 
Bci 1 Townships 

Bank Building, Montreal 
Stereos, F b. Detroit, Htth. 



Whiting Foundry Equipment Co , H»r 
rey, 111. 

Foundry Parting. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Fruncis Hyde & Co., Monti eal. 

Foundry Facings. 

Rupert c Bruce Oo . Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co . Windsor 
Jos. Dixon Orucibie Co., Jersey ( n y 
Francis Hyoe A Co , Montreal. 
Stevens F K.. D -troit, Mich. 

Furnace Lining. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Francis Hyde & Co., Montreal 

Furnaces. 

Rupert G Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
A fred Fi»her, O i ago. 111 
Fr.nc s H de A Co. Montreal. 
The John Inglis Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Nor hem Engm. ering Works. Detroit 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 
St«»en-, F B . Detroit, Mth. 
Whit ng Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111 

Furnaces, Brass. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Franci Hy ie A Co. Mont el. 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 
Whiting i-oundry Equipment Co , Har- 
vey, 111. 

Hoisting and Conveying 

Machinery. 

Geo. Anderson A Co., Montreal 
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
Goldie A McCulloch Co , Gait, Ont. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co , Montreal 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
No.-*hern Engineering Works. Detroit 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 
Whit ng Foundry Equipment Co,, Har- 
vey, II . 

Hoists, Electric. 

Be»th W D . A Hon. Toronto 
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, m. 

Hoists, Pneumatic. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Indepenuent. Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago 
Mus°ens Limited, Montreal 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Iron Cements. 

Rupert G. Bruce r o., Ltd., Toronto 
Fram-i- Hyde a Co , Mont'eal. 
rmooth-On Mfg Co., Jersey City, N.J. 

Iron Filler. 

Rupert 0. Bruce Co.. Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Fra .cis Hyde Sto Montreal. . 

Montreal. 
Smooih-On Mfg. Co., Jersey City, N.J. 
Stevens, F B., Detroit, Mich. 

Ladles, Foundry. 

Rupert O. Brace Co., Ltd., Toronto 
F ancis Hyde . On Montreal. 
Northern engineering Works. Detroit 
Stevens F B. Detroit, Mich 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vfy, 111. 

Melting Pots. 

Rupert 0. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Franci ■ Hyde A Co., Montreal. 

Molders* Tools 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde A Co., Monirtal. 

Molding Machines. 

Bit Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Fra CB Hide a Co. Mout eal. 
On ario Wind Engine A Pump Co., 

Toronto 
Steven- F B. Detroit Mirh 
Tabor Mfg Co., Philadelphia 

Molding Sand. 

Unpen B, Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 



Francis Hyde & Ho.. Montreal. 
Stevens F. B Detroit, Mich. 

Oil Furnaces. 

Rupert G Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 

Pa turn Shop Equipment. 

ftuperl G Bruce Oo , Ltd., Toronto 
ray, .1 A. A Egan, Cincinnati 
Franci. Hyde & Co., Mon real 

Plumbago. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Fr.nc s Hyd AC., Montreal. 
St vena. F, B , D troit, Mich. 

Ramming Plates. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 

Riddles. 

Rupert G Brace Co , Ltd . Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Co., Montreal. 
Stevens F. B., D t oit, Mich. 

Sand Blast Machinery. 

Rupert G. B'uce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Co , Montreal. 

Sand Molding 

Rupert O. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Franci* Hyde A Co. Montreal, 
Stevens F. B , Detroit, Mloh. 

Sand Sifters. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Franris Hyde A Co , Montreal. 
-.(evens, F, B.. Detro t, Mich. 
Whitinir Foundry Equipment Oo. Har- 
vey, 111. 

Sieves. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Lo., Montreal. 

Snap Flasks. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde . Co., Montreal. 

Spruce Cutters. 

Bls« E W , Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde A Oo., »■ on real. 
St -vena, F. B., Detroit, Mioh. 

Talc. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Franeii Hyde A Co., Montreal. 

Track, Overhead. 

F ancis Hyde A Co.. Montreal. 
Whiting Foundry Equ.pmeut Co., Har 
vey, 111. 

Trolleys*. 

Peath, W. D , A Son. Toronto. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hand Co., Montr, al. 
Francis Hyde A Co., Montreal 
John Millen A Son, Montreal 
Northern Engine. ring Works Detroit 
WhitinK Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey I 1. 

Trucks, Dryer and Factory. 

Rupert Q Bruce Oo. Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde * u- ., Monfeal. 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Sheldon's Limited, Gait, Ont. 
Whitin< Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Turntables. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Oo., Windsor. 
Fr neiH Hyde A Co , M"ntreal. 
Northern Engineering Wo-ks, Detroit 
Stevens, F B. .Detroit Mj c h. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Wheels Polishing. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Wire Wheels. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



T03 





We are introducing a new line in 






GRINDING WHEELS: 




Dominion Abrasive Wheels 




These wheels are made by the 






vitrified process, recognized as 






the BEST in the world. We 






use the very best emery and 






artificial abrasives — combined 






with a special bond of our own. 

We produce a fast cutting 
wheel, which will not draw 
the temper of your tools and 
which we guarantee to be thor- 
oughly satisfactory. 

WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS. 

Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co. 

LIMITED 

New Toronto, Ont. 






FIRE 
BRICK 

for 

Cupolas* 



«i 



The standard Fire Clays by which all other 
Clays are judged are those of Pennsylvania. 

They're the ones from which our Cupola 
Brick are made. 

The cost per thousand means nothing un- 
less you know the results the Brick are 
giving. 

Write us for definite examples of how our 
material affects your melting costs. 



HARBISON- 
WALKER 
REFRACTORIES 
COMPANY, 

PITTSBURGH, 
PENNSYLVANIA 




GENERAL FOUNDRY MERCHANDISE 

ELECTRO-PLATING AND BUFFING SUPPLIES 



FOUNDRY SUPPLIES 

Canadian Plumbagos 

Heavy Bag Facings 

Charcoal Parting 

" Perfection " Parting 

Georgia Soapstone 

Scotch Core Oil 

Core Sand 

Moulding Sand 

Fira Brick 

" Clay 

Bull Dog Shovels 

Moulders' Riddles 

FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT 



Start the New Year Right — use Bruce's Canadian 
Plumbagos during 1911 and make more money. 




The Facing of Quality— BEAVER BRAND 



We carry large 
warehouse stock This 
means prompt service. 
May we send you a 
barrel of our plumba- 
go on trial ? If not 
satisfactory we will 
pay charges both 
ways. 

Ill 

Facing 
ire Brick 
oundry Supplies 
oundry Equipment 
Riddles. Shovels. Perfec- 
tion Parting. Canadian 
Plumbago. 

H. & G. Return Stove 
Plate. 

H. & G. Fire Proof 
Heavy Stove Plate. 



PLATING SUPPLIES 

Black Tripoli 

ideal White Finish 

Lustre Brass Finish 

Emery Cake 

Ground Pumice 

Nickel Salts 

Copper and Zinc 

Cyanide Potassium 

—SPECIALTY— 

We make a specialty 
of installing complete 
plating outfits. Esti- 
mates given on any- 
thing you require. 



Sole Agents. Hill & Griffiths Co. 



Sole Agents. Hanson. Van Winkle Co. 



RUPERT G. BRUCE COMPANY, Limited 

96-98 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario 



PHONE OCOO 
MAIN OUJO 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



104 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Daily Grind j 

The daily grind of mechanics engaged in using^,_J* 
abrasive wheels is made much more effective if 
their machines are fitted with 

CANADIAN HART CORUNDUM WHEELS 

Our wheels are free and fast cutting, porous, safe, 
and very durable. Send for our catalogue which 
describes the various processes used in making 
Canadian Hart Corundum and Emery Wheels. 






CANADIAN HART WHEELS, LIMITED 
Hamilton, .... Ontario 




ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



A 

Allen Co.. John F 75 

Allen, Kdg rA Co 14 

Ale nd-r En raving Co 79 

Anders n. Oeo.AO' 86 

Armstrong Broe. Tool Co 17 

Armstrong Broi 71 

B 

Bain A Mitchell 80 

Baird A West 87 

Baniield. W H . A Sons 68 

Bartlej Jonathan. O ucl» le Co 89 

Ba«s te Smelting A Mfg Co 84 

Bawdon achineand Tool Co 73 

Ke.m- I 0-11 H- dwar- A T. ol Co .... 73 

Berg Machinery Mfg. Co 26 

Bertram John, A Son*, outaide front cover 

Bliss. E. W.Co 75 

Blount.J O.Oo 19 

Rok-r rl'nutn A C (> 14 

Borden Canadian Co 71 

British Aluminium Co 70 

> riti-h C • alogue Register 83 

Brown. Eugene 80 

Brown A -.harpe Mfg. Co 101 

Browning Engineering Co 67 

Bruce Co . Ltd. . Rupert ( i 103 

Biidden. HanUlry A 80 

BuUard Ma- tdne Tool Co 9 

Butterlleld A Co 77 

c 

Canada Forge Co 18 

Canada Ma< -him ry Corporation 6 

Canada Metal Co 67 

.. Wire Goods Co 75 81 

Canadian Hillings t Spencer, Ltd It 

Sanedian Fairbanks Co 32 

anadian General A 8hoe Machinery Co IS 

Canadian Hart Wheels. Ltd 104 

Canadian RandCo 30 

Canadian Weetinghouse Oo 1 

Canadian Yeat'-s-Gordon Co 1 

Cexoonindum Co 77 

Carr, John 72 

Champion T ol Works Co 13 

Chapman Doable Ball Hearing Co.... 74 

Chicago flexible Shaft Co 13 

CHnolnnati MUllna Machine Oo 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co 95 

Cleveland Wire Spring Oo 71 

Curtis A Curtis Co 30 

Coahman Chuck Oo 72 

D 

Darling Broe., Lid 9 



Dart Union Oo 68 

Detroit Foundry Supply Oo 90 

Diamond Saw A Stamping Works. . 15 21 

Dixon, Joseph, Cruihle Co 70 

Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co 103 

Dominion Belting Co 71 

Dou^all A Son, Jas 87 

Duckworth-Boyer Engineering and In- 
spection Co 80 

Expanded Metal and Fireprooflng Oo. 66 

F 

Fay, J. A., A Egan Oo 12 

Fetherstonhaugh A Oo 80 

Fox Machine Co 25 

c 

Gait Malleable Iron Oo 81 

Gardner, Robt A Son 79 

Gartshore, John J 72 

Garvin Machine Oo 4 17 

Geometric Tool Oo 18 

Glbb. Alex 77 

Olohe Ma' hln» A Stamping Co 74 

Goldle A McOulloch Co 23 

Goodhue, J. 8. A Co 29 

Green A Co., Geo 88 

Greening, B., Wire Oo 81 

H 

Hall Engineering Works 80 

Hamilton, Wm 68 

Hamilton » at' em Works 72 

Harhinson-Walker Refractories Co 103 

H A E. Lifting Jack Co 79 

Heap, Joshua 75 

HoldenOo. The 10 

Horton Machine Co., 8. E 73 

Hyde, Francis, A Oo 91 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Oo 79 

IngUs, John, Co 23 

J 

Jacobs Mfg. Co 19 20 

.lardine, A. B., A Oo 68 

Jeffrey, H. 8 80 

Jeffrey Mfg. Oo 67 

Jeasop. Wm. . A Sons 70 

Johnson Machine Co., Carlyle 78 

Jones ft Glaaaoo 31 

Jones Safety Device Co 73 

K 

Kearney A Trecker Oo 6 

Kempemith Mfg. Oo 9 



Ker A Goodwin 72 

Keystone Mfg. Co 16 

L 

Lancashire Dynamo A Motor Co 29 

London Machine Tool Co 2 

LUkinRuleCo 83 

Lumen Bearing Oo 69 81 

Ml 

Magnolia Metal Co 27 

Matthews A Yates 2 

bicDougallOo , R Inside back cover 

McLaren, J. C, Belting Co 69 

Marion A Marion 80 

Millen A Son Ltd., John 24 

Modern Tool Co 6 

Montreal Steel Works Oo 99 

Morse TwiBt Drill and Machine Oo 93 

Morton Mfg Oo 8 

Morrow, John 66 

MunnACo 84 

Musaens Limited outside back cover 

N 

National Machinery Oo 101 

New Haven Mfg Oo 3 

New Process Raw Hide Co 20 

Nicholson File Co 76 

Niles-Bement-Pond inside front cover 

Northern Engineering Works 84 

Norton, A. O 79 

Nova Scotia Steel A Coal Co., Ltd.. 99 

o 

Oneida Steel Pulley Co 2 ) 

Ontario Lime Assrciat ion 88 

Ontario Wind Engine A Pump Co 89 

Owen Sound Iron Works 71 

P 

Parker Foundry Co 30 

Parks A Lelth 70 

Parment-r A Bullock Co 71 

Paxson, J. W., Co 80 

Peterboro Lubricator Mfg Co 26 

Phillips-Laffltte Oo 78 

Positive Clutch A Pulley Works 20 

Pratt A Letchworth .. 70 

Pratt A Whitney Co inside front cover 

Prentiss Vise Oo 78 

Pringle, R. E. T 10 

R 

Ridout A Maybee 80 

Robb Engineering Oo 22 

Robertson, J. M 80 

Robeson Process Oo 89 



Rockwell Co., W. S 78 

Rolaod, i has. F 74 

Rubs 11 »riti-Fricion Drill Chuck Co 17 19 

Russell Machine Co 68 

s 

Sadler A Haworth 28 

Schll. J.T 78 

School of Minin^ 80 

Schuchardt A Schutte 25 

Scotia Engineering Works 79 

Scott. Ernest 71 

Scrutari Trust 65 

Sheldons Limited 21 

Shelton Metallic Filler Co 85 

bimonds Canada Saw Co 66 

Slocomb Co , J. T 19 20 

Sly, W. W., Mfg. Co 88 

Smnrt-Turner Machine Oo 67 

Smiths Falls Mallealile Castings Co.... 66 

Smooth-On Mfg. Co . 84 

Standard Engineering Co 81 

Starrett, L. 8., Oo 18 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 97 

Steptoe, Jno, Shaper Oo 21 

Stevens. FredTicB 87 

Swift Motor Car Co 80 

Tabor Mfg Co, 86 

Tallman Brass and Metal Oo 74 

Technical Pub. Co 87 

Toledo Electric Welder Co 28 

Toronto and Hamilton Electric Oo 79 

Toronto Pattern Works 72 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Oo 84 

Toronto Testing Laboratory 69 

Trimont Mfg Co 11 

u 

Union Drawn Steel Co 79 

United Engineering and Foundry Co. 16 

United firebrick Co 87 

United States Electrical Tool Co 11 

V 

Van Dorn A Dutton Co 10 

w 

Warner A Swasey Oo 3 

Waterous Engine Works Co 22 

Whinton Machine Co., D. E 78 

Whiting Foundry Equipment Oo 86 

Williams Tool Co 8 

Winnipeg 74 

Wood Waste Distillers Co 80 73 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 






To Do Fast Good Work 

THIS NEW GAP LATHE IS IDEAL 




The extra strong gap gives absolute rigidity. This new lathe has extreme accuracy and speed. The 
carriage and apron will not spring under the most severe -train. The 'bed is specially braced and web- 
bed. The headstock construction prevents chattering. Ring oilers give perfect self lubrication. Quick 
acting locking device on the tailstock. Tailstock bolts adjusted from the top. Double back gears give 
eighteen distinct spindle speeds. Compound rest graduated to thousandths of an inch both ways. 
Spindle of high carbon hammered steel in solid chilled bearings. Friction safety feeds give quick 
changes of threads. Gears and racks cut from solid steel where necessary. Specially graduated 
dial on gear box. Full equipment, strength, accuracy,, solidity and wear. 

Headstock construclion prevents chattering-, and deep oil chambers fitted with ring- oilers make spindles and bearings 
self-oiling and always well lubricated. 

Tailstock of a special type, and sleeve is clamped by a quick acting locking device. Tailstock is secured to bed by bolts 
adjusted from the top where they are easily accessible. 

Bed, non-springing and webbed, and braced to secure rigidity. 

Gap, vibration absolutely prevented by use of brace supports to carriage. 

Spindle, high carbon hammered steel in solid chilled cast iron bearings, accurately fitted and self oiling. 

Carriage and Apron, non-springing under severest strain, full "V" bearings and flat bearings in addition on front ways. 

Double Back Gears give eighteen distinct spindle speeds, suiting lathe to work on widely different diameters. 

Compound Rest, with graduated base, accurately fitted taper gibs, end adjusted. Screws in both rest and cross slide 
read to thousandths. 

Friction, Safety Feeds, screw and rod feeds cannot be both engaged at the same time. Quick changes of \%, 2% 
and 5 times thread being cut. 

Gears and Racks, cut from solid and steel where necessary. 

Screw Cutting, full range of commercial threads provided for. 

Equipment, Compound rest, steady rest, follow rest, large and small face plates, wrenches, two speed, friction counter- 
shaft furnished with each lathe. 

Accuracy, Strength, Solidity, Wear. These are the paramount features behind all McDougall Machines. 

Made to meet extreme demands. 

.• 

Write for Particulars 

The R. McDougall Co., Limited 

GALT, ONT. 



Canadian Fairbanks Company, Sales Agents 



Cable Address : Dougalt, A. B.C. 5th edition 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Type O.T.r. 

One of the Most Powerful Gate 
Shears on the Market 

UNSURPASSABLE IN ITS CONSTRUCTION, WORKMANSHIP AND FINISH 

Will shear Iron Plates of five-eighths inch thickness by 10 feet in length and strip off to 
18 inches wide of unlimited length. We can also quote on any machine for the 

TIN AND SHEET IRON INDUSTRY 

MUSSENS LIMITED 

MONTREAL TORONTO COBALT WINNIPEG CALGARY VANCOUVER 

The advertiser would like to know where you saxv his advertisement — tell him. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX ON LAST PAGE 

CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

GnadianMachinery 

• Manufacturing News ~- r 

A monthly newspaper devoted to the manufacturing interests, covering in a practical manner the mechanical, power, foundry 
and allied fields. Published by The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, and London, Eng. 

TORONTO, 143-149 University Ave. WINNIPEG, 511 Union Bank Building. LONDON, ENG.. 88 Fleet Street, E C 



MONTREAL, Eastern Townships Bank Bldg. 



Vol. VII. 



Publication Office: Toronto, Februuary, 1911 



No. 2 




Locomotive 
Shop Machinery 











Bertram 100-inch Locomotive Driving Wheel Lathe — Motor Driven. 
PARTICULARS SENT ON REQUEST. 

The John Bertram C& Sons Co., Limited 

DUNDAS, ONTARIO, CANADA 

Agents: — The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd. Offices:— Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Saskatoon, Calgary, St. John. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



A PERFECT CYLINDER 

GROUND AUTOMATICALLY 



and exactly to size without any 
further attention than to place 
work in position, set sizing device 
to any desired size and throw in 
power. 

Work is first roughed down with 
coarse feed which automatically 
changes to a very fine feed to re- 
move the last thousandth and pro- 
duce the mirror finish. 

FEED AUTOMATICALLY 
STOPS AFTER GRINDING 
TO EXACT SIZE 




3^^ 



The P. £§9 W. Automatic Sizing Grinder 

WRITE FOR CATALOG "GRINDING MACHINES" 

FROM A SMALL PRECISION SCREW 
TO A LARGE ELEVATOR WORM 

There is no thread cutting 
operation, single or multiple, 
or hardly a gear cutting opera- 
tion that a 

P. & w. 

Thread 
Miller 

cannot do, and do faster, with 
greater accuracy, better finish 
and at a lower cost than any 
other thread cutting machine 
on the market. Built in six 
sizes. 

60 x 80 in. H. & W Thread Milling Machine. Especially for cutting LeaJ Screws. 

IT WILL BE WORTH YOUR TIME TO WRITE FOR CATALOG "THREAD MILLERS." 

Pratt C& Whitney Co. 

HARTFORD, CONN, U. S. A. 

Sales Agents -The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Limited 
Montreal, St. John Toronto Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 




*>.» 



'.4,-" 



7 he advertiser -would like to know where you saw fits advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




THE 

" B and C " 

Combination Wrench 

is a most useful tool which should 
find a place in every mechanic's kit ! 

It does the work of two ordinary 
wrenches, and will be found equally 
handy for nut or pipe work. 

Made of the very finest materials, 
head, bar and shank being a one- 
piece steel forging. 

Send for complete Catalogue 
of Wrenches. 

BEM1S & CALL HARDWARE 
AND TOOL COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS., 
U.S.A. 





_s* e YOST- 

Solid Jaw and Swivel Bottom Machinist's Vise 




A vise with a grip like grim death; a durability that defies time and 
the hardest usage. 

A vise that will give you a lifetime of perfect service and satisfac- 
tion. The metal in a Yost Vise is of faultless quality, perfectly distri- 
buted and the workmanship is 

Incomparably Good 

The Yost catalog would certainly interest you. Write us, asking 
for a copy. 

CANADIAN YEATES GORDON CO. 

HAMILTON ONTARIO 

This Guarantee Goes Willi Every Vise : We fully guarantee all of our Vises to 
be satisfactory in every particular and will promptly replace, without 
cost, any parts broken or badly worn when such failures are due to 
faulty material or construction. 




To properly drive machine tools so as to develop their 
greatest producing capacity, together with the greatest oper- 
ating economy, it is necessary to thoroughly study the 
characteristics of each tool, and to apply a motor 
exactly suited to its operation. 



Westinghouse 

Types 'S' and 'SA' 
Direct Current Motors 



Type "SA" Motor Driving a Slotter 



are designed and built especially 
for this kind of work. 



Type 'S' Motors are adapted for constant-speed service and for 
adjustable-speed service within moderate ratios, i to i£ and i to 2. 
Type 'SA' Motors have auxiliary commutating poles, and are adapted 
for speed ratios of 1 to 3 and 1 to 4. Circular 1068 gives full particulars 
concerning" both types. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co. 

Limited 

General Office and Works, HAMILTON, ONT. 

For Particulars Address Nearest Office 

TORONTO MONTREAL HALIFAX WINNIPEG 

Traders Bank Building 52 Victoria Square Telephone Bide. 158 Portage Avenue E. 




Type 'S' Motor ge 

Straightening Machine. 



CALGARY 

311 8th Avenue West 



VANCOUVER 

439 Pender Street 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANATIAN MACHINERY 



Important Announcement 




By special arrangement with the R. K. Le Blond Machine Tool Co., 
of Cincinnati, we are now enabled to offer for the first time in Canadian 
Machine Tool History, Lathes made in Canada from designs based on the 
wealth of experience afforded by the United States market, the greatest 
machine tool market in the world. 

By this arrangement we have obtained not alone the designs, but also the 
jigs and other fixtures which make for accuracy, interchangeability, and 
produce unequalled workmanship at a minimum of cost. 

The above Lathes represent the very last word in Lathe Construction. 
Powerful, yet accurate and easily handled -designed for getting the 
greatest amount of work with a minimum of expenditure of energy on the 
part of the operator. 

Details of construction will appear from time to time in our advertisements. 



London Machine Tool Co., Limited 

HAMILTON, CANADA 

Eastern Agents : Rudel-Yeates Machinery Co., 610 Canadian Express Building, Montreal, Que. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



FORMLNG TURRET LATHES 



For Brass 
Work 



SIZES 

Swing— 14, 16, 18, 20 inch. 

Capacity— Auto. Chuck 1, 1|, 
I2 inch. 

Hole in Spindle — lh 1 7-16, 
1 27-32 inch. 

Largest Diameter that can be 
formed— 2, 3, 4, 5 inch. 

TYPES 

Plain Head. 

Gea.red Friction Head, 

Automatic Chuck. 

Geared Power Feed for Turret 
Slide. 

Plain Turret Slide or Set-over 
Turret. 

Lei us send you full details. 
The 

WARNER & SWASEY CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents --- A. R. Williams 
Machinery Co.. Toronto. 
Williams & Wilson. Montreal : 

production in brass of Valve Bonnets, Oil 
forming, turning or threaded work coming 




Our Forming Turret Lathes have a wide range for the rapid 
Cups, Handles, Lubricator, Injector and Ejector parts, in fact any 
within the capacity of the machines. 




The conspicuous features of the 

NEW HAVEN LATHE 

that have made it the favorite machine in so many engineering shops are its 
ACCURACY, DURABILITY and RELIABILITY Purchasers of NEW HAVEN 
LATHES have our unconditional guarantee back of every Machine, and may 
rely on them absolutely. 

Write us to-day for detailed specifications and prices. 

New Haven Manufacturing Company, New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



GARVIN No. 21 

Plain Milling Machines 

PLAIN OR BACK-GEARED 




No. r 21 PLAIN MILLING MACHINE 



Universally used by Large Manufacturers 
in Batteries of SIX TO ONE OPERATOR, 
enabling them to produce a large amount of 
milling at the least possible cost. 

The machines are well built, sold at a 
moderate price and will take care of a great 
quantity of plain or gang milling for general 
manufacturing. They have a No. 10 B & S 
taper hole in spindle with draw-in-rod for 
arbor and are driven by a large wide face 
cone pulley. The table has a large oil pan 
all around. It is provided with screw feed, 
automatic trip and quick return by a large 
hand wheel which affords an easy, rapid 
movement. Adjustments 18 x 6 x 13 in. 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ] AS U TE R us%mI™ P 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
Send for Circular No. 153 

MANUFACTURED BY 



The Garvin Machine Co. 



Spring and Varick Streets 



years in NEW YORK CITY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Universal, Plain, Hand, Vertical, Lincoln, Duplex, Profile and Vertical Spindle Milling]IMachines ; Surface, Cutter 
and Tool Grinders; Die Slotters ; Screw Machines ; Monitor Lathes ; Automatic Chucks ; Screw Machine and Milling 
Machine Tools and Attachments; Automatic, Horizontal and Vertical Tapping Machines; Duplex Drill Lathes; Gang 
Drills- Hand Lathes; Screw Slotting Machines ; Spring Coiling Machines; and Special Automobile Machinery, Etc. 






The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



OUR 



Machine Tools 

ARE DESIGNED AND BUILT TO MEET THE MOST ADVANCED IDEAS 




ENGINE LATHE WITH QUICK-CHANGE GEARS. 

This machine has been designed for manufacturers who wish to get all 
the advantages of the newer types of high speed steel and to have 
a machine thoroughly modern in every respect and capable of turning 
out the best quality of work continuously and economically. 

Full specifications furnished on application. 

WE ALSO BUILD 

Engine Lathes, Break Lathes, Pit Lathes, Face Lathes, Shapers, Planers, 

Drop Hammers, Helve Hammers, Drilling Machines, Punch and 

Shears, Power Presses, Slotting Machines 

Canada Machinery Corporation, Limited 

GALT, ONTARIO 
Selling Agents: 

VANCOUVER— A. R. Williams Machinery Co.. Limited TORONTO— A. R. Williams Machinery Co . Limited 

W1NNIPEG-A R Williams Machinery Co., Limited ST. JOHN, N.B.— A R. Williams Machinery Co., Limited 

MONTREAL— Williams & Wilson 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery'' in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Bath No. 2 Universal Tool Room Grinder 

EQUIPMENT C. 

Adapted to all classes of grinding: 

Cylindrical, Surface, Disc, 
Internal and Cutter Grinding 

of all descriptions. The machine is 
equipped with power automatic 
cross feeds for cylindrical and sur- 
face grinding. The one machine that 
can be truly classed as a complete 
universal. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

BATH GRINDER CO., Fitchburg, Mass. 




Every Up-to-date Machine Shop should have a 




"MODERN" 

Universal Grinder 

Its many points of superiority over ordinary universal 
grinders are fully described in our illustrated catalog, a 
copy of which will be mailed to you 

Free on request. 

We would also be glad to place our experience at your 
disposal. 

This machine is more rigid and durable, and is better 
made than most grinders, and it produces more work 
and better work than any similar machine made. 

Among the many improvements incorporated in the 
Modern Universal Grinder is our new patented table 
hand wheel stop, which stops hand wheel while table 
is in motion, thereby eliminating the shock from the 
quick reverse of the hand wheel. 

Made in two sizes— Sold at interesting prices. It 
will be worth your while to write us before buying. 



MODERN TOOL CO., ERIE, PA., U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Cincinnati Cutter Grinder Improvements 

Taper Gib for Adjusting Slide 
More Substantial Stop Dogs With Fine Adjustment 

Stiffer Knee 

A FEW IMPORTANT FEATURES: 

KNEE SWINGS ABOUT COLUMN TO ANY ANGLE 

and table swivels about fixed centre on slide, bringing work 
into any desired position in relation to emery wheels. 

GRADUATED DIALS 

on all swivels and adjustments. 

A QUICK LEVER FEED 

for sharpening cutters and also a slow screw feed for other 
work. Use cup-shaped wheel for sharpening cutters. 

HAS MICROMETER ELEVATING DEVICE 

for setting cutters or reamers for desired clearance — and on 
this depends the successful working of these tools. 

SOME THINGS IT WILL DO 

It will sharpen all manner and shapes of cutters, reamers, etc. 
Will do internal cylindrical, surface, angular and face grinding. 

IT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY 

because it will sharpen cutters, reamers, etc., correctly, and 
quicker than any other similar tool. It is simple and conveni- 
ent to operate. Any boy can run it. 

Ask for Treatise Giving Details of Machine and its Operation. 

The Cincinnati Milling Machine Company 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agent H. W. PETRIE, Ltd., Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. 





THE MILWAUKEE 



No. 3B Universal Miller 

is one of a line of Plain and Universal Mill- 
ing Machines for heavy duty service having 
great weight and structural strength in com- 
parison with range. Powerful drive through 
single pulley as shown or at right-angles. 
Electric drive applied without difficulty at any 
time. All gears and bearings automatically 
flooded with oil. Every machine equipped 
with pump for cooling and lubricating the 
cutters and with means provided for return- 
ing the cutting lubricant to its reservoir. 
Wide table for jig work with ample bearings 
for maintained accuracy. Accurate screws 
with sensitive graduated adjustments — all 
adjusting and feed screws have ball thrust 
bearings. Dividing wheel double the size 
usually used— accuracy equal to the best. 
Let us send you more particulars. 

Kearney & Trecker Co. 

Manufacturers - Milwaukee, Wis. 

Agent* : 
The A. R. Williams Mach'y Co., Toronto 
Williams & Wilson - Montreal 



Don't foil to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Morton Draw-Cut Railroad Shaper 




This shaper will crown and plane 
axle boxes, plane the brass shell 
to fit, and plane shoes and wedges 
at a saving of from 25 to 40 per 
cent. over ordinary methods. This 
machine is also equipped fordo- 
ing a general line of shaper work. 

For further particulars address 

The Morton 
Manufacturing Company 

MUSKEGON HEIGHTS, MICH. 

Also builders of Cylinder Planers and a full line of 
Draw-Cut Pillar Shapers. 




Capacity 1 V 2 to 6 inch pipv ; Bolt* ''* to 2V; inch 



No. 3 Williams Pipe Machine 



Has every device for convenience, 
durability and speed. 

The Williams Pipe Machines are 
made in six sizes: %" to 2" ; ]/ 2 " 
to 3" ; 1" to 4"; lV 2 " to 6" ; 2" to 
8" and 3^" to 12". . 

Designed for strength and accur- 
acy, and unexcelled in efficien- 
cy, steady service and reasonable 
cost. 



Send for 
Description and Prices. 



WILLIAMS TOOL. CO 



Qox ie 



rn 



e.., U. S. A 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 







Broad, Continuous Bearing 
Surfaces give the 



K empsmit H universal 

MILLER 



that strength and 

rigidity which 
make|it§ good for the same heavy work as the similar 
size plain MILLER. See the full uninterrupted 
sweep of bearing of the universal swiveling block on 
the saddle, clamped rigidly to any position by ONE 
screw, conveniently located. Where a machine is to 
be used in a general line of work this point is a vital 
one. 

The KEMPSMITH MFG. COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Canadian Agents: Rudel-Yeates Machinery Co., Montreal 





THE MODERN 
DESCENDANT 
OF TWO GOOD 
MACHINES 

The Vertical Turret Lathe is the latest 

machine for multiplied saving- and output. 

It combines the good features of the Horizontal 
Turret Lathe and the Vertical Boring Mill. 

By vertical construction, chucking is made easy, 
and with both a main and a side head, the holding 
in instant readiness of a complete setting of tools is 
possible. 

Write for new treatise on 
Face Plate Work No. C15. 

It's free it shows how to "cut costs by cutting 
time between cuts." 

The 

Bullard Machine Tool Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



10 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



"Hard Service 



99 Electrically 
Operated 



Drills and Reamers 















^^^sB • 


■ 
• 1 




/ 


Type "D.' 







Economical 

Efficient 



Dependable 



Built in 6 sizes. Scope 0-2 inches. 

Your ultimate portable tools, if you 
want the GREATEST OUTPUT in 
THE LEAST TIME at the LOWEST 
COST. Others are doing it, why not 
you ? 

Write for Bulletin No. 20. 



Canadian Agent: 



R. E. T. PRINGLE, 



Eastern Townships Bank Building 



MONTREAL 



CANADA 



SOME of Our Specialties 

PNEUMATIC AND ELECTRIC TOOLS— "New Boyer" Riveters and Chippers, "Little Giant" Pneumatic Drills, 
Duntley Air Cooled Portable Electric Drills, Grinders, etc., manufactured by the Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company. 

AIR COMPRESSORS— "Franklin" Type, all styles and sizes. 
ANTI-RAIL CREEPERS— All types, absolutely prevent rails creeping. 
BUMPING POSTS— Tin- "Gibraltar" Structural Steel. 
RAIL BENDERS— Q. & C. "Samson." 

LOCOMOTIVE AND CAR REPLACERS— "Fewings" Cast Steel. 
COUPLER KNUCKLES— "Gilraan Brown" Emergency, 
JOURNAL BOXES— "McCord" Malleable Iron. 
PRIEST SNOW FLANGERS— Bring your trains in "On time." 
"AJAX" CAR VESTIBULE DIAPHRAGMS— Canvas, with steel reinforcement. 
PANTASOTE CURTAIN MATERIALS — \ny style, latest design. 

FREIGHT CAR DOOR FIXTURES Security Side and End Door. Dunham Side end End Door. 
STEEL BACK BRAKE SHOES— Locomotive, tender, passenger and freiginl car equipment. 
MONKBRIDGE STAYBOLT IRON— Best Yorkshire, stands all tests. 
McKIM GASKETS— Copper covered, asbestos and rubber filled. 

GRAY'S CHIMNEYLESS LONGTIME BURNERS— None equal, ask us for sample. 
FORSYTH BUFFING DEVICE— The high capacity shock absorbing device 
CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT STEEL— Maxwell "Deformed" Bar. 
H. R. RATCHET BRAKE LEVER — For all classes of equipment. 

If you would like catalogues or prices, write us, and we will forward same promptly and cheerfully on receipt 
of your request. 



42 York Street 
TORONTO, Ont. 



The Holden Company, Limited 



354 St. James Street 
MONTREAL, Que. 



29 H Portage Ave. 
WINNIPEG, Man. 



The advertiser would like to know where you sazv his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



11 



Made by 



A Mighty 
Trio 




Trimont Mfg. Co. 

Roxbury, Mass. 



Send for Catalog 
No. 200 



U. S. Electric Drills and Grinders 



Are saving time and labor in every shop they are in — for drilling in metal they are 
superior to any kind of portable drill, cost 50% less to run than air drills. Attach 
to any lamp, socket to operate. 




3-SIZES 
3/i6inch, W.G.T. 6 lbs. 
} inch, W.G.T. gibs. 
1 inch, W.G.T. 12 lbs. 



4-SIZES 
I - 1 - 1 J and 1 J inch. 



I inch— 2 SPEED 
Speed, 400-750 R. P. M. 




All motors wound for 110 or 220 volts. Direct or alternating current. 

Write for Catalogue. 



Portable Radial Drill 
Full Universal 
2-sizes, 7/8 and t\ inch. 



Montreal 



For sale by THE CANADIAN FARIBANKS CO., LTD. 

St. John, N.B. - Toronto - Winnipeg - Calgary - Vancouver 



The United States Electrical Tool Co. 



CINCINNATI, 



OHIO, U.S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "lo« adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



12 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



>wwwwyw^wv\\^^^^^v^^^^^^^ 



A Splendid Tool for the Pattern Shop 

Over 1,000 now in use— two-thirds of them were sold to Pattern Shops 




*AAA/V>AA/**V*VSAAAiV*V\AA' 



MARINE ENGINES 
and PUMPS. 

SHOE MACHINERY 
A Specialty 




This machine is designed es- 
pecially for the Pattern Shop. It 
accomplishes perfectly any work 
to which it may be applied in the 
Pattern Shop, such as Plane, sur- 
face, straight or tapering, joint, 
edgje, etc. 

Our No. 254 

Bench Hand 

Planer 

is not expensive — the price is 
within the reach of all— the Pattern 
Maker cannot afford to be without it. 

WRITE FOR LARGE 
ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR 

J. A. Fay C& 
Egan Co. 

362-382 West Front Street 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



BRASS and IRON 

CASTINGS. 

BOILERS and 

REPAIRS. 



That we have exceptional facilities at our disposal for the manufacture of all kinds of Machinery 
—in addition to our business as Brass and Iron Founders, General Contractors and Shoe Ma- 
chinery Engineers — has been amply proved this year. In the short space of five months' we built 
and installed all the Engines and Boilers of the new sister steamers "Levis" and "Lauzon," whose 
trial trips were a complete success. We make a specialty of all kinds of Marine Engine Work, 
and shall be glad to quote for first-rate products only. 

SHOE MACHINERY. Manufacturers of "Non-Royalty" Machines, Metallic and Good- 
year, "Fortuna" Skivers, and "Climax" Presses, Sand-papering, Lasting and Loose Studding 
Machines. 

Wire of every description for Slugger and Standard Screw Machines. 



The Canadian General & Shoe Machinery Company, Ltd, 



ERNEST CARON, Managing Director 

LEVIS, Quebec 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



m 



13 



First Aid to the Superintendent are these 

CHAMPION 
LATHES 




16" Quick Change and Double Back Gear Lathe 



If you have standing in his way 
equipment not up-to-date, you can't 
expect a big output of high-class 
work, can you ? 

When you do buy, give him the 
best, and the more so especially if you 
can purchase such tools at no greater 
cost than what should be paid for a 
first-grade article. 

Write for 

Our Catalogue of 

10-12.14.16 and 18-inch Lathes. 

And make a few of your own com- 
parisons of the capacities and conveni- 
ences to be found in these tools, the 
accuracy of which can hardly be ques- 
tioned. 

Quick Change or New Standard, 
with or without Double Back Gear, 
Taper or other Attachments, 



CHAMPION TOOL WORKS COMPANY 



Station B 



H- 



CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



■H 



A High-Grade Small Engine Lathe at Moderate Cost! 




Rudel-Yeates Machinery Co., Montreal 

Canadian Agents 



You can use one in YOUR shop. 

The only reason 
why we can sell 
you a machine 
so good as this 
at the moderate 
price we quote 
is because w e 
make them in 
large lots by the 
most approved 
methods known. 

WRITE 

our Canadian 
Agents for 
Descriptive Cir- 
cular and 
PRICE 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



14 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



DIE BLOCKS 



CRUCIBLE OR OPEN 
HEARTH STEEL 



Canada Forge Co., Limited, 



Wetland, Ontario 



Buy an ALLEN BSSffig RIVETER 
and be sure of the fastest and 
tightest riveting at the lowest cost 

Send for our unequalled " Records." They will interest you. 
Special riveters designed to meet all requirements. 

"WHATEVER THE RIVETING. THERE'S AN ALLEN FOR THE JOB." 

JOHN F. ALLEN COMPANY 

Est. 1872 

370-372 Gerard Avenue, NEW YORK 

AGENTS —Canadian Rand Drill Co., Toronto, Halifax, Montreal. Liebert and W.U. Codes, "Riveter." 





HigK Speed Steel Has a Solid Foundation 
In a Name TKat Means Something 

Cutting speed attained on cast iron : Roughing; cut, 140 ft. per minute — finishing cut, 210 ft. 
per minute. 

In NOVO SUPERIOR you secure a materially increased speed over the high speed steels now in 
use, the highest quality, greatest toughness, longest life (3 times that of any other) and exceptional 
ability to cut very hard materials. The cutting edge retains its sharpness from 3 to 4 times longer 
than other high speed steels. Hardens in oil, air or water, and is now carried in stock in our ware- 
house in all current sizes, flat, squares and rounds ; annealed and unannealed. 

SEND US A TRIAL ORDER AND CONVINCE YOURSELF 

HERMANN BOttER CD. COMPANY 

332 ST. JAMES ST.. MONTREAL 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



1.5 



ALLEN'S 



MANGANESE STEEL- 



NON ■ MAGNETIC 



TRAMWAY POINTS and CROSSINGS .--This Crossing was 




Makers EDGAR ALLEN & CO L T P Imperial Steel Works. SHEF. 



Edgar Allen & Co., 



Limited 



Manufacturers of 



TRAMWAY POINTS and CROSSINGS 

Tramway Passing Places, Junctions, 
Depot Sidings, Lay Outs 

Supplied complete with all Fittings ready for 

laying on the road. 



OVER 20 YEARS' EXPERIENCE 



Sole makers of 



ALLEN'S 




MANGANESE STEEL 



Manager for Canada— THOMAS HAMPTON 



330 ST. JAMES STREET 



MONTREAL 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 






16 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Prelected r> Pnienis 



HEAP'S 



High Speed BOLT and 
PIPE THREADING 
Machines are made in 
all sizes with Single and Multiple Heads. 

Our New Patent Die Head is the most simple and the 
only mechanical Die Head on the market. 
The dies are not operated by springs with their attendant 
troubles. 

Before placing your orders enquire closely into our claims. 
Send for Catalogues 

Joshua Heap & Co.. Limited 

Ashton-under-Lyne, England 

Canadian Agents : PEACOCK BROS., Montreal 



Save Time and Power 

You need more than lifting capacity in your hoists. The speed of lift and the pull necessary are vital 
points in shop economy. In both these points no other hoist made equals the 

"CYCLONE" 

HIGH SPEED CHAIN HOIST 

The two-ton "Cyclone", for instance, overhauls only 39£ feet of chain, with a pull of 125 His., to raise 
two tons one foot. 

This unequalled efficiency of the "Cyclone" is due chiefly to its unique "internal yoke" gearing and its 
self-luhricating graphite bronze bushings. 

Write for our Catalogue — it describes the "Cyclone" fully. 

JOHN MILLEN <& SON, LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



Address all correspondence to 321 St, James Street, Montreal 




"S-T-E-R-L-I-N-G" 

HACK - SAW - MACHINES 

Have Proved Their Superiority By Actual Test 



"Sterling Hack Saw Blades" in a "Sterling 
Machine" will save you time and money, 
giving results which cannot be obtained 
from any other machine. 

" Handled by First-class Jobbers." 



Manufactured by 



Diamond Saw and Stamping Works 



Buffalo, N. Y., U. S. A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



17 




The Machine that does it. 



Riveting by Lightning 

NO RIVETS USED. 

You have heard of lightning melting a piece of 
metal. 

That is what's done in a Spot Welder — only the 
lightning is tamed and harnessed. So tame that you 
can't feel it (only three to five volts), and harnessed 
to a machine that a boy or girl can operate with abso- 
lute safety. And FAST — well you have heard of 
"greased" lightning. That's the brand. 

One "Spot" will weld two pieces of No. 18 gauge 
sheet steel together tighter than two rivets. The 
same machine will weld No. 10 gauge or No. 28 gauge 
equally as well. 

Spot Welded — so called because the small point 
in the metal the size of a rivet is melted — fused to- 
gether at the spot where the copper dies touch the 
metal. 

No holes to punch — no rivets to use — no projec- 
tions to raise — no time wasted. 

Our new catalog tells about spot and butt welders, 
and its yours for the asking. 

No Lease. No Royalty. No License. 

The"Toledo" Electric Welder Co. 

CUMINSVILLE, CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



NEW METHOD OF WELDING 

Keep Your Scrap Heap Corner Empty 

Have your broken castings repaired. 
Do not lose time waiting for {new 
castings. They can be repaired by 
welding the cracks and broken parts 
by the autogenous welding process 
and made as good as new. 

Blow holes in rough or machined castings of any 
metal filled up. Holes drilled by mistake filled 
up. Broken or cracked gasoline engines and 
automobile cylinders welded. Broken or cracked 
pulleys, gear wheels, etc , welded. Flanges 
welded on pipes. Metal added on parts worn out 
by friction. Teeth renewed on broken gear 
wheels. Tanks made absolutely water or oil 
tight. Cutting steel or wrought iron of any thick- 
ness and in any position. Cracks and corrosions 
in boilers a specialty. 



Plants supplied for doing the work. 

All welding and cutting work undertaken. 

Let us send you full particulars. 




3=^ 



R. J. LEVY, 

St. Monique Street 



Manufacturer 
and Welding 



of Oxygen 
Specialist. 

MONTREAL, 



QUE. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



18 



I \NADIAN MACHINERY 






IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THE CUTTING OF 
TAPER SCREW THREADS OF ANY KIND OR SIZE 

THE GEOMETRIC TAPER THREADING DIE HEADS applied to the 

turret of your Screw Machine or Turret Lathe will give you accuracy 

and large production at a very low cost of installation. 




Better than a special machine, for it leaves you the Screw 
Machine for other work when not cutting tapers. 

Write to-day for particulars, and tell us your requirements. 

The Geometric Tool Company 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents: Williams & Wilson, Montreal, Quebec; A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 





ARE THE STANDARD 
OR ACCURACY, WORKMANSHIP, DESIGN AND FINISH 

Improved Levels for Testing Shafting, Etc. 




In addition to the regular parallel vial, the bases have a cross level which enables one to place or hold the base 
on a shaft level in its cross section, not canted sidewise : for the shape of a level glass is such that, though true as 
adjusted on a flat surface, it will not be reliable when canted sidewise. Hence the value of the cross level, not only 
to test the truth ol shafting, but other surfaces which tend to throw the level base into a canting position. 

The base of this level has our improved concave running through the length of its base, leaving a flat margin 

each side, which improves its seat for flat work, while forming an absolutely true and reliable seat for shafting, etc., 

than a V groove. Made in 6, 8, 12 and 18 in. sizes, with plain vials and with plain and graduated vials. 

Send for free Catalogue, No. 173, of Fine Mechanical Tools. 



THE L S. STARRETT CO., ATHOL, K 



MASS., 
.A. 




1 he advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. ' 



J 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



19 




High-Speed Steam-Hydraulic Forging Presses 

Double your production with one-half your labor cost and steam consumption. Cost of 
repairs reduced Eliminates heavy shocks and vibration. 

"SINGLE LEVER CONTROL" 

Small sizes single-frame type. Large sizes four-column type. 

Built for doing all classes of forging, shearing or pressing. 

100 Tons to 12,000 Tons Capacity 
UNITED ENGINEERING & FOUNDRY CO. 

2305 Farmers Bank Building, PITTSBURG, PA 

EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS FOR UNITED STATES. CANADA AND MEXICO. 
Manufactured under Davy Bros.. Ltd., Patents. 



A Machine Wrenches 

/t\ Drop Forged Turnbuckles screw Drivers 

/ JD\ Pliers 

Structural 

Wrenches 
Track " 

Eye Bolts 
Lathe Dogs 
Etc. 




ALL KINDS OF SPECIAL DROP FORGINGS 
Send Models o Blue Pints fo Estimates. 



Canadian Billings & Spencer, Limited Welland, Ont. 





All Kinds 

All Sizes 

3-8 in. to 8 in. 

POINTS OF EXCELLENCE 

Uniformity of design. 

Tool steel set screws with 
our improved beveled point 
which prevents upsetting. 



ARMSTRONG 

DROP FORGED STEEL 

LATHE DOGS 





Have Armstrong Quality 



Best Obtainable in Design, 
Workmanship and 
Material 



DOG 



No draft left on the inside, 

thus insuring a good true 

bearing and a bite that Write for Special Circular 

won't slip. and Discounts. 



HEAVY DUTY ^ yOU Want tne BEST 

Specify 
ARMSTRONG 
Drop Forged Dogs 




Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., 



"The Tool 106 N. FRANCISCO AVE. 
Holder People" CHICAGO, U S. A. 




Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



20 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Utility 



The HIGH DEGREE OF UTILITY in the JACOBS IM- 
PROVED DRILL CHUCK is so great and universally 
recognized that competitors have become almost unknown 
to us. 

The fact that we have, in the seven years we have been in 
business, sold more than 90,000 Jacobs Improved Drill Chucks, is 
the most positive proof of the recognized HIGH DEGREE OF 
UTILITY in the JACOBS IMPROVED DRILL CHUCK. On 
each of these CHUCKS is printed: "THE JACOBS MFG. CO.,— 
HARTFORD, CONN., U.S.A.— PATENTED SEPT. 16, 1902." 



The Jacobs Manufacturing Co., Hartford, Conn., U.S.A. 




Engineers and Mill Owners 

"LOOK UP" not the cost of your 

BABBITT METAL 

but the cost of your many shut-downs caused by the use of 
inferior Babbitt Metal. Use THE CANADA METAL CO.'S 
METAL and stop that needless expense. 

Office, 31 William Street, - - Toronto 



Holds Straight 
Shank Drills 

Without Slipping ! 



This is only one of the features that 
recommends the 



Anti- 
Friction 




Drill Chuck 




the chuck with 
the grip 
that positivel 
will not slip 



The "RUSSELL" is adjusted 
with a simple turn of the wrist, 
no hammer, no spanner and no 
wrench required. Roller bearings 
eliminate friction, 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 
Distributing Agents in Canada 

The General Supply Company 
of Canada, Limited 

Ottawa, - - Canada. 

Made by 

Russell Anti-Friction Drill Chuck Co.. 

Elmira. N. Y. 



emu 



You want it 


in your shop! 




A most efficient and 
satisfactory tool, 
which should hnd a 
place in your shop, is 






t ■ 


1 


BLOUNT'S 




Wet Tool Grinder 


] | 


i 

It is very economica 
to run and can be run 
continuously if de- 
sired. This grinder is 
fitted with self-oiling 
bearings, and there is 
no wear of parts, be- 
cause the propeller of 
the pump, furnishing a 
a constant supply of 
water, is loosely fitted, a 
the nearest point. A sle 
out the use of packing. 


^^^^^ 


i 
i 

■J 






nd does not touch the case at 
;ve cap prevents leakage with- 




SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 




Send for further cfe tall*. 




J. G. Blount Company 

EVERETT, MASS., U S.A. 





The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



21 




Tin Can 
Machinery 





Bliss Patented No. 12N Bodv Making and Soldering Machine 

OUR machines give greatest production with most 
economical tin and solder consumption. We furnish 
complete equipments for making Open Top and 
Packers' Cans for fruits, vegetables, fish, meats, soups, 
condensed milk, etc., also for paint and varnish cans, 
baking powder and spice cans, lard pails, butter tins, tin 
boxes and packages of every description — round, square, 
oval and oblong. Send samples, state requirements. See 
what we can do for you. 

On Request Can Machinery Catalog 14G 

E. IV. BLISS COMPANY 

20 Adams St. - - BROOKLYN. N.Y. 

London Office---114 Queen Victoria St.. London. E. C, England. 




A handy combination tool 

that every mechanic should have in his kit is the 

"KEYSTONE" 
Reversible Ratchet No. 200 

Consists of 

Ratchet for Taper Shank Twist Drills 

Sleeve for Square Shank Drills 

Short Boiler Socket for Square Shank Drills 
(Sockets Interchangeable) 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOG. 

THE KEYSTONE MFG. CO. 

Buffalo, IM.Y., U.S.A. 



Files that Cut 
Clean and Fast 



are the only files worth 
having. And there are no 
files that give equal satis- 
faction in this respect to 
these well-known., Nichol- 
son-made Brands. 




American 

Arcade 

Great Western 

Globe 

Eagle 

Mc Lei Ian 

K.dcF. 
J. B. Smith 

The steel used in these 
files is made especially 
for us from a formula 
evolved during the many 
long years' experience as 
specialists in the manufac- 
ture of files. 



Nicholson File Co. 

(Dominion Works) 
PORT HOPE - ONTARIO 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



22 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Do Not Be Misled by Inferior Imitations. 




There is but one 



1 PRENTISS 



VISE 

Made by 

Prentiss Vise Company 

Hardware Building, 106110 Lafayette St., Cor. Walker St., NEW YORK 

Canadian A«ent«: A. McFaMand & Co.. Coristine Bldg., Montreal 




Rockwell 

Muffle Hardening 

Furnace 



For hardening all small articles which require perfect 
unitormity and freedom from oxidation or scale. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG No 26 

W. S. ROCKWELL COMPANY 



Hudson Terminal Bldjj., 



50 Church St.. NEW YORK 



(The OriK-nal Furnace Rockwell). 



H & E PATENT BALL BEARING LIFTING 
JACKS 

for Railway Work, Contractors' 
and Builders' Use 




These Jacks are built of the best 
tirades of malleable ircn and steel, 
and for speed, convenience or 
durability are unequalled. 

Made in plan and foot lift 
styles, fully guaranteed. 

Manufactured by 




H & E Lifting Jack Company 

WATER VILLE, QUE. 

^GS Stock carried by F.H. HOPKINS &. CO. 



Montreal 




The Whiton 

AUTOMATIC 

Gear Cutting 
Machine 



Do you want Catalog ? 

The D. E. Whiton 

Machine Co. 

NEW LONDON, • CONN. 



- Cut Gears - 

•Theoretically Correct- 
RAWHIDE OR METAL 



Robert Gardner &SonIl d 

/JcgaretfAt^ AlONTI^EAL 



The Alexander Engraving Co. 

Half-tone Cuts and Zinc Etchings 
Designing & Drawing. 

We are producing the very highest 
quality of machinery cuts from re- 
touched photos and wash drawings. 
We want your next order. 
Write Us, Phone Us or Call 

352 ADELAIDE ST. WEST, TORONTO. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell hint. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



23 




AIR TOOLS 

ARE SUPREME 

MECHANICALLY 
AND ECONOMICALLY. 

They are easily superior to all others in power, tag^y-aMe of h " i . dI *55 

economy of air consumption and general tfflciency 1HOR TOOLS are simple 

in construction; they run without vibration an. i little attention and repans are 

neoessaiy. ADOPTED AS THE STANDARD IN THE PRINCIPAL 

PLANTS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. 

- SENT ON THIRTY DAYS. TRIAL-express charges paid both ways if 

unsatiif ctory WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE MATTER. 

.^»\in,lo infif'tv different sizes covering every possible Air Tool requirement. 

F?c^,,s le Cai i id in A« enta G W ' PETRIE, LTD.,131 Front St. W., Toronto 

Cor. atjSSSXSlSSSn. Antoine St... Montreal; 422 Abbot St., Vancouver. 



INDEPENDENT PNEUMATIC TOOL CO. 

CHICAGO NEW YORK PITTSBURG SAN FRANCISCO 



NORTON JACKS 

Standard on the Leading Railroads 
Made in Canada. 
Stock carried for immediate shipment. 

Manufactured only by 

A. 0. NORTON, 

G0ATIC00K, 
Prov. QUEBEC. 



STOCK CARRIED BY 
MUSSF.NS MMI T Er>, - Montreal and Winnipeg 





PATENT 

Shaft Straightening 

MACHINE 

For use on the Lathe. 

NO HAMMERING 

For round or 
square Bars, 
Cranks, Tubes. 
Etc. 

Write for Lists to 

W. COPLEY & SON 

Machine Tool Makers 

HALIFAX - ENGLAND 



YOU NEED MORE LIGHT 

IN YOUR FACTORY WRITE 

TORONTO & MAIVIIL.TOIVJ 
ELECTRIC OO. 

MANUFACTURERS OK 

Dynamos 

for Light and Power 
I . AND ALL 

Electrical Apparatus 




Union Drawn Steel Co., Lid, 



Hamilton, 



Ontario 




Manufacturers of 



Bright Finished Steel Shafting and Shapes 



Large Stock of all Sizes. 



Send for Price List, 




24 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Noise makes 
work harder. 



Silence 
f Jmakes workmen 

^un WORK HARDER j 




SILENCE 



There's a lot of difference in v ork in that little 
diffe.ence in words. 

Isn't more work a real good reason for substituting 
New Process Noiseless Pinions for the metal pinions 
that make your motor drives noisy? 

The noiseless pinion is the crowning detail of 
positive drive, and New Process rawhide makes up into 
pinions that are interchangeable with metal pinions in 
all points of efficiency where high speed and constant 
duty are involved. 

New Process Noiseless Pinions by abolishing noise 
enable the operator to keep plugging away without 
falling behind his machine's capacity. 

Write for our booklet. 

fNEW>ROCESS IS TO ALL OTHER IffT RAWHIDE AS STEELlS TO IRON 

leNEwPROCESs^pfl J|Raw Hide Co. 

OFFICE 6 WORKS ^^(rfr'^r SYRACUSE. N.Y. 



Old- Fashioned Cast Iron Pulleys 

are becoming scarce in the most modern shops. 

There's a better, more economical way, to 
transmit power. 

Decreased power loss means increased profit 

for you. 

"ONEIDA" 
Steel Pulleys are 
the lightest in the 
world consistent 
with strength. 

They transmit 
the same amount of 
power with one- 
quarter to one-third 
the weight of cast 
iron pulleys. 

Compare the cost of your cast iron pulleys per 
year with the cost of "ONEIDA" Steel Pulleys. 
You'll be surprised. 

Oneida Steel Pulley Co. 

Oneida, N.Y. 




Why Buy Wood Pulleys When You Can Save Money By Purchasing 



ft 



POSITIVE" COMBINATION PULLEYS? 



Waterproof 
Wood Rims 

Pressed Steel 
Arms 

Malleable Hubs 




Will transmit 
more power 

and consume 
less power 

than any other 
pulley 



EVERY PULLEY GUARANTEED. 
Prompt shipments from stock. Write us for the opinions of users. 

The Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Limited 



11-13 Jarvis Street 



TORONTO, ONT. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



25 



"ATLAS" 

Chain Blocks 1 

The Atlas is the Fastest, 

Strongest and most 

Durable 



Worm Gear Chain Block on 
the market. It is made of steel 
and wrought iron and has 
proved its lasting qualities in 
thousands of the world's lead- 
ing machine shops. In shops 
and warehouses where quick 
handling of pieces is an im- 
portant factor of the day's 
work Atlas Blocks will pay for 
themselves in a shorter time 
than any other block. 

Always in stock. 
Send for Catalog 



SCHUCHARDT & SCHUTTE 



307 Coristine Building, MONTREAL 



New York 
Stockholm 



London Shanghai Berlin Vienna 

St. Petersburg Copenhagen Budapest 



One QYCLONE HEAVY PATTERN 

BELT BLOWER 

is designed and constructed to give a A MAXIMUM 
OUTPUT when taking A MINIMUM POWER, and is 

of the highest class 

BRITISH 
MANUFACTURE 

suitable for: 

Induced Draft 

Smiths' Fires 

Refuse Collection 

etc., etc. 




Prices Low 



ASK OUR AGENTS FOR CATALOGUE No. 128 

Matthews £& Yates, Limited 

SW1NTON, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

AGENTS FOR CANADA: 

BAIN & MITCHELL, Y.M.C.A. Building, Monlreal. 

ANGLO-AMERICAN SUPPLY CO., Limited, 311 Kodtrion Building, Wlnoipei. 





^ Bhk 


Burn 
Cheap 
jk Fuel 




^^HfOva^SHflfc JUL!. J*^ 


With the Sheldon Mechani- 
.£. cal Induced Draft System 
you can cut the cost of fuel 
in half, by utilizing a cheap- 
er grade, or can secure bet- 
Wm ter and almost smokeless 
combustion from the same 
grade of fuel that you are 
now using. 




---■■~ .,_- . _ 


Send for Catalogue 
No. 14 


SI1ELDONS LIMITED 


» - GALT, ONTARIO 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 




STEAM PLANTS and 

ACCESSORIES 

Waterous Steam Plant and Engine Room equip- 
ment is well known throughout Canada We 
have the facilities for turning out the best work. 
Careful and continuous inspection during manu- 
facture ensures perfection of the finished product. 

Our List Comprises : 

BOILERS 

FEED WATER HEATERS 

INJECTORS 

STEAM SEPARATORS 

CIRCULATING PUMPS 

FEED PUMPS 

EXHAUST HEADS 

WATER PURIFIERS 

BACK PRESSURE VALVES 

We carry a large stock of Steam Plant Accessor- 
ies always on hand. Have you seen our new 
Boiler List? 

THE 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Ltd. 

CATALOGUES ^ BRANTFORD CANADA 





BOILERS 

Of All Kinds For All Purposes 

With our modern and splendidly equipped boiler shops we 
are in a position to turn out the highest . 
grade on the shortest notice. 

Ask us for prices and information on anything relating to power. 

The Goldie & McCulloch Co., Limited 

Gait, - Ontario, - Canada 



WESTERN BRANCH 
248McI)ermott Ave., Winnipeg, Man. 



QUEBEC AGENTS 
Ross & Greig, Montreal, Que. 



B.C. AGENTS 
Robt. Hamilton & Co.. Vancouver. B.C. 



\VF MAKE Wheelock Engines, Corliai Engines, Ideal Engines, Gas Engines and Producers, Piston Valve Saw Mill Engines, Boilers, 
Heatero. Tanks, Steam and Power Pumps. Condensers. Flour Mill Machinery, Oatmeal Mill Machinery, Wood Working 
Machinery. Transmitting and Elevating Machinery, Safes, Vaults and Vault Doors. 

ASK FOR CATALOGUES, PRICES AND ALL INFORMATION 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



27 



THE JOHN INCUS COMPANY, Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



If you are requiring Feed Water Heaters, 
Condensers, Steel Storage and Mixing 
Tanks, send us your inquiries. Experience 
counts, and we have had fifty years' ex- 
perience in Boiler and Engine manufac- 
turing and to-day our products are the 
standard. 

14 STRACHAN AVENUE, TORONTO, CANADA 



Robb Corliss Endines 




Robb Engineering Co. 



AMHERST, N.S. 



LIMITED 



Have the Armstrong-Corliss valve gear, 
which will operate at a higher speed 
than the ordinary releasing gear. 

This valve gear does not depend on 
springs or dash pots for closing, and 
runs without noise. 

The wearing parts of the valve gear are 
enclosed in a casing and run in oil so 
that friction is reduced to a minimum. 



DISTRICT OFFICES: 

Canadian Express Building, Montreal R. W. Robb, Manager 

Traders Bank Building, Toronto - Wm. McKay, 

Union Bank Building, Winnipeg " W. F. Porter, 

Grain Exchange Building, Calgary ' J. F. Porter, 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



28 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



SAVES 

335% «o 50% 

over any 
other 

System 

of 

Lubricat/ng 




The only automatic 
grease cup on the market 
in which compressed air is 
the feeding force is the 

"PHILADELPHIA 

Grease Cup 

and because compressed air is used, the pres- 
sure is always uniform to the last drop of 
grease! 

The "Philadelphia" is equally positive in 

action in whatever position 

placed, and it is not affected 

by centrifugal force when 

used on loose pulleys, etc. 

The " Philadelphia " 
saves time and labor, re- 
quires no attention, in- 
creases efficiency, de- 
creases expense, and is 
absolutely dust-proof. 

Has been thoroughly 
"tried out" and invari- 
ably returned a "winner." 

WRITE FOR PRICE LISTS 
AND DISCOUNTS 

Peterborough 

Lubricator 

Mfg. Co., 

Limited 

Peterborough 
Ontario. 




More Power at Less Cost ! 

Here's a proposi- 
tion to diminish 
working costs that 
must surely appeal 
to YOU ! 

Will you investi- 
gate the merits of 

WEBSTER 

Feedwater Heater, 
Purifier and Filter? 

It makes use of 
a 1 1 con lensations 
and waste steam, 
and will positively 
rid your boiler of 
scale 'by removing 
a 1 1 scale-forming 
elements from your feedwater. Using pure water 
means getting every ounce of power out of your 
boiler with a smaller amount of fuel. 

Our descriptive literature has many points of 
interest for you ! Send for it TO-DAY. 

DARLING BROS., LIMITED 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 

Vancouver, B.C., Frank Darling, Apent 




1 



THE 

LANCASHIRE 
DYNAMO AND 
MOTOR CO., Ltd. 


152-4 Bay Street, Toronto 




Motors and 
Generators 

for 

all purposes 











The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



29 



METALLIC PACKING 



Drpjrtinrnl i-f Cnrnmrrtr nnfi tabor 



October 19, 1910. 

apnolid Metal Company. 
113-11^ Bank Street. 

New York City, H.Y. 
Jentlemen: 

Before entering this Service I waa employed by the 
3 uget Sound Tug Boat Co. of Seattle, Wash, aa Chief Engineer of 
their Ocean Tug "7ATO0SH" , this veeeel being equipped with a 
triple expansion engine 16" 24' * 40" by 2ft" stroke, with all 
jleton rode and valve stems packed with the "Metal ic Packings." 
At first we ueed ae> "pecking metal" a hard fi,ne grained babbitt 
composition sold on the Pacific f^oast under the name of "Packinr 
Metal" the soft rinrie being cast, and machined In the shop, then 
scraped to place by hand when installing. The life of these rln. 
was only about 30 days and gave considerable trouble by leaking 
-nest of that time, so that eventually I connected the l/8" vent 
pipes to the condenser. 

Being short of a set for installation at one time I cast 
a set on mandril and plaster of parts moulds, using Magnolia 
Metal, with such good results that I at once fitted all rods in 
a similar manner, the soft rings not being machined or scraped 
to place in either application, they ran for four months under 
my care without trouble, and I *-ave since been informed that 
they were taken out two years after I left t v e vessel, worn out. 

U.S. Local Inspector of soi'iere, Tuneau, Alaska. 




The low coefficient oi friction and antifrictional and wear- 
ing qualities that have made Magnolia Metal the greatest 
of all Babbitt Metals for lining bearings, makes it equally 
valuable as a Metallic Packing. If you have not heretofore 
thought of Magnolia Metal in that connection we trust 
that you will not fail to do so in future. 

SOLD BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE OR BY 

MAGNOLIA METAL CO. 

225 St. Ambroise St., Montreal 
New York - - - Chicago 



Special Offer 



PRACTICAL ENGINEER POCKET BOOK, contain- 
ing 680 pages, treating on over 2000 Engineering and 
Mechanical subjects brought up to date. We offer this 
valuable reference work at the very low price of 40c, 
postage prepaid. Address Montreal Office 




You Can Adjust This Clutch to Carry Any Load 

thus eliminating all liability of overstrain or breakage of the 
machine operated. In the past eight years 




U/>e BERG 



f BALANCED FRICTION CLUTCH PULLEY 

, oTq n -,' jV \ To} has been used with the utmost satisfaction on 

over a thousand machines of various kinds. 

It can be started as gradually as desired. 
Frictions are made of fibre— not wood, and 
the pulley is brass bushed. 

We guarantee each clutch to carry its 
rated capacity with ease. 



it will pay you to investigate this clutch 
as it Is a trouble-killer and power-saver 
wherever It Is Installed. Write for cir- 
cular and prices. 



The Berg Machinery Mfg. Co. 




MMMaHBCWMNk.. 



Limited 



Bathurst and Niagara Sts. 



Toronto, Ont. 



We make Castings. Engines, Boilers. Tanks, and Sheet Metal Work of all kinds. 
Mining and Brick Machinery. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



30 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 







Goodhue Belts 

_ 












All belts stretch, and the continual cutting out and wasting these short lengths 
of belting is a very heavy expense ! Why not minimize this expense by using 

Goodhue Belts 

the belts which stretch less by 15 to 25 per cent, than any others? All unstretched 
parts are excluded in making up these belts, and the greatest care is given to the 
selection and stretching of each section. "Goodhue" Belts have just the right 
amount of 'cling' on the pulley, and the price at which they sell, combined with 
the satisfactory and lengthy service they give, make "Goodhue" Belts the 
CHEAPEST ON THE MARKET. 

According to the conditions under which the belt has to run we recommend : 
"EXTRA," "STANDARD" or "ACME WATERPROOF" BELTS. 




Guaranteed 

Reliable 

and 

Economical 


J.L.Goodhue G8k> Co., Limited 

DANVILLE, P. Q. 


Write to-day 

for 

Details and 

Prices 










PNEUMATIC RIVSTSR3 — AIR COMPRESSORS PNEUMATIC CHIPPERS 

RAND CLASS "NE-I" AIR COMPRESSORS 




THE CLASS "NE-I" 
STRAIGHT LINE POWER 
DRIVEN COMPRESSOR 

with enclosed dust-proof frames, 
splash lubrication, high speed [in- 
let and outlet valves, is thef latest 
development in small air com- 
pressor design. 

The frame forms a reservoir for oil which 
is literally showered over all bearings 
and reciprocating parts, after which it is 
returned to the oil basin to be used again 
and again with no waste andj little 
dissipation. 

The class "NE-I" is simple, rigid and 
powerful and marks a distinct evolution in 
straight line power driven machines. 
CAPACITIES ranging from 50 to 300 cubic 
feet of free air'per. minute. 



Canadian; RAND Co., Limited 

COMMERCIAL UNION BUILDING, MONTREAL 

Offices at ^--TORONTO COBALT, WINNIPEG, LETHBRIDGE, ROSSLAND, VANCOUVER, HALIFAX. 



AIR HOISTS SAND RAMMERS BLOW GUNS 



The advertiser would like to know where yon saw fits advertisement — tell htm. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



3] 



Kenold Patent Silent Chains 

Hans Ren old/ Limited, Manchester, England, the Sole Mfrs. in the WORLD. 




Transmit at a high speed 
any power and do it as 
quietly as a belt with the 
certainty of gears. 

Being positive, effect 
a continuous saving of 
power. 

Not affected by Heat or 
Dampness. 



(A Renold Silent Chain driving a mine hoist troma 150 H.P. Motor. Centers 6 teet.) 



JONES £& GLASSCO <w MONTREAL 




STEEL CASTING 



By the TROPENAS CONVERTER PROCESS 

The above process is used by the leading Open Hearth steel foundries 
of Great Britain and the United States for small castings, as it gives a 
superior casting, true to pattern and of the highest grade of steel. We 
have the most modern and best equipped foundry in Canada for 
handling small steel castings up to four hundred pounds weight. 

High Grade Grey Iron Castings and 

Pattern Work 

Parker Foundry Company, Limited 



STEEL FOUNDRY 
||27 TANSLEY ST. 



MONTREAL 



GREY IRON FOUNDRY 
18-27 DALHOUSIE ST. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



32 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



FOR THE JOBBING SHOP 

An Ideal Lathe 




The Double Duty 

Bertram Gap Lathe 

It possesses all the accuracy and "rigidity of the small lathe, and 
in addition can do relatively large work, by removing the loose 
pieces forming the ways of the bed and using the Gap. 

The Gap is strongly boxed and adds to the strength of the bed. 
The loose pieces are accurately machined and fitted to the Gap and 
held in place by bolts and taper pins. 

The Bertram Gap Lathe makes an ideal machine for jobbing 
shops that occasionally receive work that is too large to handle in an 
ordinary lathe. 

SEND FOR PHOTOSfAND BULLETIN. 
SALES AGENTS: 

The Canadian Fairbanks Company, Limited 

Fairbanks Scales.— Safes and Vaults.— Fairbanks-Morse Gas Engines. 

Montreal St. John, N.B. Toronto Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary Vancouver 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 




The Field for Commercial Grinding 



/""» RINDING iii various forms has been 
^ known to man from the very be- 
ginning of history, yet it is doubtful if 
many engineers have a clear conception 
of the field for metal grinding. Experi- 
ence (as a specialist) covering twenty- 
five years has taught me that the usual 
thought of grinding is that it is a slow, 
tedious, expensive, but sure method of 
obtaining accuracy, and that where great 
accuracy is not required grinding should 
not be done. 

When, within the recollection of the 
writer, mechanics made their own solid 
glue and emery wheels with which to 
grind small hardened tool work, it did 
not occur to them that they could do by 
grinding a certain part of the work that 
they were using steel tools for, because 
it was grinding, and was slow. More- 
over, all nice work must of necessity 
take lots of time, because our older 
mechanics had said so. It did not occur 
to them that we could ever have better 
grinding wheels and better machines in 
which to use them. 

It was at this point in our reasoning 
that the majority of engineers rested 
and it is here that we find a large num- 
ber now. All engineers admit the exact- 
ness of grinding, but most of them still 
believe it to be slow. 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of Applied 
Mechanics, published as late as 1893, 
says that emery wheels are employed 
mainly for producing cutting edges and 
for smoothing surfaces. Again it says 
that in all cases of the employment of 
emery wheels in place of steel cutting 
tools, the operation is considerably slow- 
er, and it may be laid down as a rule 

•Abstract of paper read at New York meet- 
ing of American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, December, 1910. 

••Norton Grinding Co., Worcester, Mass. 



By C. H. Norton * * 

that save upon metal too hard to be 
operated upon with steel tools, the emery 
wheel cannot compete with the ordinary 
lathe, planer, milling tool, etc. My ob- 
servations convince me that a great 
many American engineers hold the same 
views. 

What the Wheel Will Do. 

As a specialist for many years, I have 
seen a gradual but sure increase of 
knowledge of grinding and have noted 
the widening of the field as the result, 
but I am not aware that the intelligent 
study of grinding has been taken up by 
professional engineers or by any insti- 
tute of technology. The intelligent use 
of grinding yields such large returns 
that it warrants careful study by the 
very best engineering and scientific 
minds and a place in the courses of our 
technical schools. The field is constant- 
ly broadening with each year's improve- 
ments in grinding wheels and grinding 
machines, and it is time that men of 
brains and education took a hand with 
us to help the world to a better know- 
ledge of the science of grinding and 
grinding wheels. 

The results thus far attained warrant 
a change of the world's idea of grinding 
and instead of using it as a synonym for 
slowness, tediousness and drudgery, it 
should be a synonym for rapidity, ac- 
curacy and economy. 

The fact that grinding with the mod- 
ern grinding machine and grinding wheel 
(not emery wheel) is that it enables us 
to size all around work cheaper than by 
turning and filing, that it takes the place 
of what we formerly called the finish 
cut of the lathe and all filing, giving us 
not a theoretical perfect cylinder or per- 
fect finish, but a much nearer perfect 



cylinder and finish than we obtained 
with the lathe. It gives us diameters to 
such small limits as to be called exact, 
but whoever insists that none but exact 
work be ground loses the very pith of 
grinding, which is economy. Modei-n 
grinding means cheaper cost for all work, 
many grades of work to suit many re- 
quirements, and cheaper turning than is 
-possible without the use of the grinding 
machine. 

As a rule, the coarser the turning the 
greater the economy by grinding. The 
greatest economy is obtained by the com- 
bination of cheaper turning and grind- 
ing. It is no longer necessary to turn 
work smooth, straight or correctly to 
size, and the lathe is no longer necessary 
as a precision tool. If it has a carriage 
traverse of from four to ten threads per 
inch, has sufficient power to carry high- 
speed tool cuts at that feed and is well 
supplied with steady rests to prevent 
springing of the work, it is ready for co- 
operation with the grinding machine. It 
is easier with modern grinding machines 
and wheels to grind off a given amount 
of metal when in Hie form of crude 
screw lli reads than in any other form, 
and with long work having several sizes 
the grinding requires less time if 1-D2 to 
5-64 inch is left on the diameter for 
grinding than if the work is turned care- 
fully to within 0.002 to 0.005 inch. In 
all cases, accurate turning increases the 
total cost of production and in some it 
makes the grinding very expensive. The 
greatest economy is usually obtained by 
the combination of grinding with rough 
turning. Yet there are cases where the 
least expensive way is to grind direct 
without turning, notably the greater 
part of crankshafts of automobiles and 
small gas engines and very long and 
slender work where turning is difficult. 



34 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



It I* not an easy matter to Becure such 
tough taming as true economy requires 
in connection with grinding. Lack of 
knowledge of what is needed, coupled 
with the natural pride the workman 
takes in doing what tradition says is 
nice lathe work, prevents the grinding 
machine from doing what it is read] to 
do. Our industries are losing much 
while waiting for the engineer to assume 
the inUilligent guidance of foreman and 
workmen who, through fear, doubt or 
prejudice now rob as of the great econo- 
mies due to modern grinding machines. 
There is much \et to he learned by fore- 
men and workmen about turning. Eigh- 
speed steel makes possible much that lias 
not as yet become common knowledge. 

The AttiLe is a very old tool and fore- 
men and workmen have known it for 

generations, yet 1 have been unable to 
lind more than two instances where a 
eareful study has been made of the com- 
bination of lathe work and grinding to 
effect the maximum saving. I have ob- 
served that lathe men have not tried to 
remove metal by increasing the number 
of cuts and using fast traverse. When 
urged to take coarse feeds to help the 
grinding machine to effect a total sav- 
ing, they have invariably said that they 
were feeding all that the work would 
stand. It has been demonstrated that 
three cuts with a carriage traverse of 6 
per inch produced certain work in 9 min- 
utes that required 13 minutes to turn in 
one cut, because the work was so frail 
that with one cut no faster feed than 32 
per inch could be taken. The rough- 
ridged surface was readily ground by 
taking one minute more than when the 
turning was finer, the net saving for the 
job being three minutes. In many cases 
the ridged surface requires no additional 
time. 

In another case where the work was 
quite lirm and was being revolved at a 
very high speed with a view to getting 
everything possible from the high-speed 
tool, the turning required five minutes 
and the grinding one minute. A change 
made in the feed of the lathe so 
that without revolving the work any 
slower it was tinned in one minute, leav- 
ing a very crude, crooked and bad-look- 
ing piece of lathe work. The grinding 
then required two minutes, but the net 

time >aved was three minutes. What did 

it matter how bad looking a lathe job it 

if the finished work was perfect and 

three minutes was saved? 

Grinding Makes Old Tools Useful. 

There is a rich field tor engineers and 
managers in connection with the lathe 
and modern grinding. Recent lathe de- 
signs provide for high speed of revolu- 
tion, with sufficient power, quick change 
to and from back gears, and sufficient 



rigidity to utilize to the limit high speed 
steel, but much work is not of sufficient 
rigidity to permit the maximum use of 
the tool at fast traverse and deep cuts. 
In addition, there are thousands of 
lathes of old design that will not be 
thrown away at once. There is, there- 
fore, an opportunity to get much more 
out of present plants by cheaper turn- 
ing because of grinding. 

Developments warrant the conclusion 
that we should no longer assume that 
simply because a tool is a grinding wheel 
it cannot remove metal and size and 




Fig. 1 — Microphotograph of chips from modern 
grinding wheel. Note the resemblance of . . 
these fragments to lathe chips. 

shape work as quickly as a steel tool. 
Rather, we should use the steel tool when 
it can be made to remove metal, size and 
shape work cheapest, and the grinding 
wheel when it excels. It is no longer to 
be taken as a matter of course that we 
can turn, plane and mill faster than we 
can grind. After all, the real reason we 

firs*/ • ;»># 









V 



!d£tf 



Fig. 2 Mil ropliotograpii of chips from modern 
grinding wheel. 

remove metal is to accomplish certain 

finished results, not simply to secure a 
certain number of pounds of chips in a 
given time. Before long I think all pro- 
gressive engineers will understand that 
both the grinding wheel and the steel 
tool have their place for metal cutting. 
The old thought of abrasion must give 
way to the new thought of cutting. 

While it is still true that poor wheels 
or good wheels poorly selected and 
wrongly used will still remove metal very 
-lowly by abrasion, it is also true that 



the old-fashioned milling cutter, with 
tine teeth cut by hand with a tile, hard- 
ened but never ground, and used in the 
old-time slender milling machine would 
very slowly abrade the surface. The 
modern grinding wheel, used in a mod- 
ern machine by a modern man, is just 
as surely a milling cutter as if it were 
made of steel. 

The microscope reveals the fact that 
such a wheel cuts off chips. Fig. 1 is 
from a microphotograph and clearly 
shows the chips that are as surely cut 
off as those made with a steel milling 
cutter. The grinding wheel used was 
a modern one made of ci-ystalline alum- 
inum oxide. 

Fig. 2 is also from a microphotograph 
and shows the result of the old-fashioned 
abrasion described by Webster as grind- 
ing to powder. Here we see the effect 
of great heat, the greater part of the 
powder being in the form of globules. 
This is magnified to the same extent as 
Fig. 1 and shows the vast difference be- 
tween the old-time abrasion to powder 
and the present cutting cliips. A large 
part of the energy put into work was 
wasted in heat, as shown by the very 
small globules in Fig. 2. The wheel 
used for Fig. 2 was an emery wheel like 
those referred to in Appleton's Cyclo- 
pedia of 1893. 



TARIFF ON RE-ROLLED RAILS. 

For some years rails which have been 
re-rolled in the United States have been 
admitted into Canada on payment of a 
duty equivalent to 25 per cent, of the 
work done on them. The Canadian gov- 
ernment has issued an order-in-council 
which states that a mill has been estab- 
lished in Canada adapted for re-rolling 
rails used on railway tracks weighing 
not less than 56 pounds a lineal yard 
when re-rolled, and orders that the spec- 
ial duty on such re-rolled rails shall be 
abolished and that they shall be subject 
to t lie general tariff. Hereafter rails re- 
rolled in the United States can only be 
re-imported on the payment of $7 per 
ton. It is charged that new rails have 
been brought in as re-rolled rails. 



INCREASING THEIR STAFF. 

Merril Z. Fox, for the past six years 
connected with the Hill & Griffith Co., 
Cincinnati, has joined the Detroit Foun- 
dry Supply Co., of Detroit, St. Paul and 
Windsor, Ont., as viee-presdent. The 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co. announce 
also that they have secured the services 
of J. H. Lyle who will cover the states 
of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa, and H. 
E. Mover, who will cover the states of 
Indiana, Ohio and the Dominion of Can- 
ada. The Detroit Foundry Supply Co. 
are congratulating themselves on secur- 
ing the services of these men who under- 
stand the foundry lines thoroughlv 



Efficiency of Tools and Economy in Their Manufacture 

By W. M. Townsend * 

Some Points From (i Paper Read Before the Canadian Railway Club, Relative to the Mak- 
ing of <'l>< up and Efficient Tools, Including Milling Cutters, Tonls for Lathes, Planers, 
Shapers and Slotters,' Drills and Reamers. 



"WWRIOUS kinds of milling machines 
are becoming more prominent 
in removing surplus stock from ma- 
chine and locomotive parts, hence the 
m ?8jssity of having 1 durable milling' cut- 
ters. 

To obtain an efficient milling cutter 
there are two points which are essen- 
tial, namely high speed steel and a 
spiral or 'helical cutting edge. The lat- 
ter quality may not appeal to some, due 
to the fact that an inserted' tooth cut- 
ter made from a mild steel body with 
a high speed steel blade inserted at an 
angle of about 12 degrees, answers fair- 
ly well. This, however, is a great- mis- 
take. To obtain a clean cut it is neces- 
sary to have a certain amdl constant 
angle of rake or lip to the milling cut- 
ter. This can be obtained only by hav- 
ing a helical or spiral cutting edge. 

To construct the milling cutter that 
wtill give the best results and still ad- 
here to the principle of strict economy 
(the point which I wish to emphasize 
mostly in this paper), we must first of 
all consider its diameter. We will first 
speak of cutters having a diameter of 
over G inches. Keeping close to our 
principle of economy, we apply to the 
scrap heap for material ; there we will 
find crop ends of billet steel sawn from 
the ends of driving - axles, which make 
an ideal body for an inserted tooth high 
speed steel milling: cutter. The scrap 
value of these crop ends is very small, 
hence the low cost for the body of the 
cutter. Now, to procure high speed steel 
for the blades in an economical manner 
(which if cut from the steel bar would 
cost 50 cents per pound), we collect all 
the broken and short high speed tools 
that cannot be further used on planers, 
shapers. lathes, etc. These are hammer- 
ed into blades %xl^x5 inches long. 
The cost of material for the blades is 
covered by the cost of labor in ham- 
mering out the steel plus its scrap 
value, which is very small. So much 
for the economy in procuring material. 

We will now turn our attention to 
the design, upon which depends the ef- 
ficiency. The bodies, after having been 
bored, turned, and faced, are milled 
with slots % in. wide, % in. deep, V/2 
in. apart, at an angle corresponding to 
a predetermined helix or spiral. The 
blades are then fitted and slightly calk- 
ed. The cutter is then set up on a uni- 

•Supervisor of Tools, Montreal Locomotive 
Co., Montreal. 



versal milling machine, an. I the front of 
the blades milled spiral. This gives a 
constant angle of rake or lip from one 
end to the other. This insures an equal 
strain along the whole length of the 
blade. On the other hand, if the blades 
art' merely put in on an angle and not 
milled spiral, the lip or rake of the cut- 
ter is irregular. It can readily be seen 
that from one end of the cutter to the 
centre there will be a decreasing lip, 
while from the centre to the other end 
of the cutter there will be an increasing 
drag. This causes an unevenness in the 
cut and also a tendency to break and 
pull out the blades on the drag side. 
So much for cutters having a diameter 
over six inches. 

Inserted tooth cutters with a diam- 
eter much less than six inches are not 
practical, due to the fact that a slot cut 
at an angle across the top of the cutter 
body would be very irregular in depth, 
hence the impossibility of holding the 
blade. Take for example a blank cut- 
ter body 5 inches diameter, 10 inches 
long, cut a slot through the top at an 
angle of about 15 deg., you would have 
a depth of about % inch in the centre, 
while at either end there would be no 
depth to speak of. This can be avoided, 
however, by dividing the cutter into 
short sections, thereby lessening the 
unequal depth caused by cutting a slot 
at an angle to the axis of the cutter, 
but the high cost of this method does 
not warrant its adoption. 

Cost Figures. 

The general practice, in making cut- 
ters of smaller dimensions, is to use 
carbon steel costing about 14c. per 
pound. This is altogether unnecessary 
and extravagant. Billet crop ends se- 
lected from high carbon billets such as 
are used for driving axles, piston, and 
side rods, carefully hammered, out- 
classes in every way the ordinary tool 
steel. In the first place its cost, ham- 
mered to size, is about l 1 ■_><•. per pound, 
as compared with 14c. per pound for 
tool steel. Secondly, it is tougher, and 
the teeth will not break when a heavy 
cut is put on, such as is the case with 
tool steel, and the cutting edge stands 
up equally as well. The success of this 
method, of course, depends upon the 
treatment of hardening. This, however, 
is very simple, and consists of carefully 
packing the tools to be hardened in a 
mixture of salt and raw bone, placed in 



an air-tight box, which should be 
bra tight ami kept to a heat of L,500 
deg. Fah. from 24 to 48 hours according 
to size, then drawn from the box and 
quickly immersed in running' clear 
water. There is no need whatever of 
drawing the temper, as the cutting edge 
has the correct hardness, while the body 
of the cutter remains very tough. 

Hardening Cutters. 

The question that you would natur- 
ally raise at this point would be: How 
deep can cutters be hardened in this 
manner? I may say that a depth of 
.'S-8 inches can be reached, or in other 
words the cutter may be ground until 
the tooth is almost ground away, leav- 
ing no space for the chips to get away. 
When a cutter reaches this stage, it can 
be annealed, recut, and rehardened, as 
often as the thickness of material will 
allow, without affecting the quality of 
the cutter. 

Some three years ago a test was made 
at our works to determine the advantage 
of using high speed steel cutters for a 
certain class of work, namely — milling 
out jaws of side rods, transmission 
bars, radius bars, combination levers, 
etc. It was found that the high speed 
steel cutters broke from the vibration 
and pressure brought to bear upon 
them, whilst cutters of the same design 
made from billet steel case hardened, 
did the work very satisfactorily without 
breaking, running at the same speed and 
feed. I wish to remind you that what 
T have said so far regarding milling cut- 
ters refers to cutters used for straight 
milling. Cutters used for milling gears, 
taps, reamers, and irregular shapes 
should, in my opinion, be made from 
high speed steel. 

Tn studying the efficiency and econ- 
omy of tools, we must not forget to 
consider the quality and quantity of 
work required of them. 

Tools for Lathes, Etc. 

We now come to tools such as are 
used on lathes, planers, shapers, and 
slotters. There are many brands of 
high speed steel on the market at the 
present time, and I have tried almost 
all of them, but will not express my 
opinion regarding their . merits, as it 
would make this paper appear as an 
advertisement. T believe, however, that 
if we wish to ascertain which is the 
most efficient steel, we should give every 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



brand an extensive trial, making an in- 
dividual record of each, ami determin- 
ing which is the best, as compared t>> 
the price paid for it. Differenl shops 
have differenl materials to contend with, 
and the formulae used in the composi- 
tion of steel differ, so that some brands 
are better lor cutting one class of ma- 
terial, while other brands are better for 
cutting other classes of material. This 
i- why 1 contend that each shop should 
test out every brand and see which is 
best adapted lor its requirements. 

Using High Speed Steel Tips. 
High speed steel is an immense item 
in large machine shops, and great care 

should he exercised in order to avoid 

waste. A great saving maj he made, by 
observing the following practice. In 

making finishing tools, instead of using 
a piece of high speed steel, say 1*4 in. 

Ia - l i in. by 15 in. long, costing about 
ollars, we go hack to the old re- 
liable, and use a piece of billet steel, 
leaving it as large as the tool post will 
admit, and weld a tip to it made of high 
speed steel. The finished cost of this 
tool is about one-eighth of the solid high 
speed steel tool and is just as efficient 
for these reasons : The billet steel is 
sufficiently strong to withstand the 
pressure brought upon it for a finishing 
cut. It does not require dressing any 
oftener than the solid tool, but it does 
require a little more care. 

i will now explain a little more clear- 
ly how this tool is made. As stated he- 
fore, we take a piece of high carbon 
billet from the scrap heap, and draw it 
out to the required dimensions. One 
end is then scarffed ready to receive the 
high speed steel tip which is wedge 
shaped. The toolsmith fits the two 
parts fairly well together before weld- 
ing to ensure a neat weld. The parts 
after having been prepared are then 
I. the tip being allowed to heat 
r than the body, owing to the ne- 
former being of a much 
higher temperature than the latter to 
allow for welding. When both are at 
a welding heat they are quickly with- 
drawn, a piece of Lafitte welding com- 
pound is placed between them and ham- 
mered lightly together. The tool is then 
reheated, care being taken to place the 
nose of the tool in such manner that it 
will be most exposed to the fire, When 
the required beat is reached the tool is 
quickly withdrawn and placed between 
a former under a steam hammer and 
given a light sharp blow. In case of I he 
t i f > being displaced, it will not do to try 
and knock them into place again. The 
tip must lie cut away and refitted, and 
a fresh piece of the compound used. The 
tool is then treated in the same manner 

;i- ;i high Bpeed Steel tool. These tools 



been used until the tip has been 
ground right down to the weld. 

I would not advise making hea\> 
roughing tools iu this manner, as the 
billet steel body would not stand the 
pressure required by a roughing tool 
such as is used on a heavy planer. A 
tool oi this description, however, an- 
swers well when used on a lathe where 
the point does not project far from the 
tool post, also where the cut is conti- 
nuous and not intermittent, as is the 
ease on a planer. You can readily see 
w iiere, thi' saving comes in, if this meth- 
od is only applied to finishing and lathe 
tools. 

Twist Drills. 
I will now draw your attention to 
twist drills. Twist drills made Irom 
carbon steel with the exception ol' job- 
bers' drills, that is, drills up to £" dia- 
meter, are almost a thing of the past, 
high speed steel drills having taken their 
place. The original design of the high 
speed drill was exactly the same as the 
ordinary carbon drill with the exception 
of the material used. This, however, 
has proven to be inefficient and expen- 
sive due to the following reasons : In 
the first place, to obtain proper results 
from a high speed drill, it is necessary 
to have adequate space to allow the 
chips to free themselves from the drill, 
as the flutes will soon choke up owing 
to the increased feed and speed of the 
drill. The fluted high speed drill has not 
this advantage. It is expensive for this 
reason. To make a drill of this design, 
it is necessary to use a round bar of 
solid steel, cutting away 50 per cent, of 
it to form the flutes. Yet there are 
men who will tell you that this design 
of drill is the best and cheapest on the 
market. 

Best High Speed Drill. 
1 will now give my opinion as to 
which is the best high speed drill and 
the reason why. A high speed steel drill 
with a twisted section about half way 
between the flat twisted section and the 
standard milled drill is the most effi- 
cient and economical, from the fact that 
it takes just one-third of the steel to 
make it, ami efficient because of the ade- 
quate space for the chips to clear, thus 
preventing clogging and choking. The 
feed can be doubled due to this advan- 
tage. I have found in my endeavor to 
reduce the cost of tools, that in the 
average shop where locomotives and 
heavy machines are built, they have suf- 
ficient equipment to make efficient high 
speed drills with a saving from 10 per 
cent, to 50 per cent. The same may be 
said of all kinds of taps, especially those 
used in boiler construction. These re- 
marks may seem severe to the tool sup- 
ply men here with us to-night, but this 
is one point which I feel that I cannot 
leave out, seeing that our subject is 
along the lines of economy. 



Reamers. 
A few words may be said regarding 
reamers. There are many styles of 
straight reamers, all of which have their 
advantages, which leaves me with noth- 
ing to say regarding them. Taper ream- 
ers are different in their action, however, 

inasmuch as the whole part of the ream- 
er that comes in contact with the work 
is cutting equally, whereas, in the 
straight reamer, the extreme end is the 
only part that cuts, the rest of the 
reamer only acting as a guide. It is 
this difference of action that I now wish 
to discuss. In all railroad shops there 
is a great amount of taper reaming to 
be done ; this calls for a different class 
ol reamer. Having visited some of the 
large locomotive works and enquiring 
I ioin others, I find that their practice is . 
to use the straight fluted taper reamer 
— some ol them have the teeth staggered, 
others equally spaced. 1 beg to state 
that this style of reamer is decidedly 
wrong. Reamers that are required to 
cut equally their full length of flute 
should be milled with a left hand spiral 
cutting edge, having an angle of about 
20 deg. ; the pitch or distance between 
the teeth should be about £", leaving 
ample space for the chips to clear, thus 
preventing clogging and tearing of the 
hole. The advantages of this style of 
reamer are : It takes about 30 per cent, 
less power to drive it ; it never chat- 
ters ; it never digs in ; the tang does not 
twist off ; the teeth do not break off ; 
they are easy on crank shafts and can be 
driven with an air motor, where straight 
fluted reamers would stick. Now this 
may appear that I am claiming a little 
more than what is true, hut these are 
actual facts that have been tried and 
proven. 

There are two reasons for the success 
of this style of reamer, namely, the 
spiral cutting edge which gives the ream- 
er a shearing action instead of a straight 
drag (which must necessarily follow 
with a straight flute), also to the fact 
that the line of cut parallel to the 
length of reamer is divided, due to the 
angular cutting edge which is not paral- 
lel to the line of cut. The even and 
regular curl of chip made by this reamer 
will also convince you of the correctness 
of design. The cost of these reamers is 
a trifle less than the straight fluted 
reamers, on account of the fewer number 
of teeth to be cut. This applies gener- 
ally to reamers having a diameter of 
1£" and under, with a flute of from 14" 
to 16", standard taper 1-16" to 12". 

Large Diameter Reamer. 
A word or two may be said regarding 
reamers of large diameter, such as cross- 
head reamers both for piston and wrist 
pin fit. For cheapness and durability 
these may be made in the same manner 
as solid milling cutters, as mentioned in 
the previous part of this paper. Select 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



37 



a piece of high carbon billet from the 
scrap heap, have the forging well ham- 
mered, machine and case harden, and you 
will have a tool that is equal to the fin- 
est tool steel made. You will find that 
the cost will be about one-tenth of that 
of good tool steel. 

There are many other items of inter- 
est whereby great savings can be made, 
but as our subject covers such a wide 
area, I must confine my remarks to one 
or two thoughts in general. Before con- 
cluding, I wish to state that AN IM- 
MENSE SAVING MAY BE MADE BY 
ANNEALING ALL BROKEN AND 
WORN-OUT TOOLS, IMMEDIATELY 
THEY ARE OUT OF SERVICE. This 
being done they should be arranged in 
open bins or racks, so that when the 
foreman of the tool room requires ma- 
terial, he looks over his stock of anneal- 
ed scrap (I mention annealed for the 
reason that very often a piece of scrap 



material is available, but it is necessary 
to wait while it is being annealed) and 
very often finds exactly what he wants 
without drawing from the regular stock. 

Another feature regarding economy, is 
the correct distribution. I mean by this 
that EVERY MAN SHOULD HAVE 
ALL THE TOOLS HE REQUIRES 
AND NO MORE. I say this because it 
is well-known fact that workmen have a 
habit of collecting and storing up under 
lock and key, all the tools they can pos- 
sibly lay their nands on, for their own 
individual use. 

You can readily see that with this 
practice, if not watched and kept in 
hand, in large plants many thousands of 
dollars may be invested and nothing ac- 
complished. 

In summing up these remarks, I think 
you will agree with me, when I say that 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY IN 



LARGE PLANTS, TO HAVE A MAN 
THAT, IS FULLY ACQUAINTED WITH 
EVERY DETAIL OF TOOL DESIGN, 
TOOL PURCHASING, AND TOOL DIS- 
TRIBUTION, TO PROPERLY EFFECT 
A SYSTEM WHICH WOULD RESULT 
IN EFFICIENCY, AND ECONOMY. I 
might add that these duties cannot be 
expected of the tool room foreman, as 
his duties confine him to the tool room. 
Under these circumstances the man ap- 
pointed to perform the duties of econo- 
mizing in cost, and designing efficient 
tools, should have the liberty, to watch 
all machine shop operations, and to have 
full supervision of tool room practices. 
This system is in vogue in some of the 
large locomotive works in the United 
States and one that I know of in Can- 
ada. This system, if adopted by some 
of the other large plants, would, I feel 
sure, bring about results worth noting. 



A User's View of the Machine Tool Problem 

By John Riddell ** 

Some Suggestions Looking Toward Improvement in Lathes, Automatic Screw Machines 
and Drills, With the Idea of Reducing the Number of Operations That These Machines 
are Usually Made Capable of, so as to Accord More With Actual Service. The Preblem 
of Safe-guarding Machinery is Dealt With, to Show That Much yet Remains to be Done 
to Ensure Immunity From Accident Through Carelessness or Otherwise. The Paragraph* 
on Noise in Machine Shops, and Muslin Pinions, Will Appeal to Our Reader* as Item* of 
More Than Passing Interest in the Record of Progress. 



TN factories having a very large out- 
put, there must necessarily be a 
great deal of repetition work, such as 
cylinders, valves, connecting rods, crank 
and cam shafts, transmissions, etc. It 
would seem that most of these parts 
should be made on very special tools. 

Lathes. 
The writer has been considering seri- 
ously for a number of years the advis- 
ability of having instead of standard en- 
gine lathes, simple turning machines, to 
produce such pieces as small shafts, 
which are required in more or less large 
quantities. It has been the practice for 
a long time, when if several lathes were 
required for any particular department, 
standard engine lathes would be pur- 
chased, which machines would be fully 
equipped with screw cutting, cross feed, 
rod feed, compound rest, large and 
small face plates, and very frequently, 
with an extra block for large out- 
side turning. Experience has taught us, 
however, that an engine lathe once plac- 
ed in one of our shafting departments 
would, in many cases, wear itself out 
before having to do any face-plate or 

♦Abstract of a paper read before the Na- 
tional Machine Tool Builders' convention. 

"General mechanical superintendent, Gen- 
eral r.\e< trie Co., Schenectady, N.Y. 



chucking work, and very seldom, screw 
cutting. You can, therefore, see that 
the cross feed, as well as screw cutting, 
would be superfluous. 

Lathes for this work should be equipp- 
ed with a powerful rod feed, and with a 
suitable friction device which would slip 
if the turning tool met with any ob- 
struction, and prevent serious accident 
to the machine. 

Such machines should be so designed 
that the screw-cutting attachment and 
cross feed could be readily applied, if in 
the future they should be required. 

Many attempts have been made to 
solve the problem of small shaft turn- 
ing, with more or less success, but many 
of the machines designed for this pur- 
pose have been more or less complicat- 
ed, which precludes the possibility of 
putting inexperienced men on to run 
them. 

A lathe to be used exclusively for 
shaft turning, say from about 2 to 4 
inches in diameter, would not require 
the range of speeds as for a standard 
engine lathe. The lathe I have in mind 
should have a range of speed of from 
about 20 to about 250 revolutions per 
minute for turning, and two or three 
higher speeds for filing and polishing. 
These speeds should possibly be between 



450 and 600 revolutions per minute. It 
is desirable in our case at least to have 
such machines fitted for electric motors. 
The motors should have a speed varia- 
tion of about two to one, which, with 
two or three gear changes, should give 
all the speeds necessary for a simple 
turning machine. 

Automatic Screw Machines and Turret 
Lathes. 

The automatic screw machine, in a 
general way, is made so that six, seven, 
or eight operations can be performed on 
most any of them. A very large quan- 
tity of work going through them re- 
quires but two or three operations at 
the most, such as milling, threading, 
and cutting off. Many of the screw ma- 
chines are so complicated that they will 
perform the operations whether the 
tools are actually working or not. 

It would seem that machines could be 
very much simplified by making some 
do three or four operations only. 

The same is true of some larger au- 
tomatic turret machinery. Some of 
these machines are designed for boring 
and facing, but nevertheless, the turret 
will have five or six positions, all of 
which operations must be gone through 
with whether there are but one or two 



- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



simple operations to be performed, at 

the loss ol much valuable tunc 

\ great deal might be done toward 
adapting multiple-spindle heads to 
single-spindle presses It is very doubt- 
ful it", as at present constructed, it is 
good judgment to put in too main ex- 
pensive multiple-spindle drills, tor the 
reason that it takes so long to adjust 
them for a small number of pieces. 
Radial Drills. 

Radial drills generall] should he so 
stiffened up as to permit ^<i only the 
smallest amount ol spring to the arm. 
I believe more drills are ruined by the 
springing of .urns, both under the actual 
ire ami when a drill is breaking 
through, than would he if it were not 
for the springing referred to, as, under 
the pressure of drilling the arm goes 
up, and when the pressure is relieved 
from the point the drills are forced 
through, and, in many cases catch on 
the lips and break 

Protected Devices and Wood-Working 
Machines. 

We have had considerable trouble at 
the Schenectady works of the General 
Electric Co. lately, in trying to con- 
form to the new State laws, which are 
very stringent as to the protective de- 
vices on machine tools in general and 
wood-working machines in particular. It 
is an exceedingly difficult matter to so 
protect bu/./. planers and circular saws 
as to guard against carelessness and the 
apparent indifference of the workmen, 
and if someone would devise proper 
ways and means for protecting such ma- 
chines he would have the thanks and 
blessing of the whole manufacturing fra- 
ternity. 

If an operator has a great many pieces 
of a similar kind to either saw, plane 
or shape, he may possibly take pains to 
apply such guards, which are usually 
provided, but if, as frequently happens, 
a man wants to plane one single piece 
or saw a strip from a board, he will 
not take time to adjust the safety ap- 
pliance, and he is very apt to be caught. 
This would point out the necessity of 
havine some suitable guards which 
would always be available no matter 
what the conditions were, and it would 
seem that people producing this parti- 
cular line of machinery would conjure 
up something practicable and effective 
Punch Presses. 

Punch presses in general are very well 
designed, hut they, like wood-working 
machinery, are comparatively dangerous 
to the lingers of careless or dreamy op- 
erators. This would suggest automatic 
feed mechanisms and something to take 
the piece from the dies after the oper- 
ation is completed There have been in- 
numerable devices of this kind exploited, 
but nothing as yet seems to cover the 
ground fully. 



Another delect in this class of machin- 
erv is the fact that in many instances 
when clutches and other parts come 
loose, due to wear, they are very apt 
to repeat the stroke. This frequently 
happens when a man's hand is between 
the dies Such accidents should be im- 
possible until the operator deliberately 
steps on the treadle. 

Noise in Machine Shops. 
It has been pointed out that there is a 
great deal of gear noise in the machine 
shops of the present day. I am sorry to 
admit that this is true, but it is not 
wholly due to the fact that there are 
more gears used in the construction of 
machine loots. It is more especially 
due to the higher speeds at which ma- 
chines are run to-day, as compared to 
ten or twenty years ago. Before the 
advent of high-speed steels 2(1 feet was 
considered to be a fair cutting speed for 
an ordinary steel shaft or a piece of 
cast iron to be either turned or planed; 
whereas to-day, we are actually turn- 
ing shafts at from 75 feet to 125 feet 
per minute. So it will readily be seen 
that machines to-day are producing from 
three to six times more work than they 
did a few years ago ; hence it should 
follow that there would be more noise 
due to machine tools producing this 
extra amount of work. These gear 
noises are very unfortunate, but we 
hope by improved gear-cutting machinery 
and the use of various other materials 
which have recently been introduced, 
that this trouble will gradually disap- 
pear. 

Muslin Pinions. 

We have introduced gears at our 
Schenectady works and pinions made of 
a high grade of muslin which have been 
applied to a great variety of uses. We 
have used one of them on a boiler- 
maker's punch and shear which prev- 
iously gave considerable trouble, not 
only on account of noise, but in the ac- 
tual breaking of the gears ; due to ex- 
cessive back lash and flywheel action on 
the machine. We had such wonderful 
success with that particular pinion, 
which has been running now some two 
years, that we gradually extended the 
use until now we are using them on two 
10-foot planing machines, which are op- 
erated by electric motors and compress- 
ed-air clutches, as intermediate pinions 
for the reverse motion. Heretofore we 
have tried various substitutes, includ- 
ing bronze, which would go to pieces in 
two or three weeks ; steel would last 
longer, but made an intolerable noise ; 
rawhide would seem to skrink and burn 
out quickly, and we very seldom could 
find anything that would stand the work 
longer than three or four weeks at the 
most 

It is perhaps too early to say much 
about the particular pinions in question, 



but they have at present been running 
four months and they have not yet be- 
gun to show any signs of distress, and 
it looks as though their life would be 
as long as the gears with which they 
mesh. 

Test of Muslin Pinions. 

I might ask your indulgence while I 
describe what has recently been done 
with a pair of these pinions. As I said 
before, we have been using them some 
two years, and are gradually extending 
their use, and have now lifted up a large 
department at the Lynn Works of the 
General Electric Co., where we can pro- 
duce them in fairly large quantities, 
but before putting them out in very 
large quantities we desired to have a life 
test to destruction, and with this in . 
view we rigged up two railway motors 
opposed to each other ; one of which has 
a cloth pinion on the armature shaft 
running into a steel gear on counter- 
shaft On the other end of this counter- 
shaft is another cloth pinion engaging 
with another large steel gear. The other 
side of this steel gear engaging a cast- 
gun-iron pinion of the same dimensions 
as the cloth. This then connects with 
ifs shaft and gear to a rawhide pinion 
on the opposite motor. This particular 
motor is resisted by rheostats to load 
the motor which has the muslin pinion 
In starting this test it was found that 
there were no results from a certain 
load. This load was gradually increased 
and when after stopping the motors to 
examine the pinions, through some 
oversight, an excessive, overload was 
applied when they were again started 
The shock was so severe that it broke 
about one-half of the teeth from the 
gun-iron pinion, leaving the two muslin 
pinions in as good condition as before 
Another gun-iron pinion was put on, 
which also broke. A third was then 
put on and the load reduced, and the 
life test has now been running some two 
or three weeks, and will be continued 
until some of the gears actually wear 
out, and not break. 

I point this out; to show the actual 
strength of pinions made of this mater- 
ial. So we have reason to believe that 
with time the noises in machine shops 
will gradually disappear as they came, 
without, however, a corresponding re- 
duction in output. 



When the belt has become oil-soaked 
and will not stay on the machine, a good 
method of cleaning it is as follows: Coil 
Ihe belt loosely in a tub of sufficient 
size, and cover with whiting. Be sine 
that the whiting sets in between the 
coils of the belt, and it will be only a 
short time before the whiting- will ab- 
sorb the oil from the leather. It will 
then only need to be wiped clean to be 
readv for further use. 



Mechanical Drawing and Sketching for Machinists 

By B. P. 

A Series of Progressive Lessons Designed to Familiarize Mechanics With the Use of the 
Apparatus Necessary to Make Simple Drawing*, to Encourage them to Realize How Im- 
portant a Factor it is of Their Equipment, as Well a* Being n Profitable Pastime. 



'"plJE ability to put one's ideas on 
A "paper" as it is called, is of more 
import than at first sight appears, and 
in passing let me say that without this 
means of developing and conveying 
ideas from one to another, we would 
not yet be far removed from the bar- 
baric age in mechanical arts. 
Purpose of Course. 

You are not to run away with the 
idea that the purpose is to make a 
draftsman of you, and having that no- 
tion decide that as you are a machinist, 
this little instruction page need not be 
read. There will be. it is hoped, no 
limit to any position of responsibility 
or trust to which the instruction max 
lead, but to you particularly is atten- 
tion directed. 

The course will start right at the be- 
ginning so as to embrace all grades, and 
care will be taken to make the work in- 
teresting and not too heavy. 

To those who have some experience 
along the lines of our subject, there will 
be found helpful hints and advice which 
will amply repay joining in the study. 
Difficulties of Study. 

Experience goes to show that the 
difficulty of those who would study in 
their leisure hours is not one of making 
a start, but rather a disinclination to 
keep it up after a short trial. Drawing 
and sketching is no exception in this 
respect. 

To guard against this trouble I wish 
to point out a few of the causes why 
(his state of things obtains, so that you 
may be on the alert when the symptoms 
a ppear. 

Most people are enthusiastic over 
anything new, especially if it appeals 
lo their personal interests. Drawing 
or the desire to be able to make one, 
appeals to 95 per cent, of mechanics, 
young and old, not only as a trade help, 
but also as an enjoyable pastime and a 
medium by which their imaginative 
ideas and dreams may assume concrete 
reality. 

The enthusiasm born of this appeal to 
study, will, as in every other like cir- 
cumstance, bring a reaction, which com- 
ing as it does at a critical time in a 
'hawing instruction course, will require 
the exercise of a good deal of patient 
determination. 

The impression formed by nine out of 
every ten who take up study is that the 



acquirement of knowlege is easy. Tin* 
prospectus descriptions of drawing 

courses arc largely to blame for this. 

The acquirement of knowledge is easy 
in no sphere or profession, and what is 
more to the point, the acquirement of 
the habit of study is less easy still. Too 
little stress is laid on the necessity of 
this latter, in fact it is practically ig- 
nored. 

You have been in the habit of going 
out every night in the week after your 
day's work, to have a little legitimate 
recreation and amusement. You have 




♦First of a series of an Instruction Course. 
A lesson will be given each month. 



Adjustable Drawing Table. 

often thought of studying mechanical 
drawing, but on account of the want of 
a proper opportunity you have never 
done so. 

"Canadian Machinery," which you 
know, is a reliable journal and to which 
you have been subscribing for years, 
comes along in February and outlines 
just the course you have long looked 
for. It takes little time for you to de- 
cide what you will do, and to be sure 
you lay your leisure time at its feet, with 
a generous hand. "I'll give three 
nights a week to this course, and run in 
a fourth occasionally.'' 

You make this resolution without 
counting the cost. You forget that 
habits have been acquired that are an- 
tagonistic to study, and thai those 
necessary cannot be donned in a mom- 
ent as neither can the others lie doffed. 

Taking up the course with a rush as 
it were ensures a reaction, and unfor- 
tunately an unhealthy one at that. You 
are endeavoring to bite off more than you 
can chew, and my advice is — act cauti- 
ously. Set apart one night per week or 
at most two. and allow yourself to 
gradually break off the old habits and 
acquire the new. 



Don't believe that it is easy to learn 
to draw, and that it can be mastered 
in so many days or weeks. Think of 
your stage of proficiency in your own 
particular line, and just figure to your- 
self how long it lias taken you to attain 
it. Don't imagine that drawing is any 
easier and you will assuredly succeed. 

By looking the matter square in the 
face thus, you will not get despondent 
when the reaction sets in and you reg- 
ister your progress as slow. You will 
not be a "sticker," when you look dis- 
gustedly at your drawing board, won- 
dering where all the dirt came from 
that is on your paper, or amazed at the 
unintentional contortions you have giv- 
en to straight lines, the variety of thick- 
ness of them, the seeming impossibility 
of making a circle without showing half 
a dozen joints and at the number and 
size of holes your compass needle point 
has been guilty of. 

These experiences are real, troubles 
which all w ? ho would aspire to the mak- 
ing of a simple intelligible drawing will 
meet, and to minimize and combat which 
the advice and effort of this instruction 
course will be directed on your behalf. 

Operating Hints. 

In order to keep the drawing paper 
as clean as possible, see that your hands 
and finger-nails are carefully washed 
and attended to before commencing 
work. 

Have your coat off, the sleeves of it 
in contact with the drawing impart dirt 
more or less. 

Never sharpen your pencils over your 
drawing or in fact, over the table. 

T'se a hard pencil, say a 3H, it will 
last longer, need sharpening less often 
and will assist in keeping the drawing 
clean. 

Wipe the dust from all your appar- 
atus carefully with a clean duster be- 
fore starting work, and cover up all 
when you finish each time. 

Keep the particles of ground rubber 
brushed off the sheet, as they being 
coated with lead from the erased lines, 
will, if allowed to remain, be crushed 
against the paper by the movements 
over them of the squares. 

The- last instruction on cleanliness i< 
keep your hands as far as is possible 
from touchinc- the paper. Most people's 
bands perspire to a lesser or greater 
extent, and their contact consequently 
is not conducive to a clean drawing. 



Boiler Design, Construction, Operation, Repairing and Inspection 



By H. S. Jeffrey 



I'll, Various Points in Connection With Boiler Piactice Will be Clearly Taken up in 
This s The First Articlt Deals With the Boiler Shell, Including Repairing, Factor 

of Safety, Hydrostatic Test and Number of Courses. The Serif* will be a Complete Text 
Book "ii the Subject of Boilers, and They Should be Preserved for Reference. 



THE points considered by the de- 
signer in designing a boiler are 
most important. The boiler should 
be designed so as to permit pro- 
per circulation of the water; to permit 
the boiler to be easily inspected and 
cleaned; to prevent undue stresses upon 



-h\- 


- . M 


\ ^ \ 


r< 


?--.] 


\h \J 



Fig. 1.— 

some members and insufficient stresses 
upon other parts; to permit repairs to 
be quickly and cheaply made; and the 
proportion of parts to be such that the 
boiler will be a free steamer. 

(2) Any boiler, whether used or not, 
will deteriorate. The deterioration is in 
form of wasting and the wearing out of 
the boiler, both internally and extern- 
ally, such as pitting, corrosion, blisters 
and grooving, all of which means the 
repairing of the boiler, sooner or later. 
The essential part of repairing a boiler 
is to replace the defective part without 
reducing the strength of the boiler at 
that point any more than necessary, 
and, of course, applying the patch or 
new member in a manner to make the 
boiler as serviceable or as near as ser- 
viceable as formerly. 

The foregoing can best be accomplish- 
ed by the mechanic understanding 
the underlying principles of boiler 
design and construction. This being the 
of specialists, many of those engaged 
in boilermaking are not well posted on 
the forces acting upon the boiler. The 





Fig. 2.- 

riveter will understand fully about rivet- 
ing; the flue man about the installation 
of flues, and others thoroughly acquaint- 

• Copyright by The MacLean Publishing Com- 
pany. Limited. 

• First of a series of twelve articles on this 
subject. 



cd with their respective branches, 
but the foregoing named specailists not 
being versed in boilermaking in all its 
branches are not in a position to advise 
as are all-around boiler makers with a 
technical education. 

The repairing of a boiler is really an 
independent branch of boiler construc- 
tion; it is re-construction. Boiler re- 
pairing could be more cheaply and bet- 
ter done if those making the repairs had 
knowledge of the forces acting upon the 
boiler, as well as the knowledge acquir- 
ed by the operating engineer from con- 
stant observation of the boiler while in 
service, and especially the practicability 
of a patch or new member as applied. 
The Boiler Shell. 

(3) The boiler designer in deciding 
upon the diameter of the boiler shell 
must bear in mind the working pressure 



foregoing respective forces a concrete 
case of a seamless shell of 55,000 tensile 
strength, 66 inches in diameter by 14 
feet in length, and of plate %-inch in 
thickness will be given. 

The force acting on the girth plane 
will be equal to the cross-sectional area 
multiplied by the working pressure per 
square inch. With a working pressure 
of 100 pounds per square inch the total 
force will be: 

66X66X-7854X100=342,100 pounds. 

The force resisting the foregoing is 
the strength of the solid plate in the 
transverse plane. The area of the plate 
is found by multiplying the circumfer- 
ence by the neutral diameter, which is 
equal to the inside diameter, plus one 
thickness of plate, or 66 inches pins 
I inch, making 66| inches. 




Fig. 3.- 



per square inch, the factor of safety, 
the efficiency of the longitudinal seam, 
the tensile strength of the plates and 
their thickness, and the type of boiler. 
There are also practical considerations 
which he must take into account, and 
which will be mentioned later. 

A boiler shell or cylinder has two 
forces tending to rupture it. The arrow 
A, Fig. 1, indicates the force acting on 
the transverse plane, or cross-wise of 
the vessel. The arrow B indicates the 
force acting on the longitudinal plane. 
or lengthwise. 

Though the steam pressure per square 
inch is the same throughout the boiler, 
the force acting on the transverse plane, 
generally called the girth plane, is about 
one-half the force acting on the longi- 
tudinal plane. 

In Fig. 1, the vessel is shown seam- 
less, and in order to explain fully the 



Then the area of the plate of the girth 
plane upon which the force will act is: 

661X3.1416X1=78.2 square inches. 

The strength o^ the resisting force of 
the plate of the girth plane will then be: 

78.2X55,000=4,301,000 pounds. 

The force acting on the longitudinal 
plane is equal to the area indicated by 
points 1, 2, 3 and 4, Fig. 1, times the 
working pressure in pounds. Since the 
vessel, Fig. 1, is 66 inches in diameter 
and 14 foot, or 168 inches in length and 
the working pressure is 100 pounds per 
square inch, the total force acting on 
the longitudinal plane will be: 

66X168X100=1,108,800 pounds. 

The resisting force of the plate of 
the longitudinal plane will be the 
length of the vessel from points 1 to 
4, and points 2 to 3, Fig. 1, times 
the thickness of the wall. The length 
of the vessel having already been 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



41 



stated to be 168 inches between points 
1 to 4, the combined length from points 
1 to 4, and points 2 to 3, is twice 168 
inches, or 336 inches. The thickness of 
the wall of the vessel being f-inch and 
the tensile strength of the plate being 
53,000 pounds, then the resisting force 
is : 
336 x f x 55,000 equals 6,930,000 lbs. 
Since the longitudinal seamless plane 
has a resisting force of 6,930,000 pounds 
and the total force acting on said plane 
is 1,108,800 pounds, the ratio between 
the ultimate strength and the acting 
force is : 

6,930,000 

equals 6.25 

1,108,800 
The calculations in the foregoing par- 
agraphs brought out that the force act- 
ing on the transverse plane amounted 
to 342,100 pounds, being resisted by a 
force of 4,301,000 pounds, therefore, the 
ratio between the ultimate strength 
and the working pressure i9 : 

4,301,000 

equals 12.5 

342,100 
Examination shows that the trans- 
verse load is approximately one-half the 
longitudinal load, and, accordingly the 
ratio between the ultimate strength and 



/ 




Fig. 4.- 

the applied load on the transverse plane 
is about twice the ratio between the 
ultimate strength and the applied load 
on the longitudinal plane. 
Longitudinal and Girth Seams lc 

(4) Prominent among the many pro- 
blems which arise in designing a steam 
boiler is that of the arrangement of the 
courses and riveted joints. Very few 
vessels are made seamless, and, accord- 
ingly the rings or courses composing the 
vessel must be connected together in 
some manner. 

This is accomplished by the installa- 
tion of rivet holes in the plates and 
then securing the plates to one another 
by over-lapping and riveting, or by 
butting the plates and securing them by 
butt or welt straps riveted to the ends 
of the plates. 

In Fig. 2 is shown a course of a boiler 
as it would appear when rolled approx- 
imately into shape, and no> holes in- 
stalled for the seams. The calculations 
for a seamless course brought out that 
the vessel was twice as strong through 
the transverse plane as the longitudinal 
plane, and for this reason the designer 



can make the girth seam a, Fig. 3, 
single-riveted, while the longitudinal 
seam must be made double-riveted, or 
triple-riveted, and with a high-pressure 
boiler the longitudinal seam is made a 
triple-riveted butt double-strapped joint 
with the outer, row of rivets in single 




Fig. 5.- 

shear, all as shown at the longitudinal 
seam b, Fig. 3. 

The installation of the rivet holes 
does not make it possible to make the 
boiler at the longitudinal seam as 
strong at that point as the solid plate 
elsewhere in the longitudinal plane. The 
strength of the longitudinal joint will 
depend upon the type of riveted joint 
and the size and pitch of the rivets. 
The solid plate is to be considered as 100 
per cent., and this is the case irrespec- 
tive of the thickness of the plate, or its 
tensile strength. 

Since the longitudinal seam is less 
than 100 per cent., and it is necessary 
when computing the working pressure 
to consider the strength or the efficiency 
of the longitudinal seam, the following 
formula, which is used by most author- 
ities for ascertaining the allowable 
working pressure of a vessel, is given : 

Where : 
TS equals tensile strength of plate in 

Pounds. 
T equals thickness of plate in ir.ches. 
D equals diameter of boiler in inches. 
F equals factor of safety. 
A equals allowable working pressure per 

square inch. 

TS x T x 2 x E 

equals A 

D x F 

Factor of Safety 

(5) It is not advisable to work a boiler 
or any other structure at or near its 
ultimate strength. There should be con- 




siderable difference between the ultimate 
strength and the allowable working 
pressure. The ratio between the two 
is called the factor of safety, and in 
boiler construction the minimum factor 



of safety allowed by ,nost authorities 
is 4. 

The factor of safety cannot be .set. in 
an off-hand manner ; it must be decided 
by the circumstances of the case. Thus 
a boiler having a ll holes drilled in place 
and constructed with a double-strapped 
butt joint, will— and justly so--be al- 
lowed a lower factor of safety than a 
boiler of like size and design, but with 
the holes punched. 

Many of the authorities nave estab- 
lished the minimum factor of safely at 
4, and then add to it certain amounts 
in accordance with the type of riveted 
joint and the grade of workmanship. 
Such rules and regulations encourage 
good design and workmanship. 

A high factor of safety does not indi- 
cate that the boiler is better construct- 
ed than a like boiler with a lower factor 
of safety. The minimum factor of 
safety should not be less than 4— and a 
boiler properly designed and constructed 
with a factor of safety of 4 is a safer 
boiler than one poorly designed and con- 
structed with a factor of safety of 6. 
The Hydr- static Test. 
(6) Merely because a steam boiler 
withstands a given hydrostatic or cold 
water test, it is no sign that the boiler 
is safe. The test itself, if improperly" 
"applied— that is, an excessive pressure 
applied, will injure the boiler. The elas- 
tic limit of the steel, which is about 50 
per cent, of the ultimate strength of 
the plate, must be taken into consider- 
ation. 

The elastic limit means the point 
where the applied load begins to pro- 
duce a permanent elongation. Up to 
that point the metal will yield slightly, 
but when the load is removed the metal 
will return to its original length. It is 
never safe to place a load on any struc- 
ture beyond this point. A boiler con- 
structed for a working pressure of 100 
pounds steam pressure per square inch, 
faetor of safety of 5, would burst a t ap- 
proximately 500 pounds pressure per 
square inch, but the danger point would 
be reached at approximately 250 pounds 
(or the elastic limit) if the square of 
the section of plate in the longitudinal 
seam is equal to the shearing strength 
of the rivets. 

This is assuming that the efficiency f 
the riveted joint is determined by the 
plate, maximum net section of plate, 
and the efficiency of the rivets exceeds 
the latter to some extent. With a fac- 
tor of safety of 4, the boiler will show 
signs of distress at 200 pounds pressure, 
for as soon as the elastic limit of the 
plate is reached the plate begins to re- 
duce in area, consequently a loss of 
strength ensues which cannot be regain- 
ed. 

It must not be assumed that a boiler 
constructed for 100 pounds pressure, 



42 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



factor of safety of 4, will be able to 
sustain a hydrostatic pressure of 200 
pounds per square inch without serious 
and permanent injury to the plates. The 
hydrostatic test should at all times be 
less than the clastic limit, and a cold 
water test of one and one-half times the 
allowable steam working pressure is 
ample. 

Number of Courses in a Boiler Shell. 
(7) In the earlier days the designer was 
forced to give consideration to the size 
of plates obtainable. With the intro- 
duction of larger and heavier machinery 
in the rolling mills, plates are now- 
made of greater thickness and length 
and width than formerly, and, accord- 
ingly the number of sections or courses 
now composing a steam boiler are fewer 
than before. 

The steam pressure per square inch of 
steam boiler has increased gradually in 
late years, and this with the changes in 
the plates has caused the whole field of 
boiler designing and boiler constructing 
to undergo marked changes within the 
past fifteen years. 

The number of courses to be used in a 
horizontal tubular boiler is a question 
upon which boiler designers are not all 
of the same opinion. Some have ad- 
vocated making large tubular boilers of 
one course. This is the practice for the 
shells of small size tanks and air drums 
and like structures, and has given sat- 
isfactory results, but the one course 
large size boiler has been anything but 
a success, and for reasons which will be 
hereinafter given. 

Others have advocated constructing 
horizontal tubular boilers with a lone: 



bottom course and several upper courses 
as shown in Fig. .4. There i9 no advan- 
tage in this form of construction in re- 
gards to the costs of manufacture. This 
plan of construction is used principally 
with large tanks, such as used by rail- 
roads for transporting oil. Vessels of 
this design have given satisfaction in 
the foregoing field, but what few boilers 
of this design, where the shell is in con- 
tact w T ith the flames and hot gases, have 
been a source of trouble almost from 
the day they were installed. 

The majority of boiler manufacturers 
are now constructing tubular boilers 
with either two or three courses. The 
tendency is to favor the two-course 
boiler. This is due to the fact that a 
two-course tubular boiler can be con- 
structed somewhat cheaper than a three- 
course boiler. The boiler manufacturer 
in order to meet the demands for boil- 
ers at low figures, naturally, designs 
and constructs the type which has the 
lowest first costs. 

While the purchaser desires to pur- 
chase everything as cheaply as possible, 
which fact has been deeply impressed 
upon the mind of the manufacturers, the 
purchaser should take into considera- 
tion the whole field and not merely first 
costs. 

The three-course tubular boiler as 
shown in Fig. 5, is favored as thegiith 
seams a and b stiffen the shell sheet, 
while the stiffening- of a two-course 
boiler as shown in Fig. 6, is only one- 
half that of the three-course boiler. Of 
the above respective types of boilers, 
experience has shown that a two-course 



boiler with long longitudinal seams is 
not as satisfactory as a three-course 
boiler with short longitudinal seam, and 
as a general rule a three course boiler 
is more durable than a two-course 
boiler. 

There is also another point in favor 
of the three-course boiler. The girth 
seam of a three-course boiler is well 
away from the bridge wall, the same 
being indicated in Fig. 5, while the 
girth seam of a two-course boiler is di- 
rectly over the bridge wall, the same 
being indicated in Fig. 6. With a three- 
course boiler the impinging flame strikes 
the shell sheet at about the point a, 
Fig. 5, while with a two-course boiler 
the impinging flame strikes the shell 
sheet at or near the girth seam a,. 
Fig. 6. 

While it is true that the girth seam 
b of a three-course boiler is directly 
over the furnace — and this is not the 
case with a two-course boiler — the girth 
seam b, Fig. 5, does not come in con- 
tact with the impinging flame as does 
the girth seam a, Fig. 6. 

The foregoing considerations are up- 
permost in the minds of boiler design- 
ers when designing tubular boilers. In 
addition thereto comes the question of 
repairs. It has been found that a two- 
course boiler is more liable to bag from 
scale, mud and grease than a three- 
course boiler, and further when trouble 
of this character arises, a three-course 
boiler tends to prevent the bag from 
spreading over a great distance, and 
accordingly the repairing is usually less 
with a three-course boiler than a tw r o- 
course boiler. 



Machining a Flexible Joint for the Toronto Intake Pipe 

The Variation in Levels, Where the Intake Pijx Extension is Being Laid at Toronto, Neces- 
sitates the Changing of Direction by Using Bail and Socket Joints. The Machining of 
Tin st Lin-tjr, Flexible Joint* is an Interesting Problem Which was Solved hy the Can- 
ada Foundry, Toronto. 



'TpHK intake for Toronto water sup- 
ply etxends on! into Lake Ontario. 
For some time trouble has arisen from 
sand and brushwood collecting around 
the mouth of the intake. The Toronto 
Board of Control and Council were im- 
ed with the idea thai purer water 
could lie obtained farther out in the 
lake and that the above troubles could 
be eliminated. 

City Engineer Rusl and Assistant 
Engineer Fellowa were instructed to ex- 
tend the intake 500 feet. The extension 
had to be made in deep water and the 
pipe laid on a varying level of lake bed. 
The extension lias therefore created a 
number of problems to be solved. 

One of these problems was to make 



provision for the change in direction of 
the pipe due to the difference in levels. 
For this purpose it was decided to use 
two ball and socket joints. The ball 
and joint must fit perfectly, otherwise 
a leak would result. The machining of 
these joints was therefore a very fine 
pieee of work, necessitating absolute 
accuracy. Two joints were made to fit 
in between three sections of pipe, each 
L68 feel long, 7'J inches diameter. The 
plate used was 5-8 inches thick, chan- 
nel riveted to east steel flanges and 
turned to suit the radius of the bearing. 
Fi'_'. 1 shows the finished ball joint. 

The contract for the flexible joints 
was given to the Canada Foundry Co.. 
Toronto, and Mr. Loach, the superin- 



tendent devised the plan of machining 
the work. This taxed the machinery to 
a certain extent. It was finally accom- 
plished on a large locomotive wheel 
lathe built by the John Bertram & Suns 
Co., Dundas. 

Operations. 

The machine operations on the ball 
joint were as follows: 

(1) The casting which is 7 ft. •'! in. 
outside diameter finished, was put. on a 
10 ft. boring mill, bored and faced on 
outside and given a roughing cut to re- 
move uneven metal. 

(2) ft was sent to the boiler shop .and 
riveted onto piping with flange. This 
piping was short length and steel flange 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



A 'A 



made it easy to hold the casting or the 
face plate of the wheel lathe. 

(3) The rigging was composed of a 
hall-bearing turntable ordinarily used 
for heavy drill press work, fastened in 
I lie exact centre of the lathe underneath 
the casting; a bar connected the turntable 
with the tool post which was removed 
from original fittings and placed on a 
surface plate. A screw feed attach- 
ment for moving tool post on a perfect 
radius resulted in an excellent job and 
an exact circular surface. 

Mechanism Explained. 

The tool post rested on the surface 
plate A, Fig. 2, and was connected to a 
ball bearing centre by the rod J, thus 
making a solid connection between the 
two. The tool post was fastened to a 
plate with a lug E. The ratchet D was 
fastened to the screw B. By operating 
the ratchet, the tool post resting on the 
shoes F, was drawn towards the lug (' 
which was permanently fixed to the sur- 
face plate. 

The casting has a steel pipe fastened 
to it. This pipe has a flange by which 
it was bolted in the lathe as shown at 
H. On account of the weight of the 
ball joint, it was braced from the face 
plate shown on the right of the illus- 
tration. Four braces were used, being 
fastened solidly by means of turn- 
buckles as shown at H. This arrange- 
ment prevented any moving of the work 
during the machining operations. The 
result was a perfect ball joint. 



I | liiM'Rivcu iy'in"* abi 



PERSONAL. 

Geo. D. Leacock has been appointed 
travelling representative for the Pack- 
ard Electric Co. for the territory be- 
tween Kingston and the Soo. His head- 
quarters will be in Toronto. 
» * * 

Laurence T. Walls, of the Dominion 
Wire Mfg. Co., Montreal, has accepted a 
position in the Winnipeg office of the 
Steel Co. of Canada, as assistant to Mr. 
Banna, manager of the Northwest sales 
branch of the Steel Co. 

* * # 
•T. T. Brower, manager and engineer 
of the Structural Steel Co.. Longue 
Point, will become general manager of 
the National Bridge Co., of Montreal. 
He will take charge of the National 
Bridge Co. on March 1. 
, * * * 

Thos. Moore has been appointed man- 
ager of the Belleville Rolling Mills. 
which is a branch of the Steel Co. of 
Canada. Mr. Moore was connected with 
this firm shortly after it started in busi- 
ness, but resigned to take position of 
salesman with the Canada Screw Co., 
Hamilton. 




Fig. ] — Flexible Toint, Designed by the To ronto Waterworks Department for 

Intake Extension. 



the 




Fip. 2 A Ball Joint made at the Canada Foundry, Toronto, for the Toronto Water, 

Supply Intake. 



MACHINE SHOP METHODS \ DEVICES 

Unique Ways of Doing Things in the Machine Shop. Readers' Opinions 
Concerning Shop Practice. Data for Machinists. Contributions paid for. 



TURNING DIE SECTIONS OF 

LARGE RADII. 

By J. H. Rodgers. 

The accompanying sketch shows an at- 
tachment placed on a gap lathe for the 
purpose of turning the portion of a 
circle of large radius, as found on a 
blanking die for pail or tub sections, 
and other similar work, within the 
range of the attachment. 

The large bracket A is secured to the 
bed of the lathe B in such a position 
that the back of the plate P rides on 
the surface of the face plate F. 

The plate P is kept in contact with 
the face plate F by the pin P and the 
block L. At the rear of the plate P 
is secured a bracket K, which carries 
one end of the shaft S, the other end 
passing through the swivel block R, 
which is free to turn in tfie piece H. 
H can be secured in the slot as shown 
to suit the radius being turned as a — b. 

The pin P is secured to the face plate 
in a position that gives the desired 



cleaner, quicker, and gives better results 
than the ordinary fluted reamer; does 
not bind, and can be sharpened in a few 
minutes on an ordinary flat emery 
wheel, and saves toolroom time by do- 





Taper Dowel Hole lleaiuer. 



ing away with the necessity of having 
an experienced toolmaker grind it. 

The tool is made from 1^ inch round 
stock; the shank being turned to fit 
machine spindle, the body turned to re- 
quired taper and milled out to f-in. 
thickness, leaving a 1-in. diameter turned 
pilot end, to steady the tool in opera- 
tion, and ensure a true hole. The cut- 




Xurnlng Dip Sections of Large Radii. 



travel to the work W, which is fastened 
to the plate P. 

As the lathe spindle revolves it gives 
an up and down motion to the work, 
similar to the action of a shaper, only 
the tool is stationary, while the work 
is in motion. 

TAPER DOWEL HOLE REAMER. 
By L. R. Brown. 

The sketch and description refers to a 
tool used in the C P.R. Angus shops, 
Montreal, for reaming taper dowel plug 
holes in locomotive driving box crown 
brasses It is cheaper to make, cuts 



ting edges are filed to give the neces- 
sary cutting clearance, and these only 
should be ground. 

GETTING GOOD WORK FROM 

"SHAKY" VISE; 

By G. B. Marquette. 

Most of us have experienced trouble in 
getting a block or key which is to be 
held between the jaws of the vise to lay 
flat on the parallel bars A, just as the 
movable jaw tightens on the job, the 
slackness in the jaw lifts the piece of 
work. Time after time the vise is 
slackened and tightened, again. It would 



not be hammered down. Time is being 
wasted for the machine stands idle. 
Take a piece of §-in. rod, insert between 
the movable jaw of the vise and the 
work and tighten. Instead of the slack- 
ness in the jaw lifting our work, the 




• letting Good Work from Shaky Vise. 

piece of -jj-in. round will accommodate 
itself to the movement of the jaw and 
roll slightly, leaving our piece of work 
perfectly flat, and upon the top face be- 
ing machined will be found to be per- 
fectly parallel. 



TO SAW SHEET IRON OR PIPE. 

By G. B. Marquette. 
In the machine shop we frequently 
have to make a template of sheet iron, 
and in order that we may not distort 
the material we are obliged to use a 
hack saw. Immediately we attempt to 
use it, we are in trouble, for the thin 
sheet iron just drops between two of the 
teeth and stops there. To get over the 
difficulty simply reverse the saw blade 
in the frame and proceed in the usual 
way. It will neither catch or break, 
and cuts just as well. 



RUSSELL AUTOMOBILE BRAKE. 

The construction of an automobile 
brake is not very generally understood. 
The ones shown in Fig. 1 and used on 
the Russell cars, manufactured by the 
Canada Cycle & Motor Co., Toronto, 
will therefore be of interest. 

In the end view, the moving element 
is shown hatched. In an automobile 
brake there are two main considerations, 
namely, lightness nnd positiveness of 
action, particularly the latter feature, 
as such a brake must never fail to work- 
when required. For this reason, each 
brake has two clutches, the ordinary, 
nnd the emergency. 

The outer brake shoe is part of the 
"ordinary" equipment. It is put in 
operation by moving to the right the 
lever 6649 (shown to the extreme right 
of the out.) This tends to bring closer 
together pins 3012 and 1188, tightening 









CANADIAN MACHINERY 



45 



the brake on the outside of the moving 
shell. When the brake is released, 
spring 5918 separates the two elements 
of the brake shoe, which are hinged on 
the far side. As this brake is in con- 
stant use, the friction face wears, loos- 
ening the brake on the moving element, 
necessitating a further movement of 
the brake lever to tighten the brake. For 
that reason it is made adjustable for 
wear by threading the bolt connecting 
the two halves of the brake, as shown. 
Customarily in most brakes, a nut and 
jam nut are employed, requiring a jour- 
ney under the car each time adjust- 
ment is needed. The Russell car uses 
a simple contrivance to overcome this, 
using the lock nut shown at 5921, and 
more clearly in Fig. 2. The connecting 
bolt passes through a hole in pin 3012, 
and the lock nut, which has its face 
rounded out, conforms to this surface, 
and is positively held in the one position 
by the spring holding it there. This 
permits of only half turn adjustment, 
which meets requirements. 

For emergency purposes, there is an 
inner clutch, as shown, and which is of 
a much more positive nature. It consists 
of a toggle joint operated by lever 6321 
(shown dotted inside view.) The shov- 
ing to the right of link 797, creates a 
tremendous outward pressure of the 
brake on the moving element, stopping 
it almost instantly if applied with suf- 
ficient force. It is also adjustable as 



shown by a small turnbuckle threaded 
tight and left hand. A spring 6585, 
holds the shoes out of position when 




Fig. 2 — External Brake Adjuster. 

not required. It is not adjustable, as 
this is unnecessary, the brake being only 
put in commission in cases of emer- 
gency. 

WORM GEAR OILER. 

One of the most difficult pieces to keep 
properly lubricated, is the worm ^ear 
on a vertical shaft, for there is nothing 
to retain the oil or grease like there is 
when it is placed horizontally. This has 
been the experience of Wm. Kennedy & 
Sons, Owen Sound, who have improvis- 
ed the simply device shown in the ac- 
companying sketch, to overcome lubri- 
cation difficulties of worm gears on ver- 
tical shafts. The fixture consists of a 
shell A in which are paddles B, on shaft 
C, which is supported in cast bearings, 
projecting from shell A. The box A is 



placed directly beneath the worm to be 
lubricated, in such a way that the teeth 
of B, mesh with the worm teeth. Of 
course, B must be made specially for 
different worm pitches. The space E is 
filled with a semi-fluid grease, which is 
lifted up into contact with the worm 
as each tooth of B rises. The grease 
must be semi-fluid to insure the space 
around B being always filled. 

There are two wheels B, one placed 
slightly behind the other, as shown in 
the plan view, thus giving pitch to the 
oil wheels, to match the worm. The 
whole device, while very simple and 
crude, meets the requirements extremely 




Worm Gear Oiler. 

well. Gears examined after long use, 
showed practically no wear, whereas, 
before using this method, the wear was 
quite considerable. 




Fig. 1— An Effective Automatic Brake used on Russell Cars, Canada Cycle & Motor Co.. Toronto. 



4i> 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



SHOP KINKS. 
By M B. D. 

Soft-soldering is not considered a verj 
mechanical way ol fastening machine 
parts, but it sometimes helps one out 
ol a difficulty in a surprising manner. 
Over a year ago the writer had the job 
of repairing a lathe on which the mam 
driving gear was loose on the spindle 
The spindle was hollow, and so thin 
that it did not furnish a Hood support 
lor the ke\ The gear, spindle. ke\- 
seat, and key were cleaned and carefulh 
tinned They were then heated hot 
enough to melt the solder, and were as- 
sembled The lathe has been in hard 
service ever since, and the gear is still 
perfectly tight. 

A verj satisfactory extension drill 
ma] he had by taking a piece of iron or 
brass pipe, whose internal diameter 
equals that of the hole to be drilled, 
and with a crosspeen hammer make two 
dents directly opposite each other and 
about 1\ inches from one end. Into this 
pipe drive the twist drill, after having 
ground the end (hit. This is a very good 
way of driving taps also. 

In many small shops the screw mach- 
ine and other tools are finish-ground on 
copper laps. These laps are about lb 
inches in diameter by about A inch 
thick, and are mounted on the same 
spindle as the emery wheel. The lap is 
easily charged in the usual way by us- 
ing a hardened steel roller and rolling 
the abrasive into it. Tools finish- 
sharpened in this way will do much bet- 
ter work, and will last much longer. 

To drill a large hole dean from the 
start without jumping or chattering in 
tne least, take a small piece of old rag 
or waste about the size of the end of 
the drill; place it under the point of 
the drill, and then drill through the rag 
or waste. This idea may be used to fa 
great advantage in countersinking work 
which requires a clean finish. 

MACHINING RUDDER STEM. 

The accompanying sketch is the steel 
frame ol a large rudder being made for 
a bos feet long, at the works of 

the Collingwood Shipbuilding Co., Col- 
lingwood, On1 It is about 21 feet long, 
and nearh 10 feet wide, and when com- 
pleter] will be covered on both sides with 
boiler plate. 

The machining of the bottom tip \ ol 
the rudder presented a problem, ,or the 
largest lathe in the shop had only an 
ix ft bed. and 18-in. swing, vhile a 
swing ol 

if the article was to be turned -i the 
usual manner The tip, itself, is onlj 
'>l inches diameter by W\ inches long 
The difficulty was overcome as i lows : 
The rudder was jacked up on its flat side 
on the carriage of the lathe \ cross 
tool was secured to the face plate, ai.d 



after adjusting, the carriage feed was 
put on, feeding the work up onto it, 





Rudder to be Machined. 



thereby doing the work. A very neat 
and accurate job was produced in this 
way. The other end B was completed 
on the planer. 

FERRULE ROLLER. 

Chas. Barber & Sons, Meaford, Ont., 
have a neat little device, which they im- 
provised recently to make the ferrules 
shown at A in the accompanying sketch. 
Large numbers of these are required as 
spacers in the guard racks made for 
their turbine installations. 

The device consists of a body, B as 
shown. The shaft C, has a long handle 
I) on the end for twisting, while the 
other end is formed as a crank with 



the desired throw. The crank pin has a 
hardened steel roller E on it. In the 
same line as the shaft is pin F, the 
inner end G being of the desired size of 
the inside of the ferrule. H is a clamp- 
ing screw. 

The stock, l"xj" band iron, is cut 
the desired length, and one end of the 
piece placed between clamp II and pin 
(!, after the shaft C has been turned to 
its highest position, the roller being 
thus over the ferrule blank. After 
clamping H, shaft C is revolved, the 
roller E bending the stock to the shape 
of the pin G. Pin F can then be with- 
drawn, this action removing the ferrule, 
leaving ready for the next. A boy can 
produce over a thousand in a dav. 



INSERTED CUTTER TAPS AND DIES 

The uses to which high-speed steel has 
been put are numerous, in the metal 
working industries especially. Follow- 
ing the trend of development, Robt. 
Dryden, toolmaker for Sheldons' Ltd , 
Gait, has gotten out for use in the 
works, the tap and die shown in Figs. 
1 and 2 respectively, wherein a minimum 
of high-speed steel has been made to do 
maximum duty. 

The tap shown in Fig. 1 consists es- 
sentially of a machinery steel body A, 
on which the collar D is turned, and 
which has the four longtitudinal flutes 
as shown, the flute passing down through 
collar D as well as into the main part 
of the body. The split collar C is 
threaded corresponding to the thread of 
the tap, and can be tightened down by 
the side set screws. This collar, being 
faced off squarely, bears against the 
collar D on the body, and holds the 
chasers in alignment, and prevents 
cross-threads. Heavy working does not 
tend to put them out of position, but 
the reverse. The chasers are made in a 
solid arbor, into slots in which, they 
are tapped, eight at a time. It will be 
noticed that the slots in body A are so 
made that the cutting face is perpendicu- 
lar. In order to back off the chasers, 
the grooves .in the cutting arbor, are 




Purrule Roller. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



47 



oH-set slightly, so that the back is cut 
deeper than the front, so no backing-ofi 
attachment to the lathe is necessary. 
Fig. 2 shows the inserted cutter prin- 




Fig. 1 — Inserted Cutter Tap. 

ciple applied to a die used for thread- 
ing pipe plugs, etc. As before, the body 
A is soft steel, with high-speed steel 




chasers E, held in position by collar B. 
To keep the alignment, a centre pin C 
is threaded, and has a tip D which cen- 
trally locates both chasers E, and pin 
C. Set screws in collar B adjust the 
chasers in, as desired. 

One of the noticeable features' is the 
method of lubrication. An annular chan- 
nel F in collar B has several holes lead- 
ing down from it to the face of the 
chasers, feeding the cutting fluid down 
on the cutting edges at all times. 

The really valuable feature about both 
tap and die, is the longevity, for both 
will last an indefinite period. In all 
thread cutting tools, it is at the tip 
that the heaviest cutting occurs, caus- 
ing the greatest wear at that point. In 
these inserted chaser tools, the tips can 
be ground off, and the chasers lowered 
a tooth, making them as good as new. 

FLEXIBLE COUPLING. 

The accompanying sketch is of a flex- 
ible coupling used by the Canada Gas 
Power and Producer Co., Barrie, Ont., 



ed oil and four ounces of turpentine into 
the glue pot, and in this dissolve three 
ounces of resin. When the resin is dis- 
solved, add the glue. The resin and 
glue should be well stirred while dis- 
solving. 

Before applying the leather cover to 
a pulley have it warm and dry, and 
scrape off all matter that may have ac- 
cumulated on its face. Then with a 
swab, apply muriatic acid (full 
strength) to all parts of the face of the 
pulley. When dry, wipe gently with 
waste. Cut leather lengthwise of hide, 
and a little wider than the face of the 
pulley. Have the cement melted in the 
glue pot, apply it across the face of the 
pulley, with a brush, for about six or 
eight inches, lay on the end of leather 
and rub it down hard with the corner of 
a piece of wood. Fold back the leather 
and continue to apply cement until the 
pulley is covered. Two thicknesses of 
leather are used. Make the first thick- 
ness a butt joint, and the last a scarf or 
lap joint of about three or four inches 




Flexible Coupling. 



Pig. 2 -Inserted Cutter Die. 



for direct-connecting their gas engines 
to generators. 

The coupling A is attached directly 
to the crank shaft, while B is on the 
generator shaft. It will be noticed that 
the arrangement consists of these two 
couplings, with pins, such as that shown 
at C, projecting inward, alternately 
from each one. For example, pin C, pro- 
jects from A, and is free in a larger 
elongated hole in B, so that B may move 
up or down, etc., within limits, without 
fouling A. The next pin projects from 
B into A, and so on. Between these pins 
.ire leather links D, through which A 
drives B. This has proved to be an ex- 
cellent coupling. 

HOLDING LEATHER ON IRON 

PULLEYS. 

By R. F. Williams. 

First soak twelve ounces of good glue 
in cold water. Put four ounces of boil- 



long. Make the laps on the driven pul- 
leys the way they should run, and on 
the drivers the opposite way. Pulleys 
should be cleaned by holding a piece of 
coarse sand paper against them. 



HACK-SAW ATTACHMENT FOR 
LATHES. 

By H. D. Chapman. 

The accompanying drawing shows the 
way in which a hack-saw can be attach- 
ed to a lathe. This will be found very 
handy about a small shop, and is inex- 
pensive and simple in its construction. 
The device is so constructed that it can 
be easily put on and taken off the lathe. 

The saw and its parts are mounted 
on a 1-inch thick by 8-inch wide cast iron 
slab; this makes the device easy to use 
on any lathe. The device consists of 
slide bar A, and two supports on each 
end. B and C, which are to guide the bar 



18 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



. bar 1> i- i" brace the saw frame and 
. ep it from turning. 
Tlu' slide is a Bat piece of machine 
bteel 5-16 inch thick and 2 Inches wide; 
th is aboui 1 feet, or to suit 
A hole is drilled in the 
slide bar A tor a 5-16 inch bolt. This 
o hold the connecting rod E. 
Tlic supports I". and (' arc mail.' of 
1-inch square stock. The support B has 
turned ami threaded i" -nil a 
.•ji tapped hole w hich is in t he casl 
ii, ,n base 1'. The support C i- bolted 
,1 ,,t base, as show n. Each 
support has a ">-lt> in. slo< cul through the 
pentCT, so as to allow a neat slidil 
slide liar A. 

The guide 1 1 i- made of 5-16-inch by 
1-inch machine steel. One end of guide 






» --- & 



T? F 1 




LTM 



II k Saw Attachment for Lathes. 

is bolted to saw frame, allowing the other 
end to slide through support B, thus 
enting the saw from having any 
wabble. 

The connecting rod E is a strip of 

... ilai steel about 2 inches wide and 

i Mi io -nit the saw frame. The 

ecting rod is also bolted to the face 

plate of th»' lathe,, as shown in the cut, 

and can be adjusted in the slot of the 

plate; this adjustment will accom- 

i of the saw. 

ae is made of machine 

. and the saw i- made tight in the. 

e by means of a thumb-screw, as 

ttd of the frame. 

ichine vise is (damped 

to t' i- holds the stock 

in'/ off. This hack-saw fixture 

of the lathe. 

; a position with a 

<■ American. 



Correspondence 

lefi appearing in 
Canadian Machinery will In- cheerfully 
welcomed and let! 

idea- will be paid for. 

• rmation regardii 
of vario with their addi 

will be supplied either thro : 

columns or by letter, on request. Ad- 
dress Letters to Canadian Machinery, 
143-149 University Ave.. Toronto. — 

Editor. 



Tapping Hole Straight. 

One of the questions asked a C.P.R. 
apprentice on a recent examination was: 
I low can you tell whether a tap is going 
m straight or not, if the hole being tap- 
ped passed through the centre of a 
sphere? Perhaps readers of Canadian 
Machinery would have some ideas. — 

Reader. 

Bolt Hole Facing Tool. 

In the article "A Day's Ramble 
Through the M.C.R. Shops at St. 
Thomas,'* December issue, 1910, a des- 
cription is given on page 39 of a Bolt 
Hole facing Tool shown in the attached 
drawing. Fig. 1. The article states, "In 



.Mr. (Inllow, in his lecture, pointed out 
in the commencement that a life might 
often he saved by the possession of a 
little intelligent, first-aid knowledge on 
the part of the by-stander. Illustrating 
his argument by little narratives of real 
accidents, Mr. Gidlow proceeded: 

"The case of possible death by 
drowning demands special attention. 
[gnorant and careless handling of the 
supposed victim by drowning lias often 
unwittingly completed the work of suffo- 
cation by immersion, and one can real- 
ize what this means in this country, 
where an average of seven hundred 




Bolt Hole Facing Tool. 



place of being keyed in the usual man- 
ner, the centre hole is bored flat on one 
side, and the bar itself flattened to cor- 
respond. Will you kindly explain how 
the cutter is "bored flat?" — Novice. 

The hole in the cutter blank which is 
made of high speed steel, is first drilled 
with a 1 in. drill. The blank is then 



drowning accidents occur every year. 
"First aid is a branch of work en- 
tirely different from that of the sur- 
geon. It is special, and differs from 
the special training which every stu- 
dent receives. The medical student is 
taught to use all the best and most 
approved methods, while the first aid 



r 








i 








L 


. ->■? 




__r~ 1 1 






e£ 



Fig. 2— Bolt Hole Facing Tool, "Blank Drift." 



heated and the drift shown in Fig. 2 is 
driven through, thus leaving a flat side 
in the hole. The blank is then put on 
a mandrel and machined. This will no 
doubt satisfactorily explain the meaning 
intended by the words "bored flat." 



WINNIPEG RAILWAY CLUB. 

At a recent meeting of the Western 
Canada Railway Club, Winnipeg, S. A. 
Gidlow, general secretary of St. John 
Anihul nice Association, C.P.R., Montreal, 
read a paper on "First Aid to the In- 
jured." There were several practical 
demonstrations of ways of rendering 
"first and." These, which were super- 
ded by J. T. Warde, G. D. Lock- 
harl ami Dr. Moorehead, showed meth- 
ods of immediate treatment of: a com- 
pound fracture of the thigh; a broken 
bone and fracture of the forearm, 
Such as would likely follow a street car 

accident ; and hemorrhage in different 

parts of the body. Also there was illus- 
trated the right way to lift and carry 
a wounded man, and the Schafrer, La- 
bord and Sylvester methods of inducing 

respiration. 



si udent is taught to use whatever is 
nearest to hand in the most scientific 
way possible. He must make a band- 
age out of a neck-tie or a handkerchief. 
He must improvise a tourniquet from a 
belt or a brace; for splints he must uti- 
lize a stick, a rifle, an umbrella or fold- 
ed newspapers, and construct a stretch- 
er out of a couple of broom handles and 
coats." 

Mr. Gidlow explained the course of 
instruction in detail. The first three 
lectures dealt respectively with the 
bones, circulation and nervous system; 
and the fourth and fifth with methods 
of rendering first aid and of carrying 
the injured. As soon as the lectures 
were finished, the men were taken in 
hand by one of the company's ambul- 
ance instructors, and taught the prac- 
tical work. Test questions were put to 
the classes before they were allowed to 
go up for examination. 

In conclusion Mr. Gidlow told of the 
classes organized along the different 
divisions of the C.P.R., totalling 51 
classes and consisting of 1,607 men. 



DEVELOPMENTS IN MACHINERY 

New Machinery for Machine Shop, Foundry, Pattern Shop, Planing 
Mill ; New Engines, Boilers, Electrical Machinery, Transmission Device*. 



HEAVY DUTY ENGINE LATHE. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
;i general view and details til* a '21 inch 
heavy-duty engine lathe recently placed 
on the market. This is one size of a line 
of lathes of the same type, including 
17, 19, 21, 25, 27, 30 and .TS inch, lathes. 
The principle on which these machines 
have been designed has been to furnish 
a tool capable of taking a given cut and 
removing a given number of cubic in- 
ches of metal per minute. The 21 inch 
lathe shown is capable of taking a cut 
1 i inch, deep with a feed of 1-b' inch at 
a cutting speed of 65 feet per minute, in 
50-poin! carbon steel. This is equal to 
removing 32 cubic inches of metal per 
minute. 

The head stock is of the LeBlond im- 
proved drop brace pattern and is se- 
curely fastened to the bed with bolts 
of large size. The three-step cone pul- 
ley in conjunction with the double fric- 
tion back gears and a two-speed counter 
shaft, provide in all, eighteen changes 
of spindle speeds, covering a range 
carefully selected for the purpose of the 
machine. The spindle is hollow ami 
made of high carbon hammered steel, 
and is hardened and ground at the 
front and rear journals. These latter 
are carried in cast iron boxes scraped 
to a good bearing fit. This type of 
bearing the builders consider preferable 



because it does not require intricate oil- 
ing devices with continual attention on 
part of the operator; yet the lubrication 
is well taken care of. The bearing stan- 
dards are cored out to form large oil 
chambers which are tilled from the 
trout of the lathe; from these the oil 
is fed to the bearings by means of felt 
pads. This construction eliminates all 
possibility of grit and dirt entering 
the bearings, and reduces the attention 
required to filling the oil receptacle 
once a week. 

The tail stock is of massive design 
with a bearing of ample length on the 
bed. The tail-spindle barrel is designed 
in such a manner as to give the maxi- 
mum length of bearing combined with 
long travel. Screws are provided for 
setting over the tail-stock for taper 
Work, the base being graduated so that 
this setting can be easily accomplished. 

A new departure has been followed 
in the design af the bed. The tail-stock 
slides on a V of the usual proportions 
on the rear way. and on a flat surface 
in the front. The carriage travels 
on a flat surface in the back, 
as shown, and is held down in the 
back by a flat gib. The front of 
the carriage slides on a guide of dif- 
ferent shape from that usually found in 
engine lathes. This guide, as shown, is 
V shaped, but is machined at an angle 



ol l.~> degrees on the front side, ami 70 
degrees on the back, making the total 
included angle L)5 degrees. 

The carriage is held in alignment on 
a scraped Surface on the front of the 
bed by taper gibs at both end bearings. 
This construction together with the 70- 
degree angle on the back of the V over- 
comes any tendency of the carriage to 
(limb the ways when the lathe is en- 
gaged on heavy work. The gibs are 
tongued in position in the carriage, and 
in combination with the special con- 
struction of the Y, they automatically 
compensate for the wear; this makes 
it unnecessary to give any attention to 
the adjustment of the gibs. Wipers are 
provided, fitted with felt pads, which 
in addition to wiping off chips and grit 
from the sliding surfaces also provides 
for automatic oiling of the ways. 

The lathe spindle is set back a cer- 
tain distance (in this size of lathe, two 
inches) from the centre of the shears, 
which construction not only provides 
for an increased swing over the car- 
riage, but at the same time permits the 
machine to lie used at full swing with- 
out the tool overhanging the bed, a 
construction which adds greatly to the 
rigidity of the machine when turning 
work of large diameters. 

The apron is constructed of a one- 
piece box section casting with all gears 




one of a New Line of Lathes Manufactured by the London Machine Tool Co., Hamilton. 



50 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



ami studs supported at both ends. The 
apron has a wide bearing on the car 
ri&ge, is held in position bj lour l>olt>. 
and is tit ted to the carriage bj means oi 
a tongue. The single bos section form 
of tin- apron, it is stated by the manu- 
facturers, does awaj with the necessity 
of an auxiliary support at the lower end 
of the apron, and overcomes the diffi- 
culty of uneven wear between such low it 
slides and the V on the top of the bed. 

The longitudinal and cross feeds are 
operated by a single friction, which, in 
addition to being of large diameter, is 
>o placed in regard to the gearing, thai 
it has but a liuht duty to perform. 

Nine changes of speed for the lead- 
screw are obtained by means of the cone 
oi gears and the tumbler. The tumbler 
gear is supported on a cylindrical bear- 
ing, and is securely locked in position 
by the plunger in the change handle. 
construction is the same as has 
been used on the LeBlond lathes for 
some time. The nine changes men- 
tioned above are quadrupled by the ad- 
dition of a sliding gear transmission. 
The gears of this sliding transmission 
are operated by the lower lever. This 
construction permits of the use of a 
spee< 1 or index plate whieh reads direct- 
ly, and from which the operator can see 
at a glance the position of the levers 
required for any desired speed. The 
changes can be ma i ■■ while the lathe is 
running under the heaviest cut. The 
gears in the gear box as well as all 
other feed -ear- are made from drop- 
forged steel blanks. The feed rod is 
driven by the same mechanism by means 
of gears connecting it with the lead- 



screw, the range of feed being from 4 
to 120 per inch. The changes for the lead 
screw provided by the gear box are 
thirty-six in number, ranging from 1 to 
.id threads per inch. 

The feed box is connected to the 
spindle by means of gears, the intermed- 
dle one of which is mounted on a quad- 
rant, which permits the use of compound 
gearing at this point if required, for 
cutting special or metric threads with 
a standard English pitch lead-screw. A 
metric pitch lead-screw can also be sup 
plied, in which case the gearing arrange- 
ment permits of cutting English pitch 
threads with this screw, by using com- 
pound gearing in the same manner. 

These lathes are manufactured by «the 
London Machine Tool Co., Hamilton, 
who have arranged with the K. K. Le- 
Blonde Machine Tool Co., for the manu- 
facture of their lathes in Canada. These 
are made on exactly the same lines as 
those built in the United States. 



SPIRAL GEAR CUTTING. 

The illustration shows a Pratt & Whit- 
ney 6 x 14-ineh thread milling machine 
arranged for the cutting of spiral gears. 
The relation between the inner and outer 
spindle by means of which indexing is 
accomplished, is controlled directly by 
the index plate and pawl. The quick 
return device which is very conveniently' 
actuated by a crank located at the front 
of the machine is very rapid in opera- 
tion. 

The machine is provided with pre- 
cision lead and cross feed screws. Mi- 
crometer dial ami positive adjustable 
stop give verv accurate control of cutter 



head. Ouc of the strong points of the 
thread milling machine is the locating of 
i lie cutter in a manner to prevent chip 
interference, which makes possible ex- 
ceptionally last feed without sacriticiug 
quality of work. Three cutter speeds 
are provided. Eighteen carriage feeds 
lor each speed of the cutter are instant- 
ly obtained by means of a geared feed 
box, 

The machine and attachments have 
been placed on the market by Pratt & 
Whitney, 1 fart ford, Conn. 

INTERNAL THREAD MILLING. 

The illustration shows a recently de- 
\ eloped attachment for the milling of 
internal threads on the Pratt & Whit- 
ney thread milling machine. The cutter 
head, which is of rigid construction 
throughout, is made a complete unit and 
may be readily accommodated to the 
regular carriage. Its proper relation 
with the carriage is maintained by- 
means of long dovetail bearings and a 
taper gib which may be readily adjust- 
ed for wear. The cutter head proper 
is so mounted that the necessary swivel- 
ing action for proper cutter clearance 
is obtained without disturbing the cen- 
tral relation of cutter and work, accur- 
ate graduations being provided for this 
purpose. The cutter head when set to 
the required angle is securely clamped 
to its seat by means of powerful bolts 
which makes it equal to a solid member 
in points of rigidity. 

The cutter spindle which is made of 
tool steel is hardened," ground and 
lapped. Tt is provided with a taper 





Pratt & Wultlng Thread Milling Machine for Spiral Gear Cutting 



Fig 1 — rratt & Whiting Thread Milling Machine for Internal 
Thread Milling. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



61 



hole for the reception of the various 
cutter arbors, a drawback bolt being 
provided for holding the arbors in 
place. The bronze sleeve or box in 
which the spindle runs is mounted in 
the head m a manner to permit the 
longitudinal adjustment of the spindle, 



(;h nek and closer, as shown in place on 
the machine, has proven exceptionally 
efficient for work within its range. This 
step chuck, as will be noted, is provided 
with adjustable jaws, which are inde- 
pendent of the closing mechanism and 
when once set to the desired diameter 




Fig. 



-Examples of Intricate Milling. 



which is very convenient in re-setting 

the cutter to a previously cut thread. 
The cutter spindle is driven directly 
from the main driving shaft by means 
of gearing. Backlash in the driving 

ars which would tend towards the 
vibrating or chattering of the cutter, 
lias been eliminated by the introduc- 
tion of a fly-wheel. This fly-wheel is 
mounted in bearings independent of the 
spindle, yet in a manner to obtain the 
desired result very effectively. 

A feature of the thread milling 
i lachine is the accurate and positive 
control of the cutter head obtained by 
means of the micrometer dial and posi- 
tive adjustable stop. The simple and 
uniquely constructed stop which per- 
mits the withdrawing of the cutter from 
t he work and accurately returning 
same to the exact previous depth, has 
proven especially valuable on internal 
work. 

The cutter is provided with three 
speeds by means of a three-step cone. 

ighteen carriage feeds are obtainable 
for eacli cutter speed through a gear 
box. 

Tiie machine may be arranged for the 
cutting of either single or multiple 
threads. When arranged for multiple 
threading, as shown in the illustration, 
the work-holding appliance is carried 
"ii the inner spindle, the outer spindle 
being provided with a very accurate 
index ring by means of which any mul- 
tiple of thread desired may be cut. The 
index ring is very large in diameter in 
proportion to the work operated upon, 
therefore the tendency to inaccuracy 
is reduced to the minimum. 

While the design of the spindle read- 
ily lends itself to the accommodation 
of the holding appliances necessary for 
the various classe of work, the step 



or contour will hold the work rigidly 
and true. It is rapidly_a,nd conveniently 
operated by a drawback rod from the 
back of the spindle. 

The attachment, as regularly made, is 
suitable for the threading of holes from 
about l 1 /; inches to inches in diameter. 
It is equally well suited for single or 
multiple threads, either right or left 
hand. The machine may also be readily 
adapted for work out of the ordinary, 
a striking example of which is the de- 
vice shown in the illustration. 

The machine and attachments have 
been placed on the market by Pratt & 
Whitney, Hartford, Conn. 



UNIVERSAL WOOD GEAR CUTTING 
MACHINE. 
A new gear cutting machine has been 
designed and placed upon the market by 
the Newark Gear Cutting Machine Co., 
Newark, X.J., for the purpose of cut- 
ting the teeth of wood gears for pat- 
terns, especially spiral or helical geais. 
There is a wide field of work requirhs 




heavy cast tooth "herring boae" or 
double helical gears, and such gears can 
be cast solid, from patterns cut on th.s 
machine. The pattern is in such case 
made in two pieces, one right and one 
left hand; but the casting is of course 
solid. 

The machine has a capacity for spur 
gear patterns up to 8 feet diameter by 
24 inch, face; and helical or "spiral" 
gear patterns up to 7 feet diameter by 
21 inch. face. Any lead or angle of 
worm may be cut, as well as any num- 
bers of threads; and any lead or angle 
of helical gear may also be cut. The 
range of pitches which the machine is 
capable of cutting is of course very- 
large. By using tly cutters, all pitches 
ranging from 1 inch, circular up to 7 
inch circular can be easily taken care 
of, and of course heavier pitches can 
also he cut by using regular rotary gear 
cutters. 

In this machine, the feed is obtained 
by means of a hand wheel, operating a 
screw, with ball thrust collars. This 
hand feed is used, so that the operator 
may feed very fast during the full cut, 




Fig. 1 — Universal Wood Gear Cutting Ma 
for Cutting Spur Ge*r Patterns. 



i >-• -' L'n;;e:s..i >Vood Gear < utting Machine 
for Cutting Helical Gears or Worms. 

and may feed more slowly as the grain 
in the wood changes, or the cutter 
strikes a knot in the wood, or when the 
cutters come through at the end of the 
cut. After each tooth is cut the cutter 
carriage is returned to start a new cut, 
and the blank is indexed by the hand 
crank. A counterbalance serves to 
equalize the weight of the carriage. 

The indexing is obtained by means of 
change gears. The operator makes one 
or more even turns of the crank, accord 
ing to the index furnished 

All numbers of teeth can be cut, up to 
100; and all from UK) up to 15b, except- 
ing prime numbers above Kill, and a 
wide range of numbers above 450 can 
also be eut. When any unusual number 
is required, this can be arranged for, by 
means of an extra change gear. 

In operation, the wooden pattern blank 
is mounted upon the work arbor, or up- 
on the fact plate dir«ot. Bloekt of 



52 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



wood may also be cut on this machine, 
ior use in gear tooth molding machines 
A rim support is provided lor taking 
the thrust in the cut, in large gears. 

The (ace plate is solid with the divid- 
ing worm wheel, which wheel is made 
in two seel urns and generated m place, 

to secure accuracy. The dividing worm 

may he adjusted out oi mesh with the 
wheel, to permit the blank to be rotat- 
ed bj hand. The dividing worm is also 
provided with adjustment ior use in re- 
setting, or in taking side cuts 

A complete guard protects the worm 
and wheel from dust and dm 

The work head is adjusted on the bed, 
to take care of the various diameters to 
be cut; the adjustment being obtained by 
means of screw, with dial graduated to 
read to thousandths oi an inch. 

A noticeable feature oi this machine, 
is the simple method oi driving, as 
shown in Fig. 2, by means of an endless 
belt. The machine itself is driven by 
means of a tight and loose pulley ar- 
rangement on the machine; the pulleys 
running upon a rigid sleeve, and not up- 
on the shaft, thus relieving the shaft of 
all strain of the belt pull, and eliminat- 
ing the possibility of the machine start- 
ing up accidentally. 

The cutters used on the machine, for 
heavy pitches, are shown in the illustra- 
tions. When cutting spur gear patterns, 
a formed fly cutter is used, mounted up- 
on the spindle as shown in Fig. 1. This 
spindle makes :i2<Mi revolutions per 
minute. When cutting helical gears or 
worms, an endmill form of fly cutter is 
used, mounted upon the endmill attach- 
ment shown in Fig. 2, making 4200 re- 
volutions per minute. The spindles are 
of high carbon machinery steel, accur- 
ately ground, and run in phosphor 
bronze bearings. 

Although the machine is designed for 
cutting wood, yet the design generally 



and the construction show distribution 
of the metal, with deep bed and box 
form of construction. This eliminates 
the tendency to vibration which would 
otherwise result from this class 
of work. The machine is very rapid in 
operation, as for example:— A wooden 
spur gear pattern, Id teeth, 3 inch, cir- 
cular pitch, 8 inch face, was cut in 30 
minutes, cutting time. A motor drive 
can be readily provided for, as the 
machine pulley runs at constant speed. 



AUTOMATIC CYLINDRICAL GRIN- 
DER. 

The illustrations herewith show a new 
cylindrical automatic sizing grinder 
which has just been placed on the mar- 
ket by Pratt & Whitney, Hartford. Conn. 
The machine is designed for medium 
size work and has a capacity of 30 inches 
between centres, with a swing over bed 
of 4 inches, and can be adjusted to a 
maximum taper per foot of 2 inches. 




Fig. 3 — Automatic Sizing Attachment. 

The machine uses a 12-inch diameter 
wheel, with a face from V2 to 1% inches. 
Particular attention has been bestowed 
upon the table feeds and six changes 
have been provided for, any of which 
are immediately obtainable through a 
gear bos and lever, the latter being lo- 



cated at the front of the machine, under 
the operator's hand. These feeds are 
independent of either wheel or work 
speeds. The reversing mechanism has 
been designed to effect reversal within 
0.001 inch, a matter of considerable im- 
portance in grinding up to shoulders. 




Feeding Back 



The form of the table top has also 
received particular attention and is made 
with a flat top and angular sides, in 
order to insure accurate re re-location of 
attachments. 

The most important recent improve- 
ment is the automatic sizing device as 
applied to this machine. This device 
when once set to the required diameter 
will automatically grind any number of 
pieces irrespective of the wear of the 
wheel. 

In operation both roughing and finish- 
ing feeds are controlled and utilized, this 
not only greatly increases the produc- 
tion capacity of the machine but also 
insures far more accurate and uniform 
work than that resulting from ordinary 
micrometer measurement. A decided 
advantage made possible by this device 
is the ability of one workman to operate 
two machines to their maximum capacity 
without the slightest difficulty. 





Fig 1 1 y\ odi cal Automatic Sizing Qrlnder. 



Fig. 



Automatic Feeding Mechanism; Cylindrical Grinder. 



POWER GENERATION X APPLICATION 

For Manufacturers. Cost and Efficiency Articles Rather Than Technical. 
Steam Power Plants ; Hydro Electric Development ; Producer Gas, Etc. 



BELTS AND BELT DRIVES.* 

By A. E. B. 

T^FI/IS and belt drives, the title of 
-*-* this article, will treat paticularly 

of the part played by leather belts as a 
means of transmission of power. Need- 
less to say, their overwhelming, uni- 
versal and undiminished use, stamps 
tliein as at once a subject of interest. 
One can hardly conceive of a factory 
without associating with it a belt drive, 
and our whole circle of readers is there- 
tore expected to be benefited more or 
less. Such at least is hoped for. 
Choice of Belt. 
in the choice of a belt, the tirst con- 
sideration is that it be made from a 




Fig. 1— The Bristol Belt Fastener. 

good hide. All users are aware of the 
vast and varying range of quality offer- 
ed at equally varying prices, and that it 
is no easy matter for the average pur- 
chasing agent to discern and choose to 
the best advantage his requirements. 
Some indicative opinion may be had by 
cutting a thin shaving from the samples 
offered, and tearing them between the 
fingers. Much belting is sold by weight, 
consequently unscrupulous dealers do 
not hesitate sometimes to impregnate 
the material with sugar and like sub- 
stances, useless and worse than useless 
for any purpose, except increasing the 
seller's profits. The test already men- 
tioned will enable even the unskilled to 
form an opinion as to how much of his 
purchase is leather, and how much sim- 
ply weight-making material. 

Lubrication and Stretch. 

From the user's point of view, two 
thing's should be borne in mind. Dry 
leather is to be avoided and the belt 
should be thoroughly stretched. 

Leather belts lose a good deal of their 
strength and nature unless hnpermeat- 
ed with a certain amount of oil. Good 
quality cod oil is largely used for the 
purpose. This treatment gives pliabil- 
ity, ensures good driving qualities due 
to easy bedding of the belt on the pul- 
ley, and acts as a proof against the 
absorption of moisture. 



An ordinary belt thus lubricated, de- 
velops a stretching propensity, which 
is, of course, both troublesome and 
wasteful. For example, a new bell is 
put on to drive a machine, and in a few 
days it will probably have stretched 
some inches and be altogether too slack, 
necessitating a piece being cut out. 
wasted, and time taken to break and re- 
make the joint. 






Fig. 2 — Types of Laced Joints. 

The problem, therefore, is to secure 
the admittedly advantageous features 
of "lubrication and stretch." 

The solution is obvious — Stretch the 
belt fully before application. Many 
makers do put their belts through a 
stretching machine, and the belts bene- 
fit thereby; but the simple, rapid run- 
ning through of a belt or parts of a 
belt is of little real use, seeing that the 
leather being in the same physical con- 
dition all the time, springs back to prac- 



tically its original length as soon as the 
tension is let off. 

A process of belt -stretching has, how- 
ever, been introduced, having many 
commendable features and apparently 
successful beyond dispute. It is de- 
scribed briefly, as follows: 

The hides from the tannery, prepared 
with a certain amount of moisture still 
in them, but with their oil dressing (in 
fact just in the condition in which most 
makers at once cut them up into belt 
strips) are taken to a special depart- 
ment fitted with special machinery. 
Each hide is placed over a strong frame 
and gradually stretched longitudinally 
until a 10 per cent, increase is reached; 
the lateral dimensions being meanwhile 
, oo — =, — oo . , 



.Li„:i, 



ArA/WV 



•I 



%rfW 






*Part I. of the second article of the series 
of Power Transmission Equipment, Operation 
and Efficiency Subjects. 





Pig. 4 — Hinge Belt Fastener. 

maintained by wedging. The required 
stretch having been obtained, the frame 
with its hide is taken away bodily and 
stored, sometimes for a period of sever- 
al weeks, until all the moisture has 
evaporated. When released, there is 
little if any tendency to spring back to 
the original dimensions, the lubrication 
and pliability are maintained, and we 
have practically a stretchless butt of 
equal or even greater strength than be- 
fore, and in ideal condition for cutting, 
jointing and the formation of a perfect 
belt. 

The process involves considerable ex- 
pense, and produces belts somewhat 
lighter, width for width, than un- 
stretched belts, so that obviously higher 
prices per pound must be charged, but 



rA/vVtyVi 



lw 



IVvVWw WWVw 




Fig. r> — The Jackson 
Beit Fastener. 



Fig. 3 — Types of Laced Joints. 



54 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



the evidence goes to show that for last- 
ing power, perfection of drive, and 
labor-saving, the belts are well worth 
their greater cost. 

Strength of Belt. 
ultimate tensile strength <> t" belt- 
ing is m.t generally a factor in power 
transmission calculations. It varies 
from 2,000 to .">,000 pounds per square 
iiu-h of net section in best quality 
leather belts, and may be reckoned al 
an average of say 3,500 pounds per 
square inch. This variation in ultimate 
strength is due not only to possible 
variation in the quality of the material, 
but to want of its homogeneity as well. 
Experiments uo to show that strips of 
equal width and thickness taken from 
the same belting butt, gave breaking 
strains varying from 1,500 to 3,500 
pounds per sq. inch. 

Strength of Belt Joints. 
The ultimate strength of a hoed 
joint well put together should lie taken 
at from 1.000 to 1.500 pound- per sq. 
inch, while that of a riveted joint may 
lie taken as equal to one-half of the 




Fit 



Tin- Jackson rvit Fastener 



strength of the solid belt, L,750 pounds 
per square inch. The working strength 
of the belt may, in practice, be taken 
as on. --third the ultimate strength of the 
joint. 

A series of tests of belts in actual 
use, showed the working strain to lie 
between 30 and 532 pounds per square 
inch. A commonly accepted working 
strain for best material of belt body, 
and substantial joint, is 320 pounds per 
sq. inch belt section, being 60 pounds 
per inch width for each 3-lli inch 
thickness, single belt. For double and 
treble belts the allowable strain would 
be 1.75 and 2.5 times that of single 
belts respectively. See bell creep. 
Adhesion of Belts. 

The motion transmitted by a bell is 
maintained solely by the frictional ad 
m of the bell to the pullej rim sur 
face. Belts do not communicate motion 
with precision on account of their liabil- 
ity to slip. With unequal dian 
pulley, and an open belt, slippage will 
take place on the smallesl pulley first, 
on account of the arc of contact being 
smaller. Crossing the belt makes the 
arc of contact le on both pulleys. 

A long horizontal belt increases t In- 
tension and arc of contact b> its weight 
forming a curve between the pulleys. 



It should therefore drive from the un- 
der side. A belt running on a pulley on 
a vertical shaft requires stretching 
tightly because its weight lessens its 
contact. As a compensation, the belt 




Fig. 7 Claw and Slide Belt Fastener. 

should be broader than for a horizontal 
drive of equal power. 

The adhesive grip of a belt is the 
same on east iron pulleys, whether 
turned or not. It is greater however, 
mi a wooden rim than on a cast iron 
rim. 

Slippage of Belts. 

A belt will slip just as readily on a 
pulley four feet in diameter as it will 
on a pulley two feet in diameter, pro- 
vided the conditions of the faces of the 
pulleys, the arc of contact, the tension, 
and the number of feet the belt travels 
per minute, are the same in both cases. 

A belt of a given width, and making 
any given number of feet per minute, 
will transmit as much power vanning 
on pulleys two feet in diameter, as it 
will on pulleys four feet in diameter, 
provided the arc of contact, tens-on, and 
conditions of pulley faces are the same 
in both cases. 




Fig. 8— Hinge Belt Fastener. 

I'auses of belt slippage <\w because 

they are overloaded, dirty, clogged, 
dried up and neglected. Slipping gen- 
erates heat, and aggravates the trouble 
-till further. The false, but common 
remedy of tightening up, or overt ight- 
ening as it should properly be called, 
only results in straining the life out of 
the belt, increasing the coal consump- 



tion by increased bearing friction and 
disalignment of shafting. 

It stands to reason that while slip 
may be prevented by undue tightening, 
this is not the right method to make 
the belt do its full duty justly. The 
added tension cannot help but increase 
journal friction, strain the shafting, in- 
crease the danger 6f hot boxes and worn 
bearings and increase the number of de- 
lays due to sudden belt failures, the 
prevention of which alone effects saving. 
Xo matter how well the bearings are 
lubricated, some of the pull on the belt 
is wasted in overcoming the add«"d fric- 
tion, and the capacity of the drive is 
reduced to the extent of overcoming 
this. 

(•n the other hand, a belt that is kept 




Fig. 9— Hinge Belt Fastener. 

clean, mellow and otherwise in good 
condition throughout, by means of a 
suitable preservative, bends around the 
pulleys with less resistance and by 
reason also of a close conformity with 
unevenness of the pulley surface, can be 
eased or even run slack without danger 
of slip under full load. In fact, a belt 
that is properly filled and is of correct 
dimensions for* its work, should break 
! efore slipping. 

Preservation of Belting. 
Engineers usually pay little attention 
to their belting except that which is 
giving immediate trouble, when as a 
matter of fact, proper treatment with a 
suitable preservative at regular inter- 
vals would greatly benefit all the belt- 
ing. Not only would its life be pro- 
longed, but by increasing the pliability 
and lubrication of the internal fibres, 
it would be kept softer, cling to the 
pulleys better, and run slack without 
slip, ensuring a saving of power that 
would much more than pay for the at- 
tention and cost of the preservative 
preparation. Anyone will understand 
this on considering that the natural in* 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



65 



gredients of a leather, cotton, or camel's 
hair belt, manila or hemp driving rope, 
slowly dry out, and leave the contact 
surfaces hard. Unless something is ad- 
ded to replace these natural ingredients 
the belt or rope cannot be expected to 
grip the pulley close enough to trans- 
mit full load. 

Creep of Belt. 

By creep of belt is meant its stretch- 
ing and contracting propensity as it 
passes over the driven and driving pul- 
leys respectively, and is due to its in- 
herent elasticity and nature of load. 
The tight side of the belt is under the 
greater strain, hence it stretches as it 
comes on the driver and contracts com- 
ing off. In a word, more belt length 
goes on to the driver than comes off it, 
and more comes off the driven pulley 
than goes on. The net result is that 
there is a continuous creep or shifting 
of the belt around the pulleys in a 
direction opposite to that in which the 
belt runs. Fig 10. 

Belt creep in practice is usually kept 
within a one per cent, limit, and to 



0/ilV£/Y /w/u^y 



the effective pull. Such a method ad- 
mits of the use of smaller pulleys, and 
prolongs the life of the belt. 

Horse Power of Belting. 

Users of belting are frequently mis- 
led as to the amount of work which 
should be expected of a good belt, with 
the result that it is put to an excessive 
strain and sent to the serap heap in a 
short time, condemned as to quality. 

This condition of affairs is due in 
large part to incorrect rules for calcu- 
lating the power of belting. 

These rules are in many cases wide 
apart in their results as are the poles, 
and the practice of them is so varied 
that hardly any two users adopt the 
same. In the face of this seeming utter- 
ly irreconcilable state of affairs, I make 
no pretension of pointing out where 
each errs, or of submitting a rule to 
which all others should give place. 

The following explanation, however, 
of the considerations to be accounted 
and the rules accompanying, have been 
made the basis for numerous installa- 
tions by the writer, and to those who 




Fig. 10— Belt Drive. 



make certain of its attainment, the 
working strain for best material belt 
body and substantial joint is taken at 
40 pounds per inch width, single belt, 
with that for double and treble belts in 
the proportion already stated. 

Centrifugal Tension of Belts. 

When a belt runs at a high velocity, 
centrifugal force produces a tension in 
addition to that existing when the belt 
is at rest or moving at a low velocity. 
This centrifugal tension diminishes the 
effective driving force. 

Double belts are less pliable than 
single belts and the centrifugal force is 
greater, consequently the contact with 
the pulleys is less. Furthermore, the 
tension is seldom increased proportion- 
ately, and for these reasons, double 
belts should not be expected to transmit 
more than 8-5ths the power of single 
belts. 

This power may be increased, how- 
ever, by running two single belts on top 
of each other. Being thus more pliable 
they give better contact and increase 



may have a difficulty betimes in know- 
ing just what to do, and have their 
back to the wall," they will be found 
efficient and satisfactory in operating 
results. 

The power of belting is determined 
by the number of foot pounds which 
can be transmitted by one pulley to an- 
other, and is arrived at by multiplying 
the effective pull in pounds per inch of 
width, by belt width in inches and by 
belt speed in feet per minute; there- 
after dividing by 33,000. 

The effective pull or the force tend- 
ing to turn the pulley is the difference 
in tension between the slack and driv- 
ing sides of the belt, and is largely de- 
pendent on the arc of contact between 
the belt and the smaller pulley. 

To find the effective pull it is neces- 
sary to determine the number of de- 
grees in the arc of contact. This can 
be arrived at by multiplying the differ- 
ence between the pulley diameters in 
inches by four and three quarters, di- 
viding the product by the distance be- 



tween the pulley centres in feet, and 
subtracting the quotient from 180 de- 
grees. 

The allowable working strain for a 
single belt with 180 degrees contact is, as 
has been shown, 40 pounds per inch 
width. This multiplied by the arc of 
contact found in the previous calcula- 
tion and divided by 180 will give the 
effective pull allowable in pounds. 

Example. — Find the effective pull ami 
horse power of a 6-inch single leather 
belt on 24 and 36 inch pulleys, having 
a velocity of 2,000 feet per minute, and 
with pulley .centres 18 feet apart. 

(36— 24)X43/j 

Arc of contact=180— 



=180— 



18 
12X4.75 



18 

57 
=180 

18 
=180—3.16 
=176.84 degrees. 

176.84X40 
Effective pull= - =39.29 lbs. 

180 
39.29X6X2000 

Horse power = —=14.29 

33000 

Rules which take no notice of effective 
pull and known as empirical, have been 
likewise used by the writer to advan- 
tage, and are as follows: 

wxv 

800 

wxv 

500 

W=width of belt in inches. 
V=velocity in feet per rainute=cir- 
cumference of driving pulley in 
feet multiplied by revolutions per 
minute. 

Example.— Taking belt width and 
velocity as in previous example we get 



Single belts — horse power= 



Double belts — horse powei 



Single belt horse power= 



6X2000 



800 



=15 



The result is practically the same in 
each case, but arrived at by a much 
simpler method in the latter case. 

To ,uet the horse-power that a double 
belt of the same width and velocity 
would transmit, the second formula 
would be used. 

6X2000 

Double belt horse-power= — ■ =24. 

500 

Figs. 1 to 9 illustrate some methods of 
belt jointing and a few of the specialties 
in common use. 





Management 



WHAT IS SCIENTIFIC MANAGE- the physical movements used to trans 



MENT? 
Bj G. C. K. 

The question of "Scientific Manage- 
ment What il is and What it will do," 
has been prominently broughi before the 
mechanical men of America by the Ohi- 
ted States Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission. Expert testimony lias been 
given by such men as II. K. Hathaway. 
of the Tabor Mfg. Co., manufacturers of 
molding machines; .lames M. Dodge 
chairman of the Link-Belt Co., Phila- 
delphia; Henry K. Towne, president of 
the Vale & Towne Mfg. Co., Stamford, 
Conn., makers of Vale locks: Frank B. 
• iilbreth. New York; Henry L. Gantt; 
Harrington Emerson and Wm. Kent. 

Wm. Kent sums up Business Manage- 
ment iii a few line-. "Scientific manage- 
ment mighl he termed "applied common 
It requires a man to do only 
that work for which he is best suited, 
but requires him to do that work at bis 
greatest efficiency. It requires that he 
shall not do that work for which by 
training or environment he is unfitted 
and which someone else can do better 
than he. It requires that the conditions 
be made right for the greatest efficiency 
of the worker, this including not only 
the tools he works with, but bis sur- 
roundings, his pay. ami everything else 
which affects his work." 

Andrew Carnegie stated some years 
ago: "Take away all our factories, our 
trade, our avenues of transportation, 
our money, leave me our organization 
and system, and in four years T shall 
re-established myself." This, in 
brief, i- whal scientific management will 
do. 

Passing of Rule o' Thumb Methods. 

What it will do was given in an edi- 
torial in a recent issue ,,f the New York 
Time-. It stal serj concrete way 

what scientific management or system 
will do for any industry. 

By rule o' thumb a man could unload 

two tons of pig iron an hour, for which 

mployer paid him lb" cent- an hour. 

An observer, who had never handled a 
id of pig iron, saw thai the tracks 
in the foundry mighl fie [aid BO thai each 
bar need be carried not more than ten 
feet. By trial he saw that the average 
man unloading could move ,-if ;i greater 
average speed. He -aw that sever,-,] of 



fer a bar from car to pile were unneces- 
sary, consuming time and energy. In 
these three respects he established 
•'units of efficiency," taking care, also, 
to provide a system of rest intervals to 
prevent fatigue. lie then declared a 
standard of unloading pig iron at the 
rate of seven tons an hour to be easily 
practicable, and recommended a wage 
scale of 2.7 cents a ton, or 19 cents an 
hour, for the men who conformed to 
this standard. Under a sliding upward 
scale of wages, men were found willing 
and able to handle continuously ten tons 
an hour, for which service each received 
27 cents. The increase in output was 
Svefold that under the rule o' thumb; 
the wages paid were seven-tenths great- 
er, and the laborers were physically and 
financially better off. 

"Gangs shoveled with the same shovel 
such different materials as coal, coke, 
iron ore, sand, and lime. A man who 
had not seen much shoveling done, but 
with trained powers of observation, de- 
termined that for each material a shovel 
which would hold 22y 2 pounds — a fail- 
weight for the average laborer — should 
be of special size and shape. Then a 
set of necessary movements was devised 
with reference to physical leverages and 
speed. It was found, too, that a pile of 
lime or sand should be attacked at the 
top, and of coal at the bottom. Having 
fashioned the standard shovels, and de- 
vised the units of speed, movement, and 
weight, he found that the new method 
and a system of bonuses increased the 
efficiency of the shoveling gangs 150 pet- 
cent. 

"For forty centuries the bricklayer 
stooped to pick up his bricks. The 
"efficiency engineer" devised platforms 
on jacks raised by boys to the level of 
the growing wall. Under the rule o' 
thumb the bricklayer for ages turned 
his brick any or all of three ways to 
find the face, tested the good bricks, 
picked up and threw down the defective 
ones, which had to be lowered from the 
height to which they had been raised, 
and turned his trowel to tap each good 
brick into the mortar. Bovs now sort 
the bricks on the ground, piling the goo.l 
ones face forward upon the platforms, 
and the brick sinks of its own weight 
a new consistency of mortar. Brick- 



layers got $5 a day. (iilbreth enabled 
them to earn $0.80 a day, al the same 
time trebling their efficiency. 

"Such met hods kill rule o' thumb 
wherever introduced. They are not re- 
specters of persons or of professions or 
of trades. They are usually introduced by 
outsiders — men who 'know nothing about 
t he business.' " 

Actual and Possible Savings. 
In the December issue of Canadian 
Machinery the principles of scientific 
management applied to the repair and 

building of locomotives on the C. P. R. 
by Henry L. Gantt. These resulted in a 
saving of $65,000 per year. Harrington 
Emerson applying the priciples of scien- 
tific management to the Santa Fe rail- 
road effected a saving of approximately 
$5,000,000 in three years. Such was 
shown by the testimony given before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission at 
Washington. 

James M. Dodge pointed out the 
methods of management in the shops of 
the Link-Belt Co., Philadelphia, that 
made money. All work done in the shop 
is laid out for the workmen by a plan- 
ning department in accordance with rec- 
ords based on accurate time studies of 
the fundamental operations of the job; 
the machine tools have all been stand- 
ardized and their exact capacities are 
known ; in the shop the work is supervis- 
ed by functional foreman, each of whom 
attends to some feature of the work. 
By establishing a "system" the costs 
were reduced in the face of a rising 
labor and raw material market. 

Some Pertinent Questions. 

Writing to the Railway Age Gazette, E. 
T. Spidy, instructor Card Inspector. 
C. P. R. Angus shops asks the following 
pertinent questions. The foremen in 
various industries and railroad shops 
should carefully study them and strive 
to benefit by them. A study of them in 
detail will result in unprecedented sav- 
ings and show "good management." 

Ts my piecework system in good con- 
dition — can I improve it in any way? 

Have I machines that are overburden 
ed or doing a class of work for which 
they are not, suited? 

Tn what conditions are the machines? 
Are they in a state of good repair? 

Do any machines require re-speeding? 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



57 



Am T using the besl stool obtainable? 
Do T know what the best steel is? 

Are my tool standards correct? 

Do my men receive their tools in a 
satisfactory way? 

How is the tool room stocked? Are 
there sufficient tools ready for delivery? 

Do the men have trouble getting their 
work ? 

What kind of hoist service have the 
men at their machines for individual 
use? 

Are the men provided with sufficient 
light? 

Dave you a proper belt-repair system ? 
Conclusion. 

Tf managers, superintendents, master 
mechanics and foremen take the subject 
of Scientific Management seriously they 
will thank Louis D. Brandeis and the 
United Stales Interstate Commerce Cora- 
mission for the valuable data which has 
been brought to light. Mr. Brandeis 
stated that the railroads of the United 
States were wasting $1,000,000 per day 
through lack of system. No doubt the 
railroads have done much towards 
scientific management and some indus- 
tries have been wide awake, but there is 
still much to be done. 

Scientific management when applied 
to the simple operation of loading a 
freight car with pig iron increased the 
performance of the individual from 12 1/ 2 
to 47 tons; when applied to 
shovelling coal it doubled or trebled 
the performance of the shoveller; when 
applied to the machine shop it develop- 
ed, in certain operations, increases rang- 
ing fro?n 400 to 1,800 per cent. This 
has been done in the face of the in- 
creased cost of labor and material. The 
principles are general in their applica- 
tion and where applied, valuable results 
will be obtained. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES. 

The C.P.R. have issued a secoi'd edi- 
tion of their book on •'Ma-iufv.turrig 
and Business Opportunities in Western 
Canada," along the lines of the C.P.R. 
It is edited by John F. Sweeting, C.P. 
R. industrial agent, Winnipeg, and in ad- 
dition to an index of stations, it con- 
tains an index to industrial require- 
ments, facts in relation to the towns 
and cities of the West and tables of 
Western water powers. The following 
requirements for manufacturing concerns 
and power plants, are taken from this 
C.P.R. directory. 

Agricultural Machinery— Fort William, 
Ont., and Winnipeg, Man. 

Automobiles— Victoria, B.C. 

Cement Plant— Southey, Lanigan, Wey- 
burn, Macoun, Wilkie, Estevan, Francis, 
Outlook, Sask.; Edmonton, Bowden, 
Wetaskiwin, Crossfield, Penhold, Strath- 
cona, Didsbury, Hardisty, Strome, Al- 
berta; St. Boniface, Winnipeg, Man.; and 



Cranbrook, Kamloops, B.C.; Westfort, 
Ont. 

Cold Storage — Saskatoon, Sask. 

Can Factory — Victoria, B.C. 

Engine Works— Stationary, Marine and 
Traction, Fort William, Ont. 

Electrical Supplies — St. Boniface, 
Man. 

Electric Lighting Plant — Holland, 
Souis, Pilot Mound, Rapid City, Man.; 
Swift Current, Lang, Lanigan, Elbow, 
Areola, Sask.; Didsbury, Olds, Hardis- 
ty, Innisfail, Leduc, Granum, Alberta ; 
and Port Moody, B.C. 

Foundry — Saskatoon, Weyburn, Sask.; 
Camrose, Claresholm, Medicine Hat, Al- 
berta, and Kamloops, Rossland, B.C. 

Gasoline Engine Works — Portage la 
Prairie, Man. 

Machine Shop — Saltcoats, Francis, 
Saskatoon, Strassburg, Estevan, Ha- 
warden, St.. Aldwyn, Perdue, Sask.; 
Shoal Lake, Glenboro, Rapid City, Mor- 
ris, Man.; Wetaskiwin, Camrose, Amisk, 
Metiskow, Stirling, Alberta ; and Arm- 
strong, Rossland, B.C. 

Motor Car Factory — Regina, Sask. 

Nail Works — Fort William, Ont.; and 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Planing Mill— Austin, Gimli, Man.; 
Wevburn, Sask. 

Sash and Door Factory — Virden, Rapid 
City, Man.; Wapella, Areola, Wilkie. 
Strassburg, Elbow, Sask.; Coleman, 
Alberta; and Fernie, Port Moody, 
Nicola, Enderby, Kitchener, B.C. 

Saw Mills— Gimli, Man. 

Smelting Works — Medicine Hat, Al- 
berta. 

Shingle Mills— Nakusp, B.C. 

Wire Fence Factorv — Calgary, Alberta 

The G.T.R. Industrial Bureau an- 
nounce the following openings for busi- 
ness along the line of the G.T.P. in 
Western Canada: — 

Box Factory — Edmonton, Alta. 

Brick Manufacturer — Lazarp, Man.; 
Biggar, Waldron, Sask. 

Carpenter Shop— Anoka. Otthon, Alta. 

Foundrv — Edmonton. Alta 



Societies and Personal 

F. H. Sexton, director of technical 
education for Nova Scotia, is to accom- 
pany the Technical Education Commis- 
sion on its visit to Europe. 
* * « 

A. J. Caul, of Gaul & Girourard. Tor- 
onto, read a paper on "Diamond Minine 
in South Africa" before the Central 
Railway and Engineering Club on Jan. 
17. 

• • • 

The closing of the works of the Can- 
adian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Toronto, for 
a dav. was n fitting tribute to the mana- 
ger Percy C. Brooks, who recently lost 
his wife and three children in the burn- 



ing of his home when he was in Chicago. 
The sympathy of Canadian Machinery 
and its readers, is extended to Mr. 

Brooks in his sad bereavement. 

* » • 

Walter J. Sadler, who for the past 
fifteen years has been connected with 
the firm of Sadler & Haworth, Mon- 
treal, manufacturers of leather belting, 
has been taken into partnership. 

* • * 

F. M. Brown, general purchasing agent 
of the Dominion Steel Corporation, has 
resigned to accept the position of vice- 
president and general manager of the 
Nova Scotia Car Works, the company 
that succeeds the Silliker Car Co. 

* * * 

The St. Thomas machinists will hold 
a ball on Feb. 16, in the Engineers' Hall. 
The following are the committees: Invi- 
tation committee, Stalker Booth, John H. 
Grey, Peter Erickson; music committee, 
W. E. Moore, Frank Clark; hall commit- 
tee, Thos. Stone, John Lane; refresh- 
ment committee, Thos. Stone, W. E. 
Moore, J. H. Grey; chairman, J. Lane; 
secretary-treasurer, W. E. Moore. 

* * • 

Lake Superior Corporation. 
Vice-President J. F. Taylor, of ihe 
Lake Superior Corporation, Sault Ste. 
Marie, has been appointed general man- 
ager and W. C. Franz has been ,i arie 
vice-president of the transportation in- 
terests of the corporation. Other 
changes include the promotion of H. 
L. Jones to the post of assistant secre- 
tary-treasurer, and that Consulting En- 
gineer Ernst to general manager of the 
Algoma Steel Co., with C. E. Duncan 
as general superintendent. 

* * * 

Winnipeg Boilermakers. 

Fort Garry Lodge 451 , Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Winnipeg, held its annual 
smoking concert January 17, to which 
the C.P.R. were also invited. The chair 
was occupied by President J. Tumil- 
son, and the programme which was con- 
tributed to by the best entertainers 
from both unions, was of very interest- 
ing character. Character songs and 
step dances were given by J. Crawford 
and J. Mugford, the other contributors 
including J. Hawthorne, W. Lawlor and 
J. Edwards. 

At the recent annual meeting, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: J. Tumil- 
son, president, re-elected; J. Handford. 
vice-president; J. Hume, financial ami 
corresponding secretary; J. Tumilson, 
treasurer; J. Waddington, recording 
secretary; J. Hawthorne, inspector; R. 
Gardiner, guard; J. Handford, F. Mag- 
ford and J. Tomes, trustees. The instal- 
lation was conducted by J. Hume, past 
president. 



H 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Radian Machinery 

<p MANUFACTURING NEWS^ 

\ monthly newspaper devoted to machinery and manufacturing interests 
mechanical and electrical trades, the foundry, technical progress, construction 
and improvement, and to all useis of power developed from steam, gas, elec- 
rioity. compressed air and water in Canada. 

The MacLean Publishing Co., Limited 



JOHS BAYSE MACLEAN 
H. V. TYRRELL, Toronto 
G.C KEITH, ME., B.Sc , Toronto 
PETER BAIN, ME., Toronto 



Presidmt 

Business Manager 
Managing Editor 
Associate Editor 



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Subscribers who are not receivine their paper regularly will confer a 
lavor on us by letting us know. Wt should be notified at once of any 
change In address, giving both old and new. 



Vol. VII. 



February, 1911 



No. 2 



CANADIAN MACHINERY EDITORIAL INDEX. 

At the close of the past year many requests came to 
us from suhscribers of Canadian Machinery for an edito- 
rial index for use in binding their 1910 volume. In order 
that every subscriber may obtain the greatest use of his 
1911 volume, we are numbering the editorial pages con- 
secutively and at the end of the year, will issue a com- 
plete index of articles and authors, so that any article 
may easily be found by a reference to the index. 

This is one of many steps forward which we contem- 
plate taking and which will be announced from time to 
time. By means of these we hope to make Canadian 
Machinerv of still greater use to our readers. 



INCOMPETENCY AND INEFFICIENCY. 

It seems that in the last analysis, the employer or re- 
sponsible administrative head of a factory or corporation 
is he who determines the grade of efficiency of the under- 
taking. 

We don't associate with an intelligent employer a 
stupid, ignorant official and administrative staff, but ra- 
ther do we expect such a staff as will reflect his attri- 
butes. 

The Belection of men to lill (he various subordinate ap- 
pointments is not wholly a trial and error proposition, 
neither is it an evolution or "survival of the fittest." De- 
finite, reliable, personal knowledge or experience of abil- 
ity determines in large degree who shall fill the more re- 
sponsible posts, and a corresponding line of action is 
again developed with regard to those further down the 
scale. 

While it is possible to evolve men for positions, or 
have the position evolve as it were the man, and while 
S'lrh instances are of daily occurrence and necessarily so, 



it is inexpedient to operate from such a basis as a busi- 
ness principle. 

We are accustomed these days to read and hear much 
about the cost of incompetence and inefficiency, and to see 
many more or less glaring spectacles of it, but what 
strikes one most forcibly about the two evils is their uni- 
versality and existence in every walk of life. In the best 
and highest realms of human development and culture as 
well as in the lowest and ignorant, there is to be found 
incompetency, there is to he found inefficiency. 

The question arises, can we minimise, escape from or 
cut out entirely this condition of things ? It seems as 
tnough it were absolutely necessary to do so. 

Escape from this dual curse, for such it is, does not 
of course imply that all men would be equally competent 
in any or every sphere of usefulness. The fault at the 
present time is that men don't fill their own individual 
niche to the best of their inborn and knowledge-nurtured 
ability, nor do they realize their intense, inherent pos- 
sibilities. A keen discernment of one's proper sphere 
would do much to minimise that feature of incompetence 
and inefficiency which arises as a direct result of men oper- 
ating in a wrong and unnatural department. 

Being human, however, escape will be possible of only 
partial attainment, and we should not lose sight of this 
stern fundamental fact. 

It is claimed that incompetency costs the city of 
Chicago one million dollars per day. John Wanamaker 
claims that incompetency costs his company twenty-five 
thousand dollars per day. Others again claim less or 
greater losses attributable to the same cause. 

The basis of estimation is not stated, neither can 
we judge the standpoint of the estimator. To criticize 
and say there is certain loss, comes easy and is only 
wrong in degree, which at all events may be enough ; but 
to charge the loss individually and in proper proportion 
and suggest a remedy, is neither easy nor pleasant if 
honestly and faithfully carried out. It is, however, the 
way to tackle the question properly, and most certain of 
remedial results. 

Getting back to our starting point again, it will ap- 
pear evident that the larger proportion of the loss is 
chargeable to the chief administrator, and he, if a fac- 
tory owner, suffers in his returns just to that extent. 

If it be the city of Chicago, the real administrators 
lose, to wit, the citizens. An inexorable law is therefore 
unfolded which metes out to all their share of punish- 
ment for neglect. 

One thing must not be overlooked in this crusade 
against incompetency and inefficiency ; the steady, certain 
real uplifting of mankind and its consequent change and 
raise of standard. 

If Chicago by some means or other redeemed itself by 
saving that million dollars per day, and nobodv will ques- 
tion its ability to do so if everyone did his or her own 
little part, if the employes of the Wanamaker companv 
each added their little extra effort to what exists, if the 
"kick" that everyone makes and the losses claimed were 
satisfied, as they could easily be on the amounts specified, 
what then ? 

Would Chicago, John Wanamaker, you and I be satis- 
fied ? No, and why ? 

The realization of what was esteemed competency and 
efficiencv, and which we prided ourselves in determining is 
not perfection as was thought. 

We have much to be thankful for that the ideal will 
always keep ahead, and that the craving to reach to it 



CANADIAN MACHINER\ 



59 



will still express the efforts made, as falling short through 
incompetence and inefficiency. 

The standard of estimation will be rising all the time, 
as it has done and is, and will be found more exacting as 
it takes each time higher ground. 

A scheme of education, not necessarily technical, 
which would dispose men to cultivate and use their intel- 
ligence in the selection of their proper sphere and the ef- 
ficient filling of it, as a personal moral responsibility, 
while not ushering in the millennium, will obliterate to a 
great extent what are certainly at present monstrosities 
of incompetence and inefficiency. 



MACHINERY MAINTENANCE SAVINGS. 

At a recent meeting of the National Machine Tool 
Builders' Association, C. K. Lassiter, Mechanical Super- 
intendent of the American Locomotive Co., read a paper 
on "The Design and Construction of Machine Tools from 
the User's Standpoint," in which he gave some excellent 
suggestions for the maintenance of equipment. By consis- 
tently carrying out a factory management system, giving 
specialized attention to the duties of caring for and main- 
taining equipment, large and almost inconceivable savings 
are made. By such a system, properly administered, the 
American Locomotive Co. have reduced the Jost productive 
machine hours from 12 to If per cent. There are 9,000 
machines in the plant. Formerly 1,000 were out of use 
continuously but now 100 machines is the average number 
out of service. 

In the plant referred to, each department has an in- 
spector who investigates the machinery for probable fail- 
ures or for conditions which might cause accidents to em- 
ployes. His findings are made out in the form of a report 
and immediate steps are taken to correct any condition 
which might render a machine idle. Where the design of 
the machine is at fault, it is strengthened or redesigned. 

The following shows the working of the system as giv- 
en by Mr. Lassiter : — 

"In one of our shops, by referring to our reports, we found 
tlint 40 per cent, of the failures were due to negligence. We 
were able to reduce this Item to 1*4 per cent. In another case 
we found that we were purchasing a certain machine from some 
of the machine tool builders, and there was an error in design 
which had existed for ten years on this machine, which was 
costing us something like $5,000 per year. We took the matter 
up with the machine tool builder and bad the design changed. 
This charge was eliminated, which was like picking up so much 
money. 

"We found that the maintenance on some machines which we 
bad in service was so heavy that we could not afford to keep the 
machine in service, and we replaced them with modern tools. This 
also showed a decrease in maintenance." 

Mr. Lassiter referred to the savings made by designing 
special machines : — 

"Most of the tools which we purchase for our works at 
present are built to specifications prepared by ourselves, and it 
is our aim to cut out every gear or moving part on all machines 
which is not actually needed for our class of work. 

"In specifying for planers, we require only one speed, as our 
work is so extensive that we can afford to put a planer on 
one class of work and never change It. 

"On vertical milling machines we have specified the design 
so as to have but one pair of gears between the motor and the 
cutting tool. 

"On large vertical boring mills we have cut out gear boxes 
and equipped the drive with a big plain pulley and placed a 
variable speed motor on the ceiling, where the counter-shaft 
had formerly been put. 

"On radial drills we have lowered the speed of the driving 
shafts and Increased their diameter, to reduce the maintenance 
on bearings." 

By a system of tests machines were designed with a 



view to the economical use of power in operating ma- 
chines. Mr. Lassiter says : — 

"In testing out some of our machines we found that there 
was a considerable amount of power used for removing a certain 
amount of stock. A good deul of this power, we found, was 
absorbed through the friction of unnecessary gears. This is 
one reason why we have tried to cut out every gear possible 
on all of the machines which we purchase. It not only saves 
maintenance, but also cost of power to operate machines." 

Keeping machines in service, cutting time between 
cuts, anticipating repairs and guarding against break- 
downs means a great aggregate saving. It means that 
more work can be done with a certain number of ma- 
chines when kept in good repair. Of course Canadian 
shops, or at least few of them, could keep a staff of in- 
spectors busy in an elaborate system but even in the smal- 
lest shop a careful investigation and study of each ma- 
chine will, in a great number of cases, result in an appre- 
ciable saving. 



TOPICS OF THE MONTH. 

It may seem a long step between manufacturing and 
sentiment but a kind word, an appreciative smile or a 
commendation for work well done will often increase the 
efficiency. These are often more effective in eliminating 
friction than so-called welfare departments planned on an 
elaborate scale. 



In the January issue of Canadian Machinery we ad- 
vocated providing sufficient vises in a machine shop. In 
addition to vises we might add clamps for lathe, planer 
and shaper, straps, etc. More time is often lost trying 
to find suitable tools, etc., than in the performance of the 
machine work. In the interests of economy we would 
suggest a complete equipment of these devices and a cen- 
tral place for keeping them. 



Well lighted jig, tool and pattern storage rooms, tool 
room and machine shop are more likely to be kept clean 
than dark ones. 



Recently a purchasing agent was quoted a price on 
car journal bearing metal. The metal was satisfactory 
but the price was high. By having an analysis made, he 
was able to call for tenders for a metal of the compo- 
sition shown by tne analysis. The result was that a re- 
liable firm furnished the metal at a considerable reduc- 
tion over the first price asked. The saving in a year was 
therefore, considerable. By following this plan for all 
materials that can be bought by specification, large sav- 
ings mav be made. 



The metal industry is thriving and growing apace in 
the mother country, in utter disregard of all pessimistic 
predictions. In this country only an occasional whisper is 
heard from those who see gloom ahead, and the whole 
trend of trade is in verification of the loudly expressed 
confidence of the best informed men in all lines of indus- 
try. 



Plans have been prepared for the new machinery hall 
at the Ottawa Exhibition. Manufacturers of machinery 
deserve to be well treated by exhibition directors. It is 
to be hoped that the $75,000 voted a year ago for a new 
machinery building for the Toronto exhibition, will soon 
result in the erection of a more modern structure thftft 
that now designated as "Machinery Hall." 



FOUNDRY PRACTICE and EQUIPMENT 

Practical Articles for Canadian Foundrymen and Pattern Makers, and 
News of Foundrymen's and Allied Associations. Contributions Invited. 



MOLDING HEAVY FLYWHEELS. 
By J. H. Eastham. 

Firms engaged in casting gas, oil, or 
steam engine parts, when faced with 
orders to meet customers' specifications, 
slightly different from, or "between" 
standard sizes, are often compelled to 
alter existing patterns, or to make new 
ones. 

Obviously when an order is placed for 
a single engine this becomes a costly 
process, and in the case of flywheels 
weighing several tons each, can be easily 
avoided. A common system of moulding 
these castings is to select a pattern 
nearest the size required, but a little 
smaller, and to "lag" up the rim and 
hub with loose strips, and the arms 
with sheet lead, an unsatisfactory 
method at best, adding consider- 
ably to cost of production, often result- 
ing in a lumpy casting, and causing 
much extra machining. 

Assuming the job in hand to be of or- 
dinary six-armed type, get a core box 
made full length from outside of hub to 
outside of rim, and tapering in width 
from one-sixth circumference of rim to 
one-sixth circumference of hub. Each 
core will thus contain one arm, which 
may be drawn out endways from hub or 
thick end. 



Cores to form outside of rim are best 
made in sections about two feet or two 
feet six inches long, to facilitate hand- 
ling when placing on stove carriage, and 
in mold afterwards. 

Level a hard bed in floor at full depth 
of casting, and one foot larger in dia- 
meter, and place in centre a round cake 
core exact size of diamater of hub. Next 
place arm section cores in position 
around this; being careful to keep tight 
up to centre to avoid overlapping, after- 
wards lowering outside rim cores to 
place. 

If not well equipped with cranes, 
place as many cores in position as pos- 
sible during meal hour, to avoid keep- 
ing other jobs waiting. Ram up tightly 
round the whole, (reasonable floor pres- 
sure will prevent any strain,) and strike 
off level with top of cores to form flat 
joint. Place centre core into position 
and cover hub with a cake core perfor- 
ated as desired for runners, insert gate 
pins, and vent pegs in holes provided in 
each arm core for purpose. 

Stuff joints of all cores with waste, 
place large square cope part over whole, 
and ram up lightly. If not in possession 
of cope sufficiently large, spread one 
inch or so of sand over cores, and cover 
with handiest loam plates obtainable. 
Place runner box in position, large en- 




Molding Heavy Flywheels. 



ough to hold at least 15 cwt. of metal 
in the case of castings weighing three 
tons or over. This may be dried or 
green, as considered advisable. Cover 
runners with ball or flat stoppers, and 
put weights in position, or bolt the 
whole down by cross bars to grid or 
plate in floor if possible. 

When pouring, wait till runner box is 
full before drawing first stopper, and 
take out remaining 1 or 2, according to 
size of casting, singly. 

Metal for these castings should be 
melted as hot as possible, and poured as 
soon as surface "breaks," to obtain 
best results, and should consist of about 
16 per cent, good quality hematite, the 
remainder, hard scrap. 

Good hematite iron, on account of its 
toughness, minimizes risk of breakage 
when running at high speeds. Should 
these castings show signs of sponginess 
in boring, decrease quantity of hematite 
a little, and add a small percentage 
white iron to close grain. Churning is 
optional, and depends largely on fore- 
man's opinion and quality of metal 
used. 

By the addition or removal of strips 
from core boxes to alter radii of cores, 
and thickness or depth of ;im, and 
keeping in stock of pattern shop several 
sizes of arms, one set of boxes v, ill 
serve for several sizes of castings. 

PATTERNMAKER'S TOOL CHEST. 
By H. J. McCaslin. 

The accompanying photographs show 
the manner in which the up-to-date and 
progressive patternmaker carries his 
tools, and which has to a great degree 
replaced the strong box of bygone days. 

This handsome case and contents of 
selected tools forms one of the finest 
pattern-making equipment that ever 
came under the writer's notice. 

The case was designed and made by 
J. E. Rexroth, an employe of the Well- 
man, Seaver, Morgan Co., of Cleveland, 
0., through whose courtesy the photo- 
graph was obtained. 

The body construction is that of a 
substantial sample case which it closely 
resembles as shown in Fig. 1. While it 
might be said one would not inspire to 
carry it any further than necessary, very 
little trouble would be experienced in 
getting it to and from the car, thus 
saving the expense of the expressman, 
to say nothing of the delay and vexation 
in not always being able to get your 
tools at the expected time. 



Canadian machinery 



61 



Its proportions permit a 2C-inch saw 
by removing the handle of the saw to 
be carried, and also a 24x14 inch, steel 
square. The heavier tools, as the plains, 
are carried at the bottom of the case 




Fig. 1— Patternmaker's Tool Chest— Closed. 

below the lawer drawer, which is shown 
removed, Fig. 2. 

Attached to the back of the panel 
which is dropped down so as to expose 
the chisels and bits and their manner 
of arrangement and support is the steel 
square, shrink rules and triangles. To 
the young patternmaker who contem- 




l'iir. 2 — Patternmaker's Tool Chest — Open. 

plates leaving the home shop at the 
completion of his term of instruction 
and taking to the road in search of ex- 
perience and wealth, secure a case simi- 
lar to that here described, if you have 
not already done so. Should you not 
care to enlist as heavily into the under- 
taking as herewith shown, invest in a 
good substantial suit case and fit it up 
with drawers which will answer the pur- 
pose admirably. 



for Hill & Griffith, Cincinnati. The lines 
of this firm which will be carried in 
stock in Toronto, include stove plate 
facing, heavy machine bag facing, 
"Ideal" core wash, Ilaskin patent ven- 
tilated chaplets, "Faultless" core com- 
pound, Rhode Island heavy bag facing, 
H. & G. blacking, white pine charcoal 
facing, special taper snap flask of sheet 
steel with malleable trimmings, tumbl- 
ing barrels, cupolas, electric and hand 
cranes, brass melting furnaces, both oil 
and coke fired, cupolo blocks and bricks, 
fire clay and molding sands. 

Hill & Griffith have seacoal mills in 
Birmingham, Alabama, and plumbago 
mills in Cincinnati. 

Mr. Hill, who is known to the trade 
as "Honest John," has some strong ar- 
guments in favor of his products and 
calls attention to the H. & G. facings 
by means of an old and trite saying : 
"If you want to find out if a horseshoe 
is hot, pick it up. You are not obliged 
to take the blacksmith's word for it." 

"Likewise," says John, "you are not 
obliged to heed our argument which 
necessarily has to do with our foundry 
facings and blackings, their use and 
abuse." 



CANADIAN AGENGY HILL & GRIF- 
FITH. 

The Rupert G. Bruce Co., Toronto, 
have been appointed Canadian agents 



PITTSBURG EXHIBITION. 

Final arrangements for the exhibition 
of foundry and pattern shop equipment, 
machine tools and supplies, to be held 
under the auspices of the Foundry and 
Machine Exhibition Co., successor to the 
Foundry and- Manufacturers' Supply 
Association, at Pittsburg, during the 
week of May 22, 1911, were made at a 
meeting of the executive committee of 
this organization held at the Fort Pitt 
hotel, Pittsburg, Jan. 20 and 21. The 
buildings of the Western Pennsylvania 
Exposition Society, on Duquesne Way, 
in the centre of the Pittsburg business 
district, have been obtained for this ex- 
hibition of foundry and pattern shop 
equipment. A total of approximately 
:i.5,000 square feet of floor space will be 
available in two large buildings and in a 
temporary structure which will be erect- 
ed between these buildings. All of the 
operating exhibits, such as heating and 
melting furnaces, core ovens, mold and 
ladle dryers, etc., will be located in the 
temporary building. The facilities pro- 
vided for exhibition purposes are unex- 
celled, and shipments can be unloaded 
onto the grounds from Pennsylvania 
railroad sidings. It lias been decided to 
conduct the exhibit during at least two 
or three evenings of the week, which 
will afford an opportunity to many of 
the foundry operatives of the Pittsburg 
district to attend the show. 

The cost of space has been fixed at a 
minimum of only 50 cents per square 



Eoot, with an additional cost of $10 for 
corners. An exhibition permit, for which 
a charge of $25 will be made, will also 
be required by all exhibitors, as well as 
those conducting business of any kind in 
the exposition buildings. The large 
music hall on these grounds has been 
obtained for one evening during the 
week for a high-class entertainment to 
he given by the Foundry and Machine 
Exhibition Co. The headquarters for 
the exhibitors will be at the Fort Pit I 

hotel. 

During this week the annual conven- 
tions of the American Foundrynien's 
Association, American Brass Founders' 
Association and the Associated Foundry 
Foremen will be held in Pittsburg, and 
the attendance of foundrymen from all 
over the United States and Canada 
promises to be unusually large. As this 
city is the centre of the steel manufac- 
turing industry of the United States, 
and as some of the foundries in this 
district are among the largest and most 
modern in the country, unusual oppor- 
tunities will be afforded foundrymen to 
familiarize themselves with the practice 
of these works and an extensive plant 
visitation program is now being out- 
lined. 



BREAKING OF GATE IN MOLD. 

Experienced molders always know 
what the breaking of the gate in a mold 
before dumping means. It always indi- 
cates, in brass or bronze, that the metal 
is not good and that it contains impur- 
ities which render it red-short. By the 
breaking of the gate in the mold is 
meant that it breaks or cracks itself 
while cooling. In good metal, it remains 
firm so that when the mold is dumped, 
the castings, gate and runner are solid. 

There are several elements that will 
cause red-shortness in brass or bronze, 
but sulphur is the principal one. As it 
causes red-shortness in iron or steel, 
so it produces tlte same result in the 
copper alloys. 

Sulphur is very readily introduced 
into bronze or brass by the fuel, and es- 
pecially when coke or coal, instead of 
charcoal, is used as the covering for the 
metal in the crucible. These fuels al- 
ways contain more or less sulphur which 
is introduced into the metal to a greater 
or less extent. Charcoal, however, con- 
tains no sulphur and this is why it is 
so good a covering for molten metals. 

If molders are experiencing difficulty 
from bad castings and the reason is not 
clear, let it be noticed whether the gate 
cracks in the mold, and if so look for 
the presence of sulphur in the metal. 
It has been found to be the cause of 
some of the difficulties encountered in 
the brass foundry. — Brass World. 



INDUSTRIAL \ CONSTRUCTION NEWS 



Establishment or Enlargement of Factories, Mills, Power Plants, Etc.; Construc- 
tion of Railways, Bridges, Etc.; Municipal Undertakings ; Mining News. 



FOCNDB1 \M> MACHINE SHOP. 
MONTREAL The Montreal Harbor Com- 
'i has purchased a block of property 
near the river, on Notre Dame Street, Re- 
palr shops will be ereeted. 

OXFORD, N.S.— The Oxford Foundry .V 
.Machine Co. have the contract for the beat- 
ing equipment for the Bank of Nova Scotia's 

new building here. 

WELLAND. 0NT. The Robertson Machin- 
ery Co. lias made an assignment to J. F. 
Uross, for the general benefit of its creditors. 
The company has been insolvent for some 
time. 

GALT- The Gait Foundry Co. have their 
i.cii plant completed and expect to take off 
the first heat in a feu days. Win. F. Demill, 
formerly of Clark & Demill, Ilespeler, is man- 
ager of tbe new eompauy. A. J. Colviu is 
ted with him. 

WINDSOR, ONT. — Plans are being drawn 
for a uew dry-dock at Amherstburg, with a 
000-foot capacity. It is also intended to have 
a Shipbuilding plant, with the necessary ma- 
chine shops. Windsor. Amherstburg and To- 
ronto capitalists are interested in the scheme, 
which will cost about $250,000. 

CALGARY, ALTA— Mayor Mitchell advo- 
cates the erectiou of a municipal repair shop. 
He is of the opinion that much time and 
money is lost through sendiug small jobs to 
outside machine shops for repairs, instead of 
having a couple of men and proper lnaehiu- 
eiv t.i handle them. 

WEST TORONTO— The C. 1'. R. bas secur- 
ed a permit for the erection of a $20,000 re- 
pair shop here, on the west side of Keele 
Street, north of the subway. 

LETHBRIDGE, ALTA.— Donovan & McCrea 
are erecting a building at Bow Island to be 
used for a machinery business. 

HESPELER, ONT.— W. Ewald, of I'reston, 
has been appointed manager of the Ilespeler 
Machinery Co.'s shop. 

GOWGANDA, ONT.— Tfie machine shop at 
the Bartlett mines here was destroyed by 
lire recently. 

MONTREAL— The Canadian Rotary Ma- 
chine Co. will locate here. 

THE WATEROUS ENGINE WORKS have 
submitted building specifications for an addi- 
tion to their present factory, to cost (45,000. 

MAISONNEUVE, QUE.— Street construction 
work has just been commenced on the new 
S100.000 building being erected (or the Dnlt- 
ed States Shoe Machinery Co. The masonry 
and carpentering contracts are the only ones 
let. in addition to the foundation and steel 
construction. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The Western Steel Cor- 
poration have purchased 300 acres on tin- 
south side of the Frnser river. About $2,- 
000.000 will be expended on construction of 
buildings and wharves and instalation of 
machinery. 

MONTREAL — The National Steel Co. arc 
erecting a large plant at Longue Polnte, to 

COSt one million dollars. General contract 
awarded to I'eter Lyall & Sons. 

MORRISBURG, o.\T.- The Tack Factory 
has now thirty machines In operation, and 
twenty more have just arrived. There is also 
in operation one shoe nail machine with a 
Capacity of one-half ton a day. Mr. Russell 
has just returned from Toronto, where be 
secured orders amounting to over nine tons. 
Two more expert tack makers have arrived, 
and are now at work. 

HALIFAX. N.S. Fred M. Brown, formerly 

of the Steel Co., whose appointment as vice- 
lent and general manager of the Nova 
Scotia car works was announced recently, is 

here. Mr. Brown is a Montreal boy and lias 
a thorough grasp of mechanical affairs, as 
well as a mastery of the details necessary to 

tin- discbarge of the dul purchasing 

' in a great company like the Dominion 

steel Corporation. 

MONTREAL— New plans of the C. 1'. R., as 
announced by W. Whyte, here. Include loo 
miles of double-tracking and 800 miles or 

new track In the west. New yards will be 
laid out at I'.egina. Moose .law anil Medicine 
Four new steel bridges will be erected. 
Old 80 pound rails on the Manitoba and 
Northwestern branch will be replaced by «)- 
pound steel for n distance of about 160 tulles 
OWEN BOUND, ONT A Cleveland firm is 



contemplating the erection of a cold-pressed 
steel works here. 

BROCKVILLE, ONT.— Wm. J. Nute & Sons 
have purchased the boiler works owned by 
Black Bros. The uew firm will manufacture 
boilers, hot water heaters and do general re- 
pair work. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— W. Price, of Seattle, 
general manager of the Western Steel Cor- 
poration, proposes to start the construction 
of a $500,000 merchant steel plant near Sud- 
bury by April 1. The directors have secured 
I acres. 

WELLAND, ONT.— The Canadian Auto- 
matic Transportation Co., with head office in 
Toronto, will erect a plant here for the manu- 
facture of automatic carriers. The principal 
product is a storage battery truck scale for 
handling freight. 

COBOURG, ONT.— A new mill has been 
elected for the Provincial Steel Co. here, 
and machinery is being installed. 

MONTREAL— Foss & Fuller, machinery 
dealers, have dissolved. 

TORONTO. ONT.— Application has been 
made to the Provincial Secretary of Ontario 
on behalf of the Timmins-McMartin-Dunlop 
Syndicate for a charter for a milling, con- 
centrating and refining company of $500,000 
capital stock. The name of the company is 
to be the Porcupine Gold Mining Co. It is 
proposed to erect at once a mill having 30 
stamps at the outset, and so built as to en- 
able its capacity to be easily increased upon 
demand. Besides working on the ore of the 
mining interests associated in the company, 
the plant will be used on custom business. 

HALIFAX, N.S. — The city council has voted 
to give exemption from taxation for 20 years 
to the Nova Scotia Car Works, which is to 
take over the works of the SilliUer Car Co. 
Also the new company is to receive free from 
the citv 5.000,000 gol.' of water every year. 

CALGARY. ALTA.— The Board of Trade is 
in communication with American inquirers 
who are considering the establishment here 
of works for the manufacture of gas engines, 
stoves and heating apparatus. 

GALT, (INT.— The Gait Foundry Co., whose 
new premises were completed this month are 
already making castings for the trade. 

TORONTO— The Fairbanks-Morse Co. have 
taken out permits for a new $13,000 foundry 
and foundry cleaning and pattern room, at 
1363-1389 P.loor Street West. 

WETBTJRN, SASK — The Birrell Motor 
Plow Co., of Winnipeg, are negotiating with 
the authorities regarding the establishment 
.if a factory here. 

TORONTO. ONT.— J. L. Richardson & Co., 
dealers in machinists' and foundry supplies, 
have assigned to Richard Tew. 

REGTNA, SASK.— The Holt Caterpillar Co., 
of Stockton. California, will establish a dis- 
tributing centre here in the spring for their 
traction engines. 

LONDON. ONT. An automobile factory is 
to be located here. Hugh Kennedy, of Gait, 
and W. J. and Frank Reid. of this city, are 
interested. 

GANANOQFE, ONT. -The D. F. .Tones Co. 
has added a night gang and is keeping its 
rolling mills in constant operation. 

AMHERST, N.S. -Extensive improvements 
are being made in the shops of the Canada 
Tar Co. here. There are orders on hand to 
keep the works husv till next .Tune. 

ST. STEPHEN, N.B.- The Maritime Edge 
Tool Co.. here, has made large additions to 
its fnctorv. 

ORTLLIA, ONT. The Canadian Refining & 
Smelting Co. has its building up, and is put- 
ting in the- plant for treating high-grade Co- 
balt ore. 
SHERBROOKE, QUE. The Canadian Fair- 
Co., manufacturers of weigh scales, will 
double the manufacturing capacity of their 
plant here. 

QUEBEC. P.Q. The Dorchester Electric Co. 

build machine shops here, at a cost of 
S.'OOOOO. 

CHATHAM, o\T. Tbe DOWSley Spring & 
,\vie Co. is making extensions to its plant. 

OTTAWA. ONT. Henderson Bros., of Hru- 
ton. England, have decided to establish a 
fnctorv In Ottawa for the manufacture anil 
halr-cioth machines and patent horizontal 
saws. 



LONDON, ONT.— The Superior Machinery 
Co. has obtained a charter. 

TORONTO, ONT.— Sellew Motors, Ltd., has 
obtained a charter. 

VICTORIA, B.C. — Among tbe companies 
either licensed or registered during the last 
week of December to do business in British 
Columbia, are the Burrill Rock Drill Co.. 
Record Foundry & Machine Co., Hallidie Ma- 
chinery Co. 

JOLIETTE, QUE.— The Joliette Steel & 
Iron Foundry is the name of a new manu- 
facturing concern at Joliette, Que. The com- 
pany intend dealing in machinery aud sup- 
plies, steel and iron castings of all kinds. 
They have opened au office aud show room 
in Montreal, under the management of J. D.. 
Query. The new company has absorbed the' 
business formerly carried on by the Joliette 
Foundry Co. They also contemplate manu- 
facturing some specialties in the near future. 

HAMILTON — Fire, supposed to have been 
caused by the ignition of crude oil used to 
facilitate the handling of rolled steel, com- 
pletely destroyed the Hamilton Steel & Iron 
Company's rolling mills, at the corner of 
Queen and Barton, recently. The frame shell, 
in which the valuable rolls, furnaces and hot 
beds were located, was burned to the ground. 
The forge and axle department, which is situ- 
ated immediately west of the mills, was .also 
badly damaged. The loss is estimated at 
$12,000. 

LONDON — Alexander Gauld, brass finisher 
at the Labatt Box Co., is organizing a foun- 
dry company here, which promise to employ 
in a short time 100 men. The output of the 
foundry will consist of all sorts of plumb- 
ers' castings, pipings, etc. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT.— The Steel & 
Radiation Co., of Toronto, has agreed to 
erect a new factory here, to begin active 
operations by the end of the year, employing 
100 men with an annual wage roll of $50,000 
for the first three years, and afterwards 250 
men with an annual wage roll of $125,000. The 
city gives the company a site of 35 acres, with 
a fixed assessment of $5,000 for three years 
and $10,000 for the next seven years. 

ELECTRICAL NOTES*. 

TORONTO— Debentures to the amount of 
one million dollars will shortly be issued by 
the city in connection with the construction 
of the civic power plant. 

VICTORIA, B.C.— The electric lighting by- 
law ($25,000> was carried. 

CALGARY, ALTA.— The machinery at the 
big dam of the Calgary Power Co., on the 
Bow river at Kanannskis, is nearly all in- 
stalled, and if nothing unforeseen occurs the 

npany will be in a position to supply 

power in Calgary by the date agreed upon, 
April 1. 1911, 

SASKATOON— E. L. White, city electrician, 
has prepared estimates calling for an expendi- 
ture of $140,656 for a light and power plant. 
The proposed changes would double the ca- 
pacity of the works,. 

WINDSOR, ONT.— Windsor has seen red the 
Canadian branch of the Moloney Electric Co., 
of St. Louis, Mo. The Moloney Company 
manufacture electrical machinery on an ex- 
tensive scale. They are erecting a temporary 
building, in which manufacturing will prob- 
able start within two months. 

ELKO, B.C.— The British Columbia Elec- 
tric Co. will uild a plant here for developing 

GRAND FALLS. N.B.— The Maine & N. B. 
Electrical Power Co., of St. John, N.B., will 
build a new line here and erect a large power 
plant. 

HESPELER, ONT.— A municipal electric 

lighting system will be installed here. 

OTTAWA. ONT. - The Ottawa Electric Rail- 
wav is building a new power house. 

WATERLOO, ONT. $50,000 will be spent 
on an electric lighting plant here. 

OTTAWA. ONT. -American and English 
capitalists will establish an electric smelting 
plant at Chat's Falls, on the Ottawa river, in 
the spring. 

PORCUPINE CITY, ONT.— C. L. Sherrill, 
of Buffalo, is preparing to erect a power plant 
here to facilitate the development of this dis- 
trict. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



63 



CAMROSE, ALTA.— The municipnlity-ownerl 
power plant here Iims been opened and is 
ihi» in operation. 

STBATHCONA, ALT A.— Steps are being 
taken to increase the capacity of the muni- 
cipal electrical plant. About $70,000 worth 
..f machinery will be purchased, including a 
COO kilowatt generator and engine and the 
necessary boilers. 

KINGSTON, ONT. — Mr. Beach, of Iroquois, 
has options on water powers adjacent to 
Calabogie, Renfrew Co., Que. He is planning 
two generating plants, a main one at High 
Falls and a secondary one at Brockville. 

WELLAND, ONT.— The Falls Power Co. 
has sold its lighting system to the Welland 
metrical Co. This includes the street light- 
ing here. 

PORT HOPE, ONT.— A by-law granting a 
30-year franchise to the Seymour Electric 
Tower Co. has been carried. 

WINNIPEG— The Winnipeg Electric Rail- 
way has secured a permit for a new turbine 
power building, the estimated cost being $72,- 
000. It will have a turbine engine of 12, 000 
Morse-power. 

INGERSOLL, ONT.— The by-law to ap- 
point a commission to control the electric 
light and power utility was carried. 

GRAND FALLS— The Grand Falls Power 
Co., of which Sir William C. Van Home is 
one of the leading spirits, is preparing to 
begin active operations towards the develop- 
ment of a big industry at the Falls. 

WINNIPEG, MAN.— The Board of Control 
accepted the tender of the Seamens Dynamo 
Works, Toronto, for the 500-kilowatt genera- 
tor sets for the power station. Their tender 
amounted to $16,410. 

BROCKVILLE, ONT.— 3. Wesley Allison, of 
the New York & Ontario Co., states that 
drills, boring machines, boilers and hoisting 
apparatus for the power plant at Wadding: 
ton. were now being secured, so that work 
could be commenced early in the spring, and 
that electrical machinery, water wheels and 
other machinery necessary had been con- 
tracted for. 

BRANTFORD, ONT— Hal Donly, Simcoe; 
W. S. Brewster, R. E. Ryerson, John Muir 
and W. D. Schultz, of Brantford, are appli- 
cants for a charter for an electrical radial 
line from Brantford to Port Dover. 

r.OWMANVILLE, ONT.— The plebiscite in 
favor of the electric light being managed by 
commissioners carried. 

BROCKVILLE, ONT.— The by-law to amal- 
gamate the light and water commissioners 
carried. 

MEDICINE HAT, ALTA— The new electric 
power house here has been completed and 
machinery is being installed. A regulator 
station is being erected near the power house. 
WEYBTJRN, SASK.— Owing to delay in the 
arrival of machinery, the new power house 
:nnl electric service will not be ready for 
use until March. 

ST. JOHN. N.B.— The Maine & New Bruns- 
wick Electrical Power Co. will build a line 
from its plant at Aroostook Falls to Lime- 
Stone, Van Buren and St. Leonards, running 
near Grand Falls. Besides selling power to 
the towns, it is the object of the company to 
furnish energy for the construction of the 
large paper mill to be built on the St. John 
river at Grand Falls. 

WINNIPEG. MAN.— It is reported that pri- 
vate corporations, believed to be backed up 
by C. N. R. interests, are securing every 
available hydro-electric site on the Winnipeg 
river below Lac du Bonnett and Point du 
BoiS, where the city is completing its $2,000,- 
oon power plant. There is a rumor to the 
effect that it is planned to underbid the city 
in the sale of surplus power. 

HAMILTON. ONT.— The Hamilton & Port 
I (over Electric Railway Co.. which has ob- 
tained provincial charter to construct an elec- 
tric line between Hamilton and Port Dover, 
at an estimated cost Of SI. 000.000. will build 
its power bouse at Caledonia. George Lynch 
Staunton, K.C., Hamilton, is to be president 
of the company. 

OTTAWA. ONT.- Sparks Street, in this city. 
Is to have a "White Way." The municipal 
electric department has charge of Installing 
the service and expects to have the lights go- 
ing before the end of January. 

QUEBEC, P.Q. The Dorchester Electric Co. 
has obtained the consent of the municipal 
authorities to extend its system into this 

city aid sell electricity. 

HAMILTON, ONT.— The directors of the 
Dominion Power ,V Transmission Co. have 
placed an order with the Canadian Westing- 
bouse Co. for a new generator, to be installed 
at the firmer company's power works at De 
Cern Falls. The capacity of the generator is 
to be 8,500 h.p.. and its cost to be $'200,000. 
The power company is also arranging to 
build another sub-station in Hamilton. This 
will cost $100,000. 



BOWMANVILLE, ONT.— A franchise was 

voted to the Seymour Power & Electric Co. 
in this town, on Dec. 27. 

PETERBORO, ONT.— The Can. Gen. Elec. 

Co. will construct a power house on the 

waterworks dam, near here. Bids are now 
being received. 

NEW COMPANIES. 

TORONTO, ONT.— The Augustine Auto- 
matic Rotary Engine Co., capitalized at $1,- 
000,000 lias been incorporated. 

LONDON, ONT.— The "Superior Machinery 
Co." has been incorporated. The promoters 
are J. Fitzgerald, E. W. Scott, G. E. Scott, and 
T. Bryan, manufacturers, and J. B. P. Tan- 
ton, merchant, all of this place. They have 
taken over the business formerly known as 
The Superior Repairing and Mfg. Co. and will 
deal in all kinds of machinery. The head 
office will be here. 

TORONTO, ONT.— Barr Registers Co., has 
been incorporated with capital of $50,000. 
They will manufacture registers and store 
devices. Among the directors are W. H. 
Matthews, A. E. Bywater and J. A. Steveu- 
son, M.D., of Trenton. 

ST. JOHN, N.B.— C. J. Salmon, W. G. Salm- 
on, H. G. Adams, M. A. Hatheway and G. 
Dodge, of St. John, are applying for incorpor- 
ation as "The Globe Steam Laundry, Ltd.," 
to be located here. 

OTTAWA, ONT.— The North Fork Power 
Co. have been incorporated. 

The Byrnes Mfg. Co., of Collingwood, has 
been incorporated. They will carry on a 
wood-working business. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The North American 
Lumber Co. has been incorporated in British 
Columbia. The manager, H. L. Jenkins, has 
his head office here in the B. C. Trust Block, 
on Pender Street. 

HAMILTON — Hamilton Machinery Co., 
Hamilton, Ont., have been incorporated to 
carry on business of mechanical engineers 
and manufacturers of machinery, with a 
capital stock of forty thousand dollars. Those 



or 



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ADDRESS 

Norton Company 

CHIPPAWA, ONT. 





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Cleveland, Ohio. 



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PennBldg., Philadelphia, Pa, U.S.A. 



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A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



64 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




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ESTABLISH A MODERN TAX- 
FREE ALCOHOL DISTILLERY 

We have a Good Proposition for Motor Mfrs. 

Having exported our StilU in large amounts for many years, and already having 

several far Eastern agencies we are now open to establish additional agencies and invite 

;>ondence to that end, looking after our old customers and prospective buyers by 

special successful demonstrative methods for making Alcohol. Apple Jack. Aguardiente, 

i. Teguila. Tench Brandy. Whiskey, etc. Most modern and simple. All sizes, 5 to 

500 gallons daily capacity distilling apparatus. 

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR Information Mating to INDUSTRIAL or DENATURED 
AI.roHOL DISTILLING APPARATUS and the amazing possibilities of the utilization 
of waste farm products and wood waste by superheated steam distillation, the distilling 
apparatus as used by us : the principle involved, also the methods of chemical control 
and disposal of the product and by-products ? We will gladly say to you : 

Denatured Alcohol to-day is of the greatest untold benefit to the American motor 
people. It opens an absolutely new field for investment for progressive paper pulp and 
chemical fibre mills, paint, varnish, soap and candle makers, gardeners, farms and 
garbage plants, saw-mills, lumbermen and canneries. The Automobiles and the Navies 
of the world clamor for this new ta^freo cheaper industrial alcohol. May we expect 
some encouragement from the more patrotic pioneers for this new American Industry ? 
The field is new and profitable, and you can practically have the business your own 
way by starting now. We are makers of an apparatus for the production of this de- 
natured or industrial alcohol ; we build and Install plants— large or small. The initial 
cost of a plant is small : the financial risk— if any— is trifling. The equipment Is such 
that It can be added to at any time without disturbing the original installation. 
Address 

THE WOOD WASTE DISTILLERIES CO., Inc. 

WHEELING, W. VA., U.S.A. 



Incorporated are m. \v. Best, salesman, F. \\\ 
Woods, manufacturer, G. F. Webb, contrac 
tor, ail of Hamilton, Out., and N. B. Manclll, 
salesman, Vancouver, B.C., and R, F. Manclll, 
salesman, of Goderieh, Ont. 

MONTREAL— Standard Machines Co., ot 
Montreal, lias been Incorporated to manu- 
facture all kinds of -engines ami machines. 

G. V. Cousins and O. B. MacCallinii. barris- 
ters, P. F. Brown, stenographer, \v. R. Ford, 
clerk, S. T. Mains, bookkeeper, ail of Mon- 
treal. 

MONTREAL — Canadian Steel Foundries. 

head office at Montreal, have been In porat- 

ed to manufacture and ileal in machinery. G. 
O.Cousins and O. B. MacCallum, barristers, 
S. T. Mains, accountant, 1'. F. Brown, secre- 
tary, and W. R. FOrd, clerk, all of Montreal, 
are the incorporators. 

YK'TORIAVILLIC, QUE. —The Victorioville 

• 'liair Mfg. Co. has obtained a charter. 

ST. JOHN, N.B.— Michael Sullivan, of King- 
ston, has been awarded the contract to build 
the armory here. It is estimated the build- 
ing when completed will cost about xiiso.OOO 

SHERBROOKE, QUE.— Simoneau and Dion 
have been awarded the $200,000 contract for 
an office building for the Quebec Railway. 
Heal and Power Co., at Quebec. The building 
must in mpleted by November. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The Investors' Guar- 
antee Corporation will erect a fifteen-storey 
block here at an estimated cost of $500,000. 

Vancouver, B.C.— The Hudson's Bay Co. 
propose to erect a six or eight storey steel 
building here. 

SUDBURY, ONT.— The Casey-Shaw Lum- 
ber Co. has obtained a charter. 

MONTREAL, QUE.- -Canadian Rotary Ma- 
chine Company, capital stock $(100,000. To 
control Wilbelm von l'ittler's system of ro- 
tary engines and machines in Canada. 

MONTREAL— National Bridge Co., Mon- 
treal, Que; capital stock. .$1,000,000. To 
carry on a general bridge building business 
and to erect the necessary plant. 
MUNICIPAL. 

PENTICTON, B.C.— By-laws in favor of the 
installation of a waterworks and electric 
lighting system were carried recently. 

ESQUIMALT, B.C.— The position of general 
manager of tbe Esquimau Waterworks Co. 

rendered vacant by tbe death Of T. Luhhe 
will not be filled, the directors undertaking 
the management of the business 

TORONTO, Out.— R. Chadwlck, the city's 
bridge engineer, has resigned to accept a 

position with a New York i tracting Arm. 

The Board of Control has appointed Mr. 
Cousins bis successor. 

WESTVILLE, N.S.— Tbe new pump has 
arrived from Toronto. Mr. Mclntyre of the 
Canada Foundry Co. will superintend the 
erection. 

SHERBROOKE, QUE.— The City Council 
has awarded the contract for power develop 

ment to Morrow and Beatbe. of Peterboro', 

their tender of $51,220 being tbe lowest. This 
amount covers the construction of the dam 
and [lower bouse. 

STRATIIROY, ONT.— The by-law to raise 
$0,000 for improvements to the electric light 
and waterworks systems carried. 

ORILLIA, ONT. -The by-law granting the 
Canada Refining & Smelting Co. certain privi- 
leges was carried. 

GODERICH, ONT.— Tbe by-law to raise 
$26,000 by debentures for the building of a 
storm sewer and referendum towards build- 
ing new municipal buildings were both car- 
ried. 

EDMONTON, M/I'A. The City Council 
provisionally passed debenture by-laws to 
raise and expend $456,000 on public works. 

These include $1(17.000 for a bridge over the 
Saskatchewan River. 

STRATIK 'UNA. ALTA. -Tenders addressed 
to David Ewfng, chief engineer power house, 
here, for Engine. Boilers and Generators will 
be received up to March 1st. 1911. Specifica- 
tions may be bad from tbe citv engineer, 
A. .1. McLean. 

OTTAWA. It is a uticed here that a 

new steel bridge will be built over the Ottawa 
river at Temiskamiug. The Federal Gov- 
ernment will contribute $50,000, Quel sir,. 

000 and Ontario an nmonnl to be fixed later. 
NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C. The Second 
Narrows' bridge connecting up the north and 
south shores of I'.urrnrd Inlet with a pro- 
posed $1,250,000 traffic and railway bridge Is 
now a8SUred since the •■lectors have voted the 

necessary funds. 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE— The city council 
has appointed a special committee to ascer- 
tain the possibility of purchasing a central 
electric light and gas plant with the view of a 
municipal owned plant to furnish the city 
with light and power. 

VICTORIA, B.C. On the recommendation 
of the water commissioner, the city will pur- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



65 



chase 473 Trident Water meters of various 
sizes at a cost of $7,500; 15,000 feet of 12 in., 
10,000 feet of 8 in., 35,000 feet of (i in., 80,000 
feet of 4 in. Munncssiuan's steel tubes at a 
cost of $80,000; and 400 gate valves of various 
sizes at an estimated cost of $4,000; and 15 
tons of pig lead. These supplies will be used 
in extensions Of the distribution system. 

HARRISTON, ONT. A complete new 
waterworks system is being installed here. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT.— $180,000 will be 
spent on the waterworks plaut here. 

NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C.— The munici- 
pality is in the market for $50,000 worth of 
east-iron pipe. 

PEMBROKE, ONT.— The municipality is in 
the market for 6,000 feet of 18-iuch lapwelded 
or riveted steel piping. 

NELSON, B.C.— The city will install man- 
ual training equipment in the schools here. 
Machine-tool equipment will be required. 

BIDGETOWN, ONT.— The plebiscite for 
waterworks carried. 

OWEN SOUND, ONT.— The by-law to re- 
build two bridges was carried. 

MITCHELL, ONT.— A by-law to run the 
municipal electric light and waterworks by a 
commission carried. 

HAKKISTON, ONT.— The by-law for muni- 
cipal waterworks carried. 

WESTON, ONT.— The by-luw for a com- 
mission to manage the electric lights and 
waterworks was carried. 

VICTORIA, B.C.— The $150,000 waterworks 
loan by-law and Sooke Lake by-law both 
carried. 

TORONTO.— The city will apply for legis- 
lation to issue debentures to raise $626,544 
for a new waterworks intake pipe, a six-foot 
steel conduit, and the necessary additional 
pumping mains. 

SAt'LT AU RECOLLET, QUE.— A modern 
waterworks system will likely be installed 
here in the near future. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The ratepayers have 
authorized the issue of $400,000 of debentures 
for waterworks extension. 

WINNIPEG, MAN.— Tenders will be re- 
ceived up to 11 a.m., on Monday, February 
nth, 1911, for the manufacture, delivery and 
erection complete of two pumping plants each 
Of a capacity of one million imperial gallons 
per 24 hours. Specifications, forms of tenders 
may be obtained at the o%ce of the City En- 
gineer, 223 James Avenue, Winnipeg. 

BROCKVILLE, ONT.— The municipally 
owned waterworks system here shows a net 
surplus for the past year of $2,406.92. 

BOWMANVILLE, ONT.— The indebtedness 
of $19,280 incurred by the late Durham Rub- 
ber Co. with this municipality and taken over 
by the Goodyear Tire Co., of Canada, has 
been wiped out by the carrying of a by-law- 
granting a bonus of an equal amount. A 
partial exemption from taxation and a fixed 
assessment have also been granted the Good- 
year Company. 

CALGARY, ALTA. — Commissioner Graves 
estimates that between 25 and 30 miles of 
water mains will be laid during the present 
year. The waterworks for 1910 shows a sur- 
plus of $3,335.36. 

BOWMANVILLE, ONT.— This municipality 
is considering the installation of waterworks. 
The proposed source of water supply is from 
springs seven miles distant. John Lyle, clerk. 

Saw Mill and Planing Mill News. 

TUOROLD, ONT.— The Colonial Wood 
Products Co. has just erected an addition, 72 
by 45 feet, to its mill to provide for addition- 
al wet machine capacity, enabling it to in- 
e the output of mechanically ground 
I pulp. This company commenced oper- 
ating in February and the extension referred 
s been necessitated by the demand for 
round wood. The plant is operated 
electrically, having two grinders at present 
tour wet machines. 

'IIARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I.— The wood- 
Working steam mills of Barnard Creamer, of 
Souris, have been totally destroyed by fire. 
I">ss. $8,000. No insurance. Another mi'), 
that of M. F. Schurman and Co., Summer- 
side, was also burned. 

LETHBRIDGE, ALTA.— Becker and Vales, 
with headquarters here, will open a lumber 
yard, and do a general lumber business. 

'FORT FRANCES, ONT.— Work has com- 
menced on the new milts of the Shevliu- 
Clarke Co., here. The erection will be com- 
plete by June 1st. 

RICHMOND, QUE.— Messier & Desmarais 
have purchased the Haslett portable saw mill 
plant at Tronholmville ana will remove it 
to Richmond and make additions to the 
plant. 

STEWART, B.C.— The Portland Canal Min- 
ing Co. are building a new saw mill here. 

KIXSELLA.— W. n. Kennelv is starting a 
lumber yard here. 



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TORONTO, ONT. 




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Cincinnati and Milford, Ohio, U.S.A. 



66 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




"CUSHMAN CHUCKS 



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Brantford, Canada 




CHILLIWACK, B.C.— The Abbotsford Tim- 
ber and Trading Co. are opening a lumber 
yard here. 

GOLDEN CITY, B.C.— The now mill of the 
Columbia River Lumber Co., hero. has been 
enclosed and the placing of machinery is bp- 
nif.' proceeded with. A turbine engine will 
furnish the power. 

FORT GEORGE, B.C.— Three move saw 
mills will be established In this district and 
be in readiness for operations) In the spring. 
Two of these will be located on the Nechaco 
river and the third on the l""aser river, six 
miles above Fort George. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— The lumber mill and 
limits of the Salmon River Lumber Co. in 
Langlev municipality have been sold to the 
Western Lumber and Shingle « o., with he*! 
office in Vancouver, for $60 000. The pur- 
chasers have placed Mr. Mitchell In charge. 
it is their intention to operate the mill and 

possibly install a Shingle mill and dry kiln. 

RIDGETOWN, ONT.— The -Mills of the 
Howard Cooperage and Lumbar Co. will be 

re-opened, having been closed for two years. 

Lumber, baskets, veneer nid tish boxes will 

be handled. 

DAUPHIN, MAN— T. A Burrows of this 

place will build u large saw mill on the 
McLeod River. 2G miles west of Wolf Creek. 
Building operations will be commenced this 
winter. 

CHATHAM, N.B.— .T. B. Snowball Co. are 
altering and extending their large saw mill 
here. It has been lengthened 32 feet, and a 
filing room added. Two of the three gang 
saws will be replaced by an eight-inch band 
mill, a seven-Inch re-saw band, and a twin 
rotary slabber. 

New Westminster, B.C. — Galbraith & Sons 
intend erecting a saw mill and factory on 
Lulu Island. The saw mill is to be 40 by 225 
by CO feet. The plant is to be up-to-date, 
having a large dry lumber shed 45 by 65 feet, 
dry house .'!0 by 120 foot, and a loading plant 
.",(1 by 40 feet. The mill will be a three-storey 
one. 

CARIBOU. N.B.— S. W. Collins & Son's 
lumber mill hero baok of the Vaughn House, 
was wholly destroyed by fire recently. The 
loss was $7,000, insurance $1,000. This mill 
may not be rebuilt, as a mill in that spot is 
said to be not a very profitable proposition. 

OWEN SOUND, ONT.— The Galbraith- 
I'.n instead syndicate are rushing the work on 
their new planing mill, sash and door fac- 
tory here. Approved mill construction is be- 
ing used. 

I.ETHBRIDGE, ALTA— The Farmers Lum- 
ber Co. are building a lumber yard here. 

General Manufacturing 

MOOSE JAW, SASK.— The Western Manu- 
facturing Co., Regina, has purchased the 
Saskatchewan Sash and Door Co., here, aud 
will make additions to the plant. 

ORILLIA, ONT.— The Canada Keg & Barrel 
Co. will commence the erection of factory 
buildings here in the early spring. A site of 
5 acres has been granted by the town. 

BERLIN, ONT.— The L. McBrine Co., trunk 
manufacturers, and the Art Glass Co., are 
each planning to construct large additions to 
their present factories. In addition, the Felt 
Boot and Rubber Manufacturers will build 
a box factory for their own use. 

REGINA, SASK.— The Massey-Harris Co. 
an- building a track warehouse here, 00x18 
feet and two storeys high. They will also 
build track warehouses at Swift Current 
and Areola. 

REGINA SASK.— The Sawyer-Massey Co., 
of Hamilton, will erect a warehouse and dis- 
tributing agency here. The construction will 
hi' of brick and steel throughout with con- 
crete floors. The building is to be steam- 
beated. 

SAKNIA, ONT.— II. Diver has purchased a 
site from the Cleveland-Sarnia Saw Mills 
Co., and will commence the establishment of 
a new industry here. The new firm will 
manufacture doors, especially of the better 
■ lass, veneered and fancy hardwood. The 
main building will be 80x200 feet, two storeys 
in height, and of reinforced concrete. There 
will be a storage building of 20x200 feet, dry 
kilns of cOxOO foot, and a building for the 
steam power plant of 40x80 feet. Work on 
il. erection of the new structure will be com- 
menced forthwith. 

RIDGETOWN, ONT.— T. G. Johnston has 
taken nn interest in the Leltch basket works. 
A new veneer machine, rip saw", new boiler 
and engine will be placed in the factory. 

LONDON, ONT.— A larce knitting concern 
the United States has leased a building 
here and will commence operations in the 
near future. 

OTTAWA. ONT.— The Beaver Board Co., of 
Buffalo, NY., has purchased land In Ottawa 
upon which to erect a factory for the making 




W?laniiracizirer$ 

MALLEABLE 

• IRON • 
CASTINGS 



TWO PLANTS °| 
(gP^* 1 8000 TONS J 

Smith's Falls Ontario 

ETFROSr, PRBSlDEHr 




SIMONDS 



(SI-MONDS) 




Hack 

Saw 

Blades 



For both 
Hand and 
Power 
Machine 
Use. 



Steel 
blades 
for cut- 
ting steel. 
Hard, 
tough, 
even-tem- 
pered blades. 
Buy a gross of 
Simonds Hack 
Saw Blades to- 
day for trial, or 
write for quantity 
prices and discounts. 



Simonds Canada Saw 
Co., Limited 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

St. John, N.B. Vancouver, B.C. 

In the United States, Simonds Mfg. Co. 



CANAEIAN MACHINERY 



67 



JOHN J. GARTSHORE 

83 Front 8t. W., Toronto 

PAN Q and SUPPLIES 

r\/"\IL— O New and Secondhand 

For RAILWAY8, TRAMWAY8, Etc 
Old Material Bought and Sold. 



PATTERNS AND MODELS. 




^ALL KINDS — 

Difficult' Core Work a Specially 
High Grade • Right' Prices • Prompt" Delivery 

SAT/S/KACTO&r WORK GUARANTEED 

THE HAMILTON PATTERN WORKS 

258 CATHERINE. STREET NORTH 

HAMILTON . ONT. 



FOR 

'ALL KINDS OF MACHINE 

WORK. MADE IN 

WOOD, BRA55 

WHITE METAL OR IRON 

by the very highest class of skilled 
mechanics. 

Only the highest grade of material 
used in our work. We can handle 
your pattern work to your complete 
satisfaction. 
Let us quote prices. 



TORONTO PATTERN WORKS 
87 Jd\rvi55t.Toroi2to.,Canaid& 









^^HAWLTdN;OiMf 



of fireproof boarding to take the place of lath 
and plaster. 

MONTREAL. QUE.— The pulp and paper 
mills to be established by Price Bros. & Co., 
on the Riviere au Sable, and for the building 
of which $5,000,000 has recently been raised 
by tbe sale of the company's bonds in Lon- 
don, are to be ready for operation by June, 
1912. The new industries are expected to 
bring into existence at that point a town of 
4.000 or 5,000 inhabitants. A water power de- 
velopment that can be depended on to main- 
tain 14,000 h.p. will be begun as soon as 
possible. 

AMHERST, N.S.— The Amherst Boot & 
Shoe Co., whose plant turns out 1,000 pairs a 
day, is doubling its manufacturing capacity. 

Building Notes. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— Extensive alterations 
will be commenced in the spring on the 
abattoir and packing plant of P. Burns & Co. 
About $200,000 will be expended. 

VANCOUVER, B.C.— Mr. Lester will erect 
a $100,000 six-storey building here in the 
spring. Up-to-date equipment will be a fea- 
ture of the building throughout. 

PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.— The Pacific Con- 
struction Co., of Victoria, B.C., has been 
awarded the contract for the marine depart- 
ment depot here. The contract price is $150,- 
000. 

ONT. — The International 
have let a contract for a 
their plant to G. E. Mills. 



H 



-The C.P.R. will erect 



HAMILTON, 
Harvester Co. 
new office at 
Cost, $40,000. 

CALGARY, ALTA.- 
a big hotel here. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT.— The city has de- 
cided to give 35 acres of free land to the Steel 
and Radiation, Limited. The company will 
spend $50,000 on buildings. 

REGINA, SASK.— Hand Bros. & Nellermoe 
Co., of Winnipeg, will erect a $50,000 imple- 
ment warehouse here. The headquarters of 
the firm will be moved here. 

REGINA, SASK.— The Toronto Type Foun- 
dry Co., of Toronto, are preparing plans for 
a $20,000 warehouse. It will have steam heat- 
ing, plumbing and an electric hoist. 

TORONT, ONT.— The C.P.K. will erect at 
the corner of King and Yonge streets, a six- 
teen storey building, costing over $1,000,000. 
It will be of steel, faced with glazed terra 
cotta and will be one of the finest office 
buildings in the world. 

SASKATOON, ALTA.— The Canadian Pair- 
banks Co. will erect a block here on Twenty- 
Third Street. 

SASKATOON, ALTA.— The International 
Harvester Co. have a scheme in view which 
will extend their premises considerably. It 
is also stated that the J. I. Case Co. will 
build in this city. 

SASKATOON, ALTA.— The American-Abell 
Engine and Thresher Co. also intend locating 
here. They have erected offices and a ware- 
house opposite the C.P.R. depot. 

SASKATOON, ALTA.— The Hart-Parr Co.. 
of Charles City, Iowa, manufacturers of oil 
and gasoline traction plow engines have lo- 
cated offices here as headquarters for North- 
ern Saskatchewan and Northern Manitoba. 

MONTREAL, QUE.— The Engineers' Club 
will make extensive improvements to their 
clubhouse here. The plans call for an ex- 
penditure of $100,000. 

MEDICINE HAT. ALTA.— The Alberta Lin- 
seed Oil and Paint Co. will erect a plant here. 
It will be fireproof, of brick and cement, ex- 
cepting elevators which shall be of the usual 
material. 

TORONTO, ONT.— The Central Y.M.C.A. 
will erect a new building here at a cost of 
from $300,000 to $400,000. It will be of fire- 
proof construction, with a steel frame, brick 
walls and fireproof floors and partitions. 

EDMONTON, ALTA.— MacDougall & Secord 
contemplate the erection of a ten-storey busi- 
ness block on the corner of First and Jasper 
Streets. The date of construction has not 
been decided upon. 

EDMONTON. ALTA.— Architect H. A. Ma- 
goon is preparing plans for a five-storey 
hotel to be built by J. B. Mercer, on present 
site of Orand Central Hotel. Cost about $100,- 
000. 

OTTAWA. ONT.— A new agricultural Im- 
plement and machinery hall at the exhibition 
grounds will be built this year at a cost of 
¥75.000. 

REOTXA. SASK. — Plans are ready for the 
new Donahue Block to be erected this spring 
on Eleventh Ave., at a cost of $100,000. It will 
be modern in every respect. 

ORILLIA. ONT.— The Canada Refining and 
Smelting Co. will extend its plant here. 

PRINCETON. B.C.— The British Columbia 
Portland Cement Co. is building a large plant 
here. 

ST. JOHN, N.B.— The Partington Pulp and 



In Close Quarters 



a 




Look at how our new Face Piste Jaws 
operate in close quarters, coming close to- 
gether at the centre like an ordinary chuck 
for holding small work. 




We make Face Plate Jaws from 4 to 
14 inches. 
BORING MILL JAWS in all sizes. 
LATHE CHUCKS of distinctly new designs 

WRITE FOB FULL DETAILS 

S. E. H0RT0N MACHINE CO. 

WINDSOR LOCKS, CONN., U.S.A. 

(Not the E. Horton & Son Co.) 

B W\ 



\A/A NT E D 

The Services of a Representative 

in Canada 

to look after our old customers and pros- 
pective buyers of our Modern, Simple, Tax- 
free Industrial Alcohol Distilling Apparatus, 
by special successful demonstrative methods 
for making Alcohol, Apple Jack, Aguardiente, 
Mescal, Teguila, Peach Brandy, Whiskey. 
Solidified Alcohol in Cubes, Etc.. also De- 
natured Alcohol. Most modern, simple. 5 
Gal. Still and all sizes to 500 Gal. Daily Cap- 
acities. Good Salary and Commission. Ad- 
dress with three references, 

THE WOOD WASTE DISTILLERIES CO., Inc. 
Wheeling, W. Va., U.S.A. 



STAMPINGS S 



No matter how hard a stamping problem you 
put up to us, the chances are we can satisfy 
you. Many people use stampings in place of 
castings and find them more satisfactory and 
often cheaper. Send blue prints and samples 
and let us quote you. 



The Silent Partner is an inter- 
esting little magazine. We send 
it free— when there's a reason 



THE GLOBE MACHINE & STAMPING GO. 

899 Hamilton Street Cleveland, 0. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 







The British Aluminium Co., Limited 

LONDON, - ENGLAND 

Beg to announce THE OPENING on 
October fifteenth, 1910, of their new 

Canadian Headquarters, at 24 Adelaide St. W., Toronto 

in charge of 

MESSRS. PARKE & LEITH, General Agents for Canada 

A Large Stock of Aluminium in all the Commercial Forms will 
be kept — Wholesale and Retail. 



JESSDP'S 



Best Tool Steel 

"ARK" High-Speed Steel 



THE FAVORITE BRANDS WITH USERS OF GOOD STEEL. 
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF SIZES IN STOCK. 
JESSOPS HIGH-GRADE FILES AND RASPS. 



80 Bay St., Toronto, Ontario 

Chas. L. Bailey, Agent. 

Reid-Newfoundland Company 

St. John's, Newfoundland. 



Jas. Robertson Co., Ltd 

Montreal, Quebec 
Jas. Robertson Co., Ltd., 
St. John, New Brunswick 



WM. JESSOP &. SONS, Limited, Manufactory, SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



LUBRICATION AND SUPERHEAT 

The greater use of superheated steam is making modern 
lubrication more difficult. You no doubt realize this yourself. In 
the event of trouble, however, we want to suggest to you 

DIXON'S FLAKE GRAPHITE 

which, unlike oil or grease, is entirely unaffected by any degree of 
superheat. 

Engineers from all over the country write and tell us that 
Dixon's Flake Graphite solves their lubrication troublesj'experi- 
enced with superheated steam. 

We would be glad to send you free trial sample by No. 223-C. 



JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO. 



JERSEY CITY. N.J. 



Papet Co. will make extensive improvements 
to its plant here. 

CHATHAM, ONT.— The Western Bridge 
and Equipment Co. will build :: large factor; 
here. 

PORT ARTHUR, ONT.— A new armory will 
be erected here in the spring at a cost of 
$125,000. 

Ottawa. ONT.— Tenders will soon he 
called .hi the new departmental block to be 
located here. The total cost will likely be 

about three and a half millions and big con- 
tractors all over the Dominion are making 
enquiries with a view of tendering. 

VICTORIA, B.C.— L. W. Hargreaves has 
completed the plans for a five-storey hotel to 
lie erected here. The building will be of rein- 
forced concrete, and have elevators and a 
steam heating system. 

SYDNEY, C.B.— K. L. Johnston, of St. John, 
has about completed arrangements for a large 
rolling mill plant here. New York capitalists 
are interested. He took options on two sites, 
and definite anuouneeinent of plans will be 
made later. The new company will construct 
a very large plant, having completed arrange- 
ments with the Dominion Steel Corporation 
for stock. They have secured from the Town 
Council a bonus of $50,000, with nominal 
water and tax. 

REVELSTOKE, B.C.— The Dominion Saw 
Mills and Lumber Co., of Three Valley, and 
Hevelstoke, B.C. have let a contract for the 
erection of a three-storey office building on 
Victoria Ave., here. 

THREE RIVERS, QUE.— The Fres falls 

Co. is pushing the construction of its pulp 
and paper mills at Cap de .Madeline, near 
here. 

PORT HOPE, ONT.— The Standard Ideal 
Co., manufacturers of enameled sanitary ware, 
are spending $100,000 on new construction. 

WALKERVILLE, ONT.— The Canadian 
Bridge Co. is making a $100,000 addition to 
its works. 

MERRITTON, ONT.— An addition of 40 x 
(10 ft. is being made to the works of the Wheel 
Company here. 

PETERBOROUGH, ONT.— The addition the 
Canadian General Electric Co. is making to 
its works at Peterborough will be 125 x 274 
ft. It is to be of brick and steel, and is to 
cost $100,000. 

New Companies. 

MONTREAL, QUE.— The Central Ca a 

Iron & Steel Corporation capitalized at 
M5,000.000 has been incorporated. 

VICTORIA, B.C.— The Western Laundry 
Machinery Co. has been registered. 

MOOSE JAW, SASK.— The Moose Jaw Im- 
plement Co. has been incorporated to deal in 
farm implements. The firm is composed of 
A. H. Gamble, T. J. McCaramon and W. C. 
Yeo, all of this city. 

Trades Notes. 

THREE RIVERS, P.Q.— The contract for 
the pulp machine for the Wayakamite Paper 
Co. has been let to the Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Mon- 
treal. 

The Chapmau Double Ball Bearing Co., 
Toronto, are now manufacturing ball bearings 
for the Tudhope, Reo and Ford Motor Com- 
panies. They have received the orders for 
bearings for the Canadian National Acme 
Mfg. Co. and Crown Laundry, Montreal, and 
new plants of Watson and Smith and Nas- 
mith in Toronto. 

WELLAND, ONT.— The Annual meeting of 
the Robertson Machinery Co. was held Jan. 
13, when the following officers were elected : 
President, D. D. Hooker; vice-president, Blake 
I,. Booth; secretary, J. H. Crow; directors, 
the above officers and Alex. Robertson and 
<;. W. Sutherland. 

TORONTO, ONT.— At the annual meeting of 
the shareholders of the Johnston Harvester 
Company, held at the head offices of the com- 
pany in' Batavia, N.Y., three directors of the 
Massey-Harris Company, viz.: Senator L. 
Melvin Jones, Joseph N. Shenstone and 
Thomas Pindley, were elected as directors. 
\i a subsequent meeting of the directors. 
Senator L. Melvin-.Tones was made president 

.if I •onipany, G. A. Farrall, vice president 

and general manager, L. I). Collins, treasurer 
and assistant general manager, and E. At- 
water, secretary. Mr. Farrall, Mr. Collins and 
Mr. Atwater are residents of Batavia and are 
continuing in the active management of the 
compau v. 

(JAI/r, ONT.— The Stevens Co., manufac- 
turers of machine tools have recently taken 
the agency for the Gronkvist Drill Chucks 
made in ka I rineholm, Sweden. 

Welland Board of Trade. 

At the annual meeting of the Welland 
Board of Trade the following officers were 
elected :— David Ross, pres.; T. D. Cowper, 
vie -pies.; J. D. Payne, secretary; A. H. M. 
I lav manager Bank of Nova Scotia, treasurer; 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



69 



T. .1. Dillon and F. A. Lount, auditors; B. J. 
McCormick, industrial commissioner; council, 
I'. X. McConnell, H. E\ Stoddard, H. L. Halt, 
I.. It. Duff, G. C. Brown ana G. \V. Ilickc.v. 
Canada Cur & Foundry Co. Acquires Ontario 
Iron and Steel Plant. 
Arrangements have been completed for the 
transfer of the Ontario Iron & Stwel plant in 
YVelland to the Canadian Car & Foundry Co.. 
.Montreal, which is a Canadian branch of the 
American Iron & Steel Co. The Ontario Iron 
and Steel Co. are completing a new $20,000 
office building in YVelland and additional im- 
provements will be made. The Page-Hersey 
Works, managed by Mr. Mosley, is not in- 
cluded in the deal. 

Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Coke Ovens. 
Completing touches are being put upon the 
installation of Otto by-product coke ovens at 
the plant of the Dominion Iron & Steel Co.. 
Sydney, N.S., and operations will be in- 
augurated within several months. The new 
plan! consists of 120 ovens of the standard 
Otto type with a holding capacity of 13 tons 
of coal each. The product will be devoted to 
the requirements of the group of blast fur- 
naces of the company. This is the second 
Insallation of Otto ovens by the Dominion 
Iron and Steel Company, a plant of this type 
having been put in service there some years 
ago. Construction work on the present in- 
stallation has been under way for the past 13 
months and the completion of the plant with- 
in this period is regarded as a very satisfac- 
tory achievement considering the weather 
conditions that are confronted there by rea- 
son of the geographical location. The United 
Gas & Coke Co., Whitehall building. New 
York City, which controls the Otto rights, is 
building the plant. 

Taylor & Arnold Open Winnipeg: Office. 
Taylor & Arnold, railway material and sup- 
plies! Montreal, have opened an office in the 
Scott Block. Main Street, Winnipeg, with G. 
C. Walker in charge, to look after all the 
company's western interest. 

Incorporation of Robert W. Hunt & Co. 
Kobert W. Hunt and Co. have been incor- 
porated under the Dominion Companies Act, 
with a capital of $50,000 and office at Mon- 
treal, to carry on the business, in all its 
branches, of civil, mechanical, mining and 
electrical engineers, analysts, metallurgists, 
surveyors, assayers, examiners and inspectors, 
to take over the Canadian business of Robert 
W. Hunt and Co., and also to acquire the 
business and carry out the contracts of the 
Standard Inspection Bureau. 

Canada Motors, Limited. 
Arrangements have been completed for the 
establishment of a new industry in Gait, 
known as Canada Motors. It will have a 
capital of $250,000. The following officers 
have been elected: president. George Dobbie: 
vice-president, A. M. Edwards; secretary, C. 
Tansen; managing director, D. R. Perry; 
treasurer, E. J. Getty. These, with Dr. Mac- 
Kendrick, F. Stewart Scott, Dr. T. F. Camp- 
bell, all of Gait, and A. N. W. Clare, of Pres- 
ton, will form the board of directors. The 
company have engaged temporary quarters 
until permanent buildings are erected. 

Hamilton Facing- Mill Co. Calendar. 
Following their usual custom, the Hamilton 
Facing Mill Co., Hamilton, foundry outfitters 
and manufacturers of foundry facings and 
supplies are mailing to their friends a calen- 
dar for office or home decoration. It con- 
tains a reproduction of the famous painting 
"The Girl in Blue." by Win. Thome. The 
whole painting is a harmony of eloquent 
color for which the paintings of Wm. Thome 
are notable. 

Massey-Harris Co. Busy. 
The Massey-Harris Co., Toronto, who have 
been working overtime for about two months 
have started a night gang and will be in full 
operation night and day. 

New Bridge Co. 
The National Bridge Co.. has been incorpor- 
ated with a capital of $1,000,000 and .$3,000,000 
bond issue. A large plant is being construct- 
ed at Tongue Pointe, near Montreal. The 
Steel work is up and the company will soon 
be operating. The new organization will have 
as its president, ,T. N. Greenshields : as vice- 
president. William Lyall, and the directorate 
will consist of Hon. Robt. Mackay, H. W. 
Beauclerk and B. M. Shepherd. 

Large Steel Plant Near Vancouver. 
Three hundred acres of land on the south 
side of the Fraser River, directly opposite 
Annacis Island, have Just been secured by the 
Canadian-incorporated subsidiary company to 
the Western Steel Corporation as a site for a 
steel plant. The erection of huge blast fur- 
naces and the expenditure of close on $2,000.- 
000 in the construction of buildings and 
wharves and the installation of modern ma- 



chinery is contemplated. In order to provide 
room for a large industrial city tributary to 
the steel works, private capitalists connected 
with the company have taken options on over 
1,500 acres of adjoining property, and much 
id' this is now being purchased outright. The 
location of the site which possesses over 1,700 
feet of waterfrontage along the Fraser River 
with approaches both by land and water, has 
already been approved of by .funics A. Moore. 
president of the Western Steel Corporation, 
now operating a steel plant at Irondale, Wash. 
Among the Vancouver men interested in the 
proposition are II. 1'. McLennan. G. M. Gibbs, 
and S. (J. Faulkner, all directors of the Cana- 
dian subsidiary company. Mr. McLennan con- 
tinued I lie report that the purchase of 300 
acres for a steel plant site bad been approved 
by Mr. Moore. 

Williams & Wilson, Montreal. 
Williams & Wilson. Montreal, are turned 
into a .joint stock company to take over the 
present machinery business of the firm. The 
capital is $200,000, and the Incorporators are 
A. R. Williams. Toronto; F. C. Wilson. YV. A. 
Wilson, M. B. Bronsbetter and E. Kingsland, 
salesman, of Montreal. 

CATALOGUES. 

Calendar.— Mussens, Montreal, are sending 
out a calendar, the figures occupying a space, 
of 10 x 10 inches. They can, therefore, In 
seen from a long distance. Above the figures 
on the sheet for each month, are illustration 
of machinery for which Mussens are sellingffl 
agents, including machine tools, engines, airll 
compressors, railroad and contractors' out- " 
fits, etc. 

Friction Clutches. — The Carlyle Johnson 
Machine Co.. Manchester. Conn., Catalogue 
"E," 1911, 35 pages,. 4 1 /, inches by 7 inches. 
An issue of 25,000. The catalogue is enclosed 
in a handsome cover of two-toned blue, with 
a clutch cut and company monogram em- 
bossed thereon, and is filled with attractive 
illustrations showing the Johnson Clutch, 
factory views, etc. The inside pages have an 
attractive blue border to correspond with tin' 
blue cover, this border being made up of re- 
duced cuts of Johnson Friction Clutches, with 
the headings at the top, of the company name 
and address, as always used in their trade 
paper advertising. This catalogue is larger and 
more complete than previous ones, and deals 
almost exclusively with the driving of machin- 
ery through friction clutches, special atten- 
tion being paid to the driving of machinery 
from line shafting, thus eliminating cross 
belting, countershafting, etc. There is spe- 
cial mention made of clutches for cut-off 
coupling work for use in connection with 
marine motors, as a one-way clutch for which 
work this type of clutch is particularly 
adapted. The lists are very complete, ex- 
tending to clutch parts, which are numbered 
to correspond to the numbers indicating the 
parts on sectional views. Copies will be sent 
free to interested parties. 

Calendar.- The P.. Greening Wire Co. have 
issued a calendar for 1011 containing a bird's- 
eye view of the large plant in Hamilton. Out. 
Half-tones are also given of Nathaniel Green- 
ing, who established the plant in Warrington. 
1700; Benjamin Greening, who established 
the plant in Hamilton. 1S50: S. O. Greening, 
president. 1S77. ami IT. P,. Greening, managing 
director. It is of interest to note that there 
are here represented four generations. 

Machine Tools - Eleventh addition of book- 
let. 2S pages, of lathes, planers, sbapers and 
drills issued by the American Tool Works Co., 
Cincinnati. 

Smooth-on Iron Paint.- -12 page booklet 
from the Smooth-on Mfg. Co.. 572 Communi- 
paw Ave.. Jersey City. N..T. 

Browning Ditchers. — Descriptive catalogue. 
x 12 inches, 32 pages from the Browning 
Engineering Co., Cleveland, describes their 
ditchers, giving dimensions of the devices 
and equipment such as buckets, booms, etc. 
The various operations nre illustrated as well 
as their many uses such as wrecking cranes, 
locomotive cranes, elootro-magnets, etc. 

Gear Testing Machine- Circular S21 from 
Adams Co.. Dubunue. Towa. describing the 
Parwell Gear Testing Machine. 

Boiler Makers* Tools.— J. Pussier Mfg. Co.. 
Moberly. Mo., have issued a neat catalogue 
No. 27. of 32 pages on coated stock, contain- 
ing illustrations and descriptions of roller 
flue expanders, sectional beading expanders, 
flue cutters, patch bolt countersinking tools, 
etc. 

Tapes and Rules. The Lufkin Rule Co.. 
Windsor, have issued catalogue No. 8. con- 
taining 96 pages. (> x inches. It is printed 
on coated paper, neatly bound and contains 
descriptions with illustrations of all styles of 
steel tapes, rules, squares, board sticks, etc. 
All classes of mechanics rules are described. 



ARMSTRONG BROS- 

16 Sheppard St., Toronto 

Mfrs.of SPECIAL MACHINERY 

Patents Perfected 

GEAR CUTTING, TOOLS, DIES, ETC. 

Ruching and Pleating Machinery. 



BOURNET & BLANCHARD 

Machinists and Tool Makers 

ALL KINDS OF WORKS AND REPAIRS 



MANUFACTURERS OK 
MOTORS. DIES AND 



GASOLINE 
PUNCHES 



Opposite the Post Office. LACH1NE, QUE. 



ERNEST SCOTT 

145 BLEURY ST, - MONTREAL 
Machinist and Tool-maker 

Dies for sheet metal work. Stampings and 

light manufacturing. Special machinery 

designed and made to order. 



The PARMENTER BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 
GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, 
Bifurcated and Tubular Rivets, Wire Nails 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, 
Escutcheon Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshoe 
Buckles, Felloe Plates. 



OWEN SOUND IRON WOBKS, LIMITED 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Cement Mill Machinery, Boiler and Steel 

Tank Work of all kinds, Grey 

Iron and Brass Castings 



Boilers 

Horizontal Stationary Tubular 

Locomotive Portable 

Vertical 

Marine 

Wm. Hamilton Co., Ltd. 

PETERBORO, ONT. 







70 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Mechanical 

Drawing 

By Ervin Kcnison, S.B. 

Instructor In Mechanical Drawings Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology 

176 pp.. HO illus. Cloth binding. Gives .1 
course of practical instruction in the art of 
Mechanical Drawing, based on methods 
that have stood the lest of years of experi- 
ence. Includes orthographic, isometric 
and oblique projections, shade lines, inter- 
sections and developments, lettering, etc.. 
with abundant exercises and plates. 
Price. $1 OO 

MacLean Publishing Co. 

Technical Book Department 
143-149 University Ave., Toronto 



8TEELCRETE 



EXPANDED METAL 



REINFORCEMENT for CONCRETE FLOORS 
and ROOFS. 

The most reliable bond for all varieties 
of concrete slab. 



WRITE FOR HAND BOOK AND 8AMPLES 

Competent Engineering staff in charge 
of construction. 

Expanded Metal & Fireproofing Co., Limited 

100 King Street West, TORONTO 



THE 

HOME 

OF 



The John Morrow Screw 



LIMITED 
INGERSOLL 

ONTARIO 





The Jones Improved Stamping 

PRESS GUARD 

This Guard is very simple, yet 
absolutely positive in its action, 
as the operator cannot trip the 
press while his fingers are in 
the danger zone. Also the press 
cannot repeat unless the Guard 
is down in front of dies, and 
then the operator cannot have 
his fingers in at the same time. 
The gate should be set so that 
it is down ou base or die or 
bed of press when the latch of 
press releases. Then when the 
operator releases the treadle the 
gate will rise from 3 to 7 inches, 
according to requirements, leav- 
ing the front open to take out 
and put in work. 

This Guard can be set so fine 
that anything 1-16 inch thick 
under the Guard gate will pre- 
vent the press from operating. 
Thus you can see it is utterly 
impossible for an operator to 
have his fingers between the 
dies and trip the machine at the 
same time. 

Is not in the operator's way 
and does not interfere with the 
output of press; works on all 
kinds of presses, back-geared, 
large or small. 

Note the rigid connection be- 
tween Treadle, Guard and 
Latch. 

These Guards are already in- 
stalled in a number of large 
manufacturing plants and are 
giving every satisfaction. 

We also manufacture guards 
for woodworking machines. 
Write us for circular matter. 

The Jones Safety Device Company 

22 King William St , HAMILTON, ONT. 
Chicago, 111. Buffalo. NY. Brooklyn, N.Y 



Don't 
Stop at 
Merely 
Wishing 

A natural wish of every 
power plant proprietor 
and engineer is for an 
absolutely reliable belt. 

And this wish can be 
quickly realized by the 
purchase of 

"Climax" 

Leather 

Belting 

This is the belt that 
doesn't stretch or slip or 
cling too tight ; the belt 
that will stand hard ser- 
vice with credit to the 
maker and enduring sat- 
isfaction to its user. 

There is very little real 
competition to CLIMAX 
BELTING— it is so good 
as to be in a class by it- 
self — Canada's standard 
line of high grade leather 
belting. 

When, you buy CLI- 
MAX you buy the utmost 
value and reliability in 
leather belting. 

Sadler 6& 
Haworth 

ESTABLISHED 1878 



Montreal, 511 William St. 

Toronto. 27 Melinda St- 

St, John, NB., 89 Prince 'William St. 

Winnipeg. 244 Princess St. 
Vancouver, B.C. 217 Columbia Ave. 



The advertiser would like to know zvhere you saw his advertisement — tell him.- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



71 



Including folding pocket rules, machine di- 
vided rules, etc. 

Chains.— Circular No. 7, from Jones & 
Glassco, Montreal agents for Renold block 
and roller chains. 

Calendar. — For 1911, from American Tool 
Works Co., Cincinnati. At the top of the 
sheet, for each month is a half-tone of oue of 
the various types of machine tools manufac- 
tured by this company. 

Time Recorders. — Sample cards and sheets 
from W. A. Wood, 40 St. George St., Mon- 
treal, manufacturers of "Globe" time record- 
ers. 

Calendar.— The I.C.R. have issued a 1911 
calendar. The emblematic moose head which 
is usually a feature of the I.C.R. literature 
and calendars, appears prominently on the 
cm [endar. 

Cranes. — Catalogue 82 from Whiting Foun- 
iir\ Equipment Co., Harvey, 111., 40 pages. 
The features of Whitney Standard Cranes are 
Shown with a large number of typical in- 
stallations. These include railroad shops, 
machine shops generally, power plants, etc. 
The names of some of the principal customers 
are also given. 

Cranes. — Catalogue No. 25 of 50 pages from 
the Northern Engineering Works, Detroit, 
Mich. Several types of cranes are described 
in. I illustrated. Installations in machine 



shops, foundries, yards, car shops, power 
plants, etc., are given, showing many appli- 
cations of the various types of cranes. 

Book Review. 

A Pocketbook of Mechanical Engineering.— 
By Charles M. Sames, B.Sc. Fourth edition. 
Bound in flexible leather. Size, 4 x 6% in.; 
pages, 220; 42 illustrations. Price, $2. Pub- 
lished by the author, 542 Bramhall Avenue, 
Jersey City, N.J. This book contains a col- 
lection of tables, data, formulas and ex- 
amples, comprising the greater part of the 
reference information usually required by 
mechanical engineers and students, condensed 
into a volume, the dimensions of which are 
small enough to e conveniently carried in the 
pocket. In preparing this last edition, new 
matter has been incorporated to bring the 
work thoroughly up-to-date. Among these 
added subjects are new alloys and alloy steels. 
critical speed of shafts, new steam tables, 
formulas dealing with saturated and super- 
heated steam, steam turbines, electric drive 
and the power required for machine tools and 
cooling towers. Besides these subjects new 
data have been added at a number of points 
in tlie text. The book is a useful one to 
draftsmen and mechanical men generally. 

Shop Kinks. — By Robert Grimshaw. Bound 
in cloth. Size x 7% in. Pages 393; illus- 



trations 224. Published by the Norman W. 
Henley Publishing Co., 132 Nassau Street, 
New York. Price $2.50. This Is the fifth edi- 
tion of a book that shows special ways of 
doing work, as it is done in a number of lead- 
ing shops in America and Europe. The work 
is the outcome of a notebook started by the 
author about 30 years ago and contains items 
written by the author and others for tech- 
nical journals and also material gathered from 
visits to shops or based on data contributed 
by leading machine tool builders and users. 
As far as possible the effort has been made 
to group items of the same nature together, 
and the finding of them is rendered easy by 
an extensive alphabetical index. 

Freight Train Resistance: Its Relation to 
Car Weight.— By Edward C. Schmidt, lias 
just been issued as Bulletin No. 43 of the 
Engineering Experiment Station of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. This bulletin presents the 
results of tests made upon freight trains to 
determine their resistance. The results show 
that the average weight of the cars com- 
posing the trains exerts upon train resist- 
ance an even greater influence than is ex- 
erted by variations in train speed. Copies of 
Bulletin No. 43 may be obtained gratis upon 
application to W. F. M. Goss, Director of 
the Engineering Experiment Station, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Urbaua, Illinois. 




We manufacture all kinds of Pumping 
Machinery, Condensers, Travelling 
Cranes, etc. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 



The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Limited, Hamilton, Canada 



NOKfflERN 
lCRANESl 

All sizes and types — electric or hand 

NORTHERN ENGINEERING WORKS, Detroit, Micb.,U. S. A. 

or, Canadian Dept .ADVANCE MACHINE WORKS, Ltd., Walkerville, Ont. 



These cranes have 
every recent im- 
provement in crane 
practice and many 
exclusive features. 

Bulletin Free. 




Electric Hoists 
Air Hoists 

Overhead Trolley Tracks and 
Trolley Systems 



Bulletin Free 

NORTHERN ENGINEERING WCRKS Detroit. Wlfh.. U. S A. 

or, Canadian Dept.,ADVANCE MACHINE WORKS, Ltd., Walkerville. Ont. 



Short Cuts in Machine Shop Practice 

Hundreds of parts such as axles, bushings, collars, ball and roller bearings, cutting punches, hollow drills, 
piston rods and shafts, lathe spindles and sockets, which formerly had to be bored from solid steel, are 
now made in up-to-date shops and factories by simply cutting Shelby Seamless Steel Tubes to length. 

Shelby Seamless Steel Tubing is made in hundreds of sizes and gauges, in round, square, rectangular, 
hexagonal, octagonal, oval or almost any other section. It can be bent, coiled, flanged, expanded, swaged or 
plated, and it solves most of the hard mechanical problems at once. 

We can make immediate shipments .of 350 sizes from our stocks at Montreal and Toronto. Write for 
stock list, prices and information to 

JOHN MILLEN & SON, LIMITED 

321 ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL 
Sole Canadian Distributors of 

Shelby Seamless Steel Tubing 



72 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



A DOUBLE-SERVICE LATHE 




PRACTICALLY TWO LATHES IN ONE 

Because while it has ample power and strength to turn the full swing of tbegap and the full length of the extension it 
will handle ordinary work as economically as a smaller tool. Hence, while giving to the shop the capacity to do iobs that 
would l.e Impossible on ordinary lathes, the tool ran lie kept profitably employed all the time. In the compactness of its Ben- 
era] design, its range and capacity, as well as in its strictly modern, up-to-date construction, it shows a marked improvement 
over extension gap lathes as commonly built. 

It has carbon steel bead spindle, ground to size bronze spindle bearings carefully scraped and fitted cut-away Hilstoek 
with provision for setting off centerfor taper work, carriage extended for turning full swing of lathe apron of double plate 
type, toiigued and grooved into the carriage, with gears and studs of ample proportions. Every detail has been studied out 



• utmost care, the tool representing as a whole the latest and best in design, material and workmanship. 
LET US SHOW YOU HOW IT WILL INCREASE THE MONEY EARNING POWER OF YOUR PLANT. 



FAY & SCOTT, 



MANUFA'CTURBRS 



Standard Engine, Chucking, Turret, Double Head Pacing and 
DEXTER, MAINE ^««™ Makers' Lathe8, Lathe Turret* for Engine Lathes of 



•J, J»X^f)-^.'- 



How many mill 
owners have warded off 
the thought of buying a 
Locomotive Crane for handling 
of their logs and dimension timbers, 
thinking the equipment a LUXURY? 
Later you would be surprised at the 
great number of these same mill owners 
who, after seeing their smaller com- 
petitor install a "BROWNING," 
have investigated and found the 
outfit a NECESSITY and a 
ncney-saver instead. 

.The Browning Engineering Co. 
^^^^^ CLEVELAND, OHIO ^^ T" 

CMtS 



am^> MILLERS 




No. VA Hand and Power Feed Miller. 



We build Hand and also Hand and Power Feed Machines 

SEND TO-DAY FOR COMPLETE CATALOG 

J^g^^MACHINE COMP'Y 

23 Front St., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



73 



Send for 



FREE SMOOTH-ON BOOK 



This book tells how to make many permanent 
repairs to castings, boilers, engines, tanks, pip- 
ing, etc., using the well-known SMOOTH-ON 
IRON CEMENTS. 

Every Foundryman, Engineer and Machinist 
should have a copy. 



Smooth-On is for 
sale by supply 
houses. 




Smooth- 
ing. Co, 

JERSEY CITY 



N.J. 




■ — ■ — — ■ — 

rj ...111. NIMH I, .11 




/AMMSljIfl..! 




Often Imitated ! Never Equalled ! 

Taliman's Reputation is in the Goods. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Finished Brass Goods 
Brass Castings 
Aluminum Castings 



Mm$x0yM& 




A Double Economy 

Carborundum Grinding Wheels 
are not only the fastest cutting 
but also the longest lasting grind- 
ing wheels on earth. For instance: 

An Indianapolis concern is using 
Carborundum Wheels in grinding 
cast iron piston rings. Each wheel 
turns out 450 to 500 rings an 
hour, removing .010 inches stock. 
And yet, notwithstanding the 
speed at which the wheels cut, 
the micrometer shows that 50 
rings are ground before there is 
any perceptible wheel loss. Result 
^A Double Economy. 

We will be glad to show you what Carborun- 
dum is doing in other lines of grinding — if 
you will write. 

The 

Carborundum Company 

Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

AGENTS: 

Norman Macdonald. 145 Wellington St. West, Toronto. Can. 

McLennan. McFeely & Co.. Vancouver. B.C. 

Williams & Wilson. Montreal. Que. 

A. R. Williams Machinery Co. of Winnipeg, Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



74 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




■ ■ 



PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



CONSULTING ENGINEERS, PATENT ATTOR- 
NEYS. ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS, ETC. 




J. M. ROBERTSON, LIMITED 

CON8ULTINQ ENGINEERS 
Mechanical. Electrical, Hydraulic, Steam, Gas. 

Plant. Specifications, Estimates, 
Teats. Reports and Supervision. 

Suit* 101, Board of Trade Bid*-., Montreal, Que. 



The DUCKWORTH-BOYER 

ENGINEERING AND INSPECTION COMPANY, LIMITED 
Inspecting and Consulting Engineers 

Mill, Shop and Field Inspection of Bridges and Structural Work a Specialty ; Tests of Materials of 
Construction; also Mill Inspection of Rails and Track Supplies; Foundry Inspection of Steel and 
Iron Castings of all Classes ; Boiler and Marine Plates, etc. 

Expert Examinations and Reports. 
OFFICE: 171 ST. JAMES STREET, MONTREAL, P. QUE. 



Russell Machine Co. 

MACHINE TOOL 

AND 

DIE MAKERS 

First-class Workmanship 
Prices Right 

Estimates Furnished to the Trade 

Russell Machine Co. 

St. Catharines, Ont. 



SWIFT MOTOR CAR CO, 

CHATHAM, ONT. 
Contracts Solicited for 
Special Machinery, 

Automobile Parts, 
Tools, Jigs, Fixtures, 
Etc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

THE "SWIFT" 
MARINE ENGINE 



EUGENE C. BROWN 

Engineer and Patent Lawyer 

McGill Bide.. Washington, D.C.. U.S.A. 

Nine Years Examiner U.S. Patent Office, Divs. "f 
dty, Hydraulics and Harvesters. 

Patents Solicited and suits c lucted. 

Investigation of infringement or validity of 

Patents. 

United States offers hesi opportunity for inventions. 



HARRY S. JEFFERY 

"The Boiler Expert." BOO Keeler St..Wishioiilon, D.C. 

I. ate Principal School of Boiler Making, Interna 
tionul Correspondence School 

Boilers, Tanks, Stacks and Stand Pipes de- 
signed : estimates furnished and specifica- 
tions Prepared. 



School of Mining 

A Collerje of Applied Science 

Affiliated to Queen's University 

KINGSTON, ONT. 

Science and Engineering 
Mining 
Civil 

Mechanical 
Electrical 
Power Development 

For calendar write the Secretary 



HANBURY A. 


BUDDEN 


Advocate 


Patent Agent. 


New York Life Building 


MONTREAL. 


Cable Address, BREVET 


MONTREAL. 



ATENTS 



_ PROMPT LY SECUREDl 

We solicit the business of Manufacturers, 
Engineers and others who realize the advisabil- 
ity of having their Patent business transacted 
by Experts. Preliminary advice free. Charges 
moderate. Our Inventor's Adviser sent upon 
request. Marion & Marion, New York l,ife Bldg, 
Montreal ; and Washington, D.C, U.S.A. 



P 



ATENTS 



TRADE MARKS 
AND DESIGNS 
PROCURED IN ALL COUNTRIES 

Special Attention given to Patent Litigation 

Pamphlet sent free on application. 

RIDOUT & MAYBEiE SsrVSTKS 



TORON TO 




FETHERSTONHAUGH & GO. 

PATENT SOLICITORS & EXPERTS 

Fred, B. Fetherstonhaugh, M.E., Barrister" 
at-law and Counsel and expert in Paten' 
Causes. Charles W. Taylor, B.8c, formerly 
Examiner in Can. Patent Office. 

HEAD OFFICE, ROYAL BANK BLDG., 10 XING ST. E.TORONTO 

MONTREAL OFFICE. CANADA LIFE BLDG. 

Offices In Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver and Washington 




Telegraphic Address 
"HALLTYNE" 



WORKS 
Phone Main 256 



THE HALL ENGINEERING WORKS 

14 TO 16 JURORS STREET, MONTREAL 



ENGINEERS, BOILERMAKERS, BRASS & IRON FOUNDERS, 
COPPER SMITHS & BLACKSMITHS, SHIP REPAIRS A SPECIALTY 

Agents for J. & E. Hall's Refrigerating Machinery. 

Atlas Preservative Co. & United Asbestos Co. 

W. H. Allen, Son & Co., Ltd. 

ENGLAND 



THOMAS HALL 



Phone West 17X7 



Late Sapt. Engineer Messrs. Elder 
Dempster & Co. & Can. Pac. Rly. Co., London 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



75 




We also manufacture 

Wire Cloth for all purposes 

Concrete Reinforcement 

Molders' Riddles and Bellows 

Metal Clothes Lockers 

Steel Factory Stools 

Window Guards 

Ornamental Wire and 
Iron^Work 




NO MORE BROKEN WINDOWS. 

The factory or mill lighted by a great number of windows can save a lot of money annually by pre- 
venting these windows from breakage. For this purpose nothing equals in economy, efficiency 
and good appearance 

Greening's Wire Window Guards 

Once bought and put in place these guards will last a lifetime. Accidental breakage is made 
almost impossible. Nothing can fall out of the windows protected by Greening Guards. They 
mean a saving in expense and an improvement in appearance from every point of view. And, on 
account of our enormous output of these and similar goods our prices are the very lowest 
procurable. WRITE US FOR CATALOG. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



LUMENJBEARING COMPANY TORONTO 



High Grade Malleable Castings 

of all sizes and kinds 

Gait Malleable Iron Co., Limited - Gait, Ontario 



We build nine sizes of 
Stokers, capacity from 
25 to 2000 lbs. coal per 
hour. 




t " ^ 

I Our Furnaces Heat Steel with 
the Cheapest Fuel on Earth — 

SOFT, SLACK COAL 

They are all fired with "American" Mechanical Stokers, which burn 
bituminous slack coal automatically and without smoke, and give a 
clear, steady, soft, non-scaling flame. You get increased production, 
at about one-third to one-half the operating cost of oil or hard coal. 
This is a fact- If you burn money to heat steel why not burn less 
of it, and write us at once ? 



(iihp g>tanbarb iEngmwring (ttnmpang Etmitrft 



47 Wellington Street East 



Toronto, Canada 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



:■; 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 







FOR SALE. 



POSITIONS WANTED. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



FOR SALE Belting, pipe nils, pulleys, shsfting, 
hangers, chains, all sizes, new and used, half- 
price. AWo cotton wiste and wipers. Imperial 
Watte and Metal Co., Queen St., Montreal. (Ill 1) 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



*OR SALE -48" x 1 2' Iron Planer. Sellers pat- 
tern. Good condition. Gllson Manufacturing 
Co., Limited, Guelph, Ont. (1) 



FOR SALE— One sin tie hoisting friction en gioe.with 
extra large Toiler on wheels, in per'ect order 1 2 
horsepower. Apply William Welsh, 77 Jurors 
Street, Montreal. (12) 



FOR SALE— 12-inch 4-iaw Chuck, Armstrong Tool 
Holders, Lathe Tools, 2 large iron pulleys, 1 
large wood pulley, nickel plat i nc and polishing 
outfit. Box 23, Tihsonburg, Ont. 



FOR SALE — One Wheelock engine, 100 h.p. and 
boiler. In good order and guaranteed in every 
respect. Can be seen running In Montreal. 
Apply No. 10 St. Peter Street, Montreal. (2) 



MARINE GASOLINE MOTORS of unexcelled 
quality; lump spark type; two to eighteen horse- 
power; pleased to show our motors; send for 
new catalogue. Midland Engine Works Company, 
Midland, Ont. (1-11) 



THE PEMBROKE ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., LTD., 
have the following Maohlnery for sale, which will 
be sold stparately, or as a unit. 

This Plant comprises the complete outfit of their 
steam atatlon, and Is in first class running order. 

2 return boilers— 14' x 68" (tubular) 

1 " -12'x54" 

1 Wheelock Engine— 15" x34", speed 95 R.P.M. 

1 " Tandem Compound Engine— 9"x 24"& 

17" x 24"— speed 95 R.P.M. 

1 Generator. 3 phase, 225 K.W., 60 cycles, 2200 
volts, 450 revolutions. 

1 40 amp. Exciter. 

1 Marble Panel with Instruments. 

1 Jet Condenser. 

1 Duplex Steam Pump. 

50 feet 4" shaft with pulleys, Including 2 friction 
pulleys. 

1 double lesther belt— 50' x 30". 

1 -73' x 22". 

1 " " " — 70' x 18". 

PEMBROKE ELECTRIC LIGHT CO.. LTD. 
Pembrokt, Ontsrlo (tf) 



BELTING. PACKING. ETC. 



BELTING, RUBBER, CANVAS AND LEATHER, 
Hose Peeking, Blacksmith's and Mill Supplies at 
lowest price. N. Smith, 138 York Street, 
Toronto. (2tf) 



RUBBER STAMPS. ETC. 



B CAIRNS, MANUFACTURER OF RUBBER 
. stsmps, stencils, steel stamps, burning brands. 
77-79 Queen Street Esst, Toronto, Ont. (tf) 



MANUFACTURING CENTRES. 



FREE FACTORY SITES- Seven railroads, deep 
water, Niagara power, natural gas, low taxation, 
abundant labor. Wclland, Ontario. B. J. Mc 
Cormlck. (12y) 



WANTED— By young man with both technical and 
practical training, connection with large manu- 
facturing company or large sales firm. Appli- 
cant has had extensive training in correspond ence 
and in advertising, general publicity work and sales 
manager. References exchanged. Address Hustler, 
c/o CANADIAN MACHINERY, Toronto. 



LIVE MAN, thoroughlv practical and theoretical. 
Experienced Improving machine shop methods 
and efficiency. Piece work ; time study ; demon- 
strating. Tactful and diplomatic In handling men. 
Excellent references. Box 108. CANADIAN MACH- 
INERY, Toronto. (2) 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



A BOOK-KEEPING STAFF IN ITSELF — doing 
the work with machine precision and accuracy, 
the National Cash Reg'ster. Write us for demon- 
stration literature. National Cash Register Co., 285 
Yonge St., Toronto. 

ACCURATE COST KEEPING IS EASY if you 
have a Dey Cost Keeper. It automatically re- 
cords actual time spent on each operaiion down 
to the decimal fraction of an hour. Several operations 
of jobs can be recorded on one card. For small firms 
we recommend this as an excellent combination— em- 
ployees' time register and cost keeper. Whether you 
employ a few or hundreds of hands, we can supply you 
with a machine suited to your requirements. Write 
forcatalog. International Time Recording Company 
of Canada, Ltd. Office and factory, 29 Alice Street, 
Toronto. 

COPELAND-CHATTERSON SYSTEMS — Short, 
simple. 'dapted to all classes of business. 
Copeland-Chatterson-Crain, Ltd., Toronto and 
Ottawa. (tf) 

COUNTER CHECK BOOKS — Write us to-day for 
sanp'es. We are manufacturers of the famous 
SURETY NON-SMUT duplicating and triplicat- 
ing Counter Check Books, and Single Carbon Pads 
In all varieties. Dominion Register Co., Ltd., Tor- 
onto. 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE. An Otls-Fensom 
hand-power elevator will double your floor space, 
enable you to use that upper floor either as stock 
room or as extra selling space, at the same time in- 
creasing space on your ground floor. Costs only $70. 
Write for catalogue " B." The Otls-Fensom Elevator 
Co., Traders Bank Building, Toronto. (tf) 

DURING 1910 the MONARCH displaced hun- 
dreds of Typewriters of all makes. In 1911 we 
anticipate a still greater demand. We have cut 
down the allowance on these second-hand machines 
and constquently can sell them cheaper to you. They 
are carefully rebuilt and are guaranteed to give satis- 
faction or your monev back. If you want a good, 
strong, clean working Typewriter at a mere fraction 
of the original cost, write us for catalogue. THE 
MONARCH TYPEWRITER CO., Ltd., 46 Adelaide 
Street West, Toronto, Ont. 

EGRY business systems are devised to suit every 
department of every business. They are labor 
and time savers. Produce results up to the 
requirements of meichants and manufacturers. In- 
quire from our nearest office. Egry Register Co., 
Dayton, Ohio; 123 Bay St., Toronto ; 258^ Portage 
Ave .Winnipeg; 308 Richards St., Vancouver. 

ELLIOTT-FISHER STANDARD WRITING-ADD- 
ING MACHINES make toil easier. Elliot, 
Fisher, Limited, Room 314, Stair Building- 
Toronto. 

FIRE INSURANCE. Insure In the HARTFORD. 
Agencies everywhere in Canada. (tf) 

GET THF. BUSINESS — Increase your sales— Use 
Multigraph typewritten letters. The Multigraph 
does absolutely every form of printing. Saves 
you 25 p.c. to 75 p.c. of your printing bill. Multi- 
graph your office forms, letterheads, circular letters. 
Write us. American Multigraph Sales Co., Ltd., 129 
Bay Street, Toronto. 



IF YOU have been afflicted with one of those foun- 
tain pens that won't write when you want it to, or 
leaks when you don't want it to, give it away to one 
of your poorrelationsand buy a Moore Non-Leakable 
Fountain Pen and you will be happy. Consult your 
stationer. W.J. Gage & Co., Toronto, sole agents 
for Canada. 

INDISPENSABLE in office, store. home-Canadian 
1 Almanac, 191 1 — a National Director,. Complete 
classified information on evrry suoiect of Domin- 
ion Interest. Full Postage, Custums, Banking, Insur- 
ance, Leg.l, Educational, Newspaper, Army, Clerical, 
Gjvern mental. Particulars of leading Institutions and 
societies. Paper Covers, 60c. Cloth, Leather Back, 
75c. All stationers, orsent postpaid on receipt'of 
Price by The Copp-Clark Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

KAY'S FURNITURE CATALOGUE No. 306 con- 
tains 160 pages of fine half-tone engravings 
of newest designs In Carpets, Rugs, Furniture, 
Draperies, Wall Papers and Potteiy with Cash prices. 
Write for a copy— it's free. John Kay Company, Ltd., 
36 King St. West, Toronto. 

MODERN FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION-Our 
system of reinforced concrete work, as success- 
fully used in many of Canada's largest build- 
ings, gives better results at lower cost. "A strong 
statement," you will say. Write us and let us prove 
our claims. That's fair. Leach Concrete Co., Ltd., 
100 King St West, Toronto. (tf) 

MR BUSINESS MAN, are you progressive? It's 
up to you to lest "Consolidated," our new pro- 
cess carbon paper. Because it costs less. Soft 
finish, without smutting, and clear, permanent copies' 
Write for sample sheets and prices. "Consolidated." 
Stratford, Ont. 

PENS— The very best Pens made are those manu- 
factured by William Mitchell Pens, Limited, 
London, England. W. J. Gage & Co., Limited, 
Toronto, are sole agents for Canada. Ask your sta- 
tioner for a 25c. assorted box of Mitchell's Pens and 
find the pen to suit you. 

"QYSTEMS" stand for all that Is best in loose-leaf 
O binders and supplies, letter-heads, statements 
and in fact your office stationery of every des- 
cription. Send us samples of what you are using — we 
will send you prices that will interest you. Business 
Systems, Limited, Manufacturing Stationers, Toronto. 

(tf) 

"THE "Kalamazoo" Loose Leaf Binder is the only 
■*• binder that will hold just as many sheets as you 
sctually require and no more. The back is flex- 
ible, writing surface flat, alignment perfect. No 
exposed metal parts or complicated mechanism. Write 
for booklet. Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Ltd., King and 
Spadlna, Toronto. 

THE METAL REQUIRED in a Modern Concrete 
Building. Our special facilities enable us to 
produce at minimum cost Concrete Reinforce- 
ments, Fenestra Steel Sash, Automatic Fire Shutters 
and Steelcrete Metal Lath. Complete stock, quick 
delivery. Before deeidlng write us for catalogue and 
prices. Expanded Metal and Flreprooflng Co., Ltd.. 
Fraser Ave., Toronto. (tf) 



w 



AREHOU3E AND FACTORY HEATING SYS- 
TEMS. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by the trade throughout Canada, (tf) 



SHOP AGENT WANTED. 



WE want an agent in every machine shop in Canada 
where fifteen or more men are employed, to take 
subscriptions to this Journal. Subscriptions are 
easily obtained and the work can be carried on by giving 
a few minutes to it in the noon hour. Liberal commis- 
sions allowed both for new subscriptions and for renew- 
als. Write for terms. Agents' Dept. CANADIAN 
MACHINERY, 143-149 University Ave.,Toronto. 



When writing advertisers kindly men- 
tion having seen the advertisement in 
this paper. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him.' 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



77 



Accuracy Before Everything 

is the motto of all first class mechanics— the men 
with nice jobs in first class shops. And most of 
them use 

"SLOCOMB" 

Micrometer Calipers 

Simply because they combine with highest 
accuracy, best adjustments, great durability 
and are most handily used. 
Ask your dealer to show you, and note the 
table of decimal equivalents on the thimble, 
consisting of 8ths, 16ths, and 32nds — a 
brand new feature of great value. This handy 
table is in all sizes from 1 in. to 24 in. 

J. T. SLOCOMB CO., 




Canadian Agents 

WOOD, VALLANCE CO. 

Toronto • Hamilton 

AIKENHEAD HARDWARE 
CO. 

Toronto 

FOSS & FULLER 

Montreal 



Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



/UFK/N MACHINE DIVIDED RULES 

£x * ARE STANDARDS OF ACCURACY AND MATERIALS 



Our catalog tells about their many superior features. 
It's sent free on request. 



th e /ufk/n Rule fio. ofQanada. Ltd. 

W/ND30K.ONT. 



British Catalog Register 

The Firms and Companies whose names appear in this "Register" will be pleased to send their Catalogues and Lists, 
promptly, on receipt of request for same. Correspondents are requested in all cases to use business stationery. 


All types of 

LOCOMOTIVES 

built by 

R. & W. Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. 

Engineer* Limited 
NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE. ENGLAND 

Catalogues on application. Established 1817 


MACHINE TOOLS 

of every description and size for 

Engineers, Shipbuilders, Boilermakers, 

&c, &c. 

LATHES A SPECIALTY 

Dempster, Moore & Co., Ltd. 

Robertson St., GLASGOW 


BERTRAMS LIMITED 

Engineers 
Sciennes, EDINBURGH 

PAPER MILL MACHINERY 

and 

MACHINE TOOLS for IRON WORKERS 

Catalogues offered to Purchasers. 


GEO. RICHARDS & CO. Ltd. 

Broadheath near Manchester, 
ENGLAND 
MACHINE TOOLS 
Pulleys, Shafting and Shaft Fittings, Air Com- 
pressors, Sand Blast Apparatus. 


WILLIAM MORGAN & CO., LTD. 

EGLINTON ENGINE WORKS 

Kilwinning, Scotland 

Makers of all kinds of Electric, Steam and 
Hand Cranes. 

Illustrated booklet on application. 


JOHN STIRK & SONS 

Limited 

MACHINE TOOLS 

HALIFAX - - - ENGLAND 


THOMAS A. ASHTON, Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. 

Mill-Gearing Engineers 

High-Grade Goods 

Reasonable Prices 

On Government Lists Established 1 866 


C. W. Burton, Griffiths & Co. 

Ludgate Square, London, E. C England 
and at Manchester and Glasgow. 

Modern Metal Working Machine Tools 
Burton Patent Disc Grinders 

Special Machines fsr the Automobile Industry 


MACHINE TOOLS 

Specialties:— Boring & Turning Mills (Single & 

Duplex Types) Multiple Spindle Drilling, Tapping 

and Boring Machines. 

Automatic Profile Milling Machines 

WEBSTER & BENNETT LTD 

COVENTRY, England 

Cablegrams j "Profile Coventry." 
Agents for Canada— Williams & Wilson, 324 St. James 
St.. Montreal 


FRANK PEARN&CO.,Ltd. 

Manchester, Eng. 

PUMPING MACHINERY 

driven by Steam, Electric Motor, Gas or Oil Engines 


H. W. WARD & CO., Ltd. 

MACHINE TOOL MAKERS 
92 Lionel Street, Birmingham 

Specialities— Capstan and Turret Lathes, Tool- 
makers' Lathes, Milling Machines, Grinding 
Machines, Drilling Machines. 

TelegramB— "Tudor," Birmingham 


WE HOLD THE LARGEST RANGE IN THE WORLD 

All Types and Patterns 


Before purchasing any type of Injector or Elevator 
be sure to send for our latest catalogues and best 
terms. It will save you money to do so. 


THE WHITE INJECTOR CO., Engineer. 

Pendleton - Manchester ■ England 


High-Speed Surfacing and Boring Machin 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in -writing to advertisers. 



TS 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




A LIGHT POWER SQUEEZER FOR 
BENCH WORK 

and a complete line of 

FOUNDRY MOULDING MACHINES FOR ALL KINDS 

OF FOUNDRY WORK 

Standard and Other Types to Suit Conditions 

THE TABOR MANUFACTURING CO. 

18th and HAMILTON STS. PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 




Geo. Anderson & Co., Ltd. 

86 Notre Dame St. West 
MONTREAL 

and CARNOUSTIE, SCOTLAND. 



Photo of 5-ton Motor Travelling Crane, 60-foot span 



Makers all sizes of 

Travelling Cranes 
Electric Derricks 
Steam Derricks 
Locomotive Cranes 

Send for catalogue and Prices. 




Whiting Electric 
Travelers and 

Cranes of all kinds 

Constructed 
for Service 



Scientific Design, First-class Con- 
struction, Improved Brakes, 
Movements under per- 

Four 20-Ton Electric Traveling Cranes, Foundry of Illinois Steel Co.. South Chicago, 111. feet Control. 

COMPLETE EQUIPMENT FOR FOUNDRIES 

Grey Iron, Brass, Car Wheel, Pipe, Malleable and Steel. 

Buildings Designed. Equipment Installed. Complete Plants Delivered to Purchasers Ready to Operate. 

SSI, WHITING FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT CO. =T 

HARVEY, ILLS. (Chicago Suburb) 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



79 



THE SCOTIA ENGINEERING WORKS 

11-1315 BUSBY IANE. MONTREAL 

Engine and Boiler Makers 

Brass and Iron Founders 

ppersmiths . : . Blacksmith 

Marine Work a Specialty 

All kinds of Presses and 
Machine Repairs 

T.O.SINCLAIR - PROPRIETOR 

Formerly Partner Hall Engineering Works 





UNITED FIRE BRICK Company 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 

HIGH GRADE FIRE BRICK, SILICA BRICK, 
SPECIAL SHAPES, AHD DUST. 

Special Brands for Foundry, Rolling Mill and Steel Plants. Cement 
and Lime Kilns, Glass Plants, Bee-Hive and Bi Product Coke Ovens. 
Boiler Settings, Forge (oil or gas) Furnaces, etc 



MAIN OFFICE: 

First National Bank Building, 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 



BRANCH SALES OFFICE: 
1601 Arrott Building, 
PITTSBURG, PA. 



Canadian Sales Agent : W.F.MARSHALL, 97 King St. West, Toronto 
Long Distance Telephone Main 6054 Toronto 



Detroit Solvay Coke 

AVERAGE ANALYSIS 

91% Carbon, 8% Ash and 65/100% Sulphur. 

The analysis of contents of every car is shown on every invoice. 

Insures Increased Melt 

and Extra Fine Castings. 

BAIRD <& WEST 

DETROIT 

Sole Selling Agents Detroit Ovens. 





Offices and Warehouse, cor. Larned 
and Third Streets, Detroit 



FREDERIC B. STEVENS 

Manufacturer 

Foundry Facings 

Foundry Supplies 

Buffing Compositions 

and 

Platers' Supplies 



TORONTO WAREHOUSE : 137 Jarvis Street 

Mr. J. M. Mayers, Resident Manager 



Telephone No. Main 6355 



This means direct representation, large warehouse stock an d good service 






Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



SO 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



FIRE BRICK 

AMERICAN and SCOTCH 



eV.KSTEE£. 




r RAMSAY 



CUPOLA BLOCKS and all 
other SPECIAL SHAPES 

For Foundries, Blast Furnaces, Rolling 
Mills, Steel Plants, Cement and Lime 
Kilns, Glass Plants, Boiler Settings, etc. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS 
from our stock in Toronto, or direct from Works. 

The Ontario Lime Association 

LIMI TED 
118 Esplanade East, - TORONTO 



OF* 



IMS 



"Emergency" Cupola 



is a most excellent little 
melter, and has been exten- 
sively adopted both at home 
and abroad, including' several 
Government departments. 



Full 
Particulars 

on 
Application 




We are also 
makers of 

The Rapid 

"Economic" 

Cupola 

and complete 

Foundry 

Melting 
Equipments. 

FEED-WATER 

HEATERS, 

FILTERS, Ac. 

GEORGE GREEN & CO. 

FOUNDRY ENGINEERS 

KEIGHLEY, - ENGLAND 

Cable Address: "CUPOLA," Keighiey. 






A GOLD MINE 

may be at your disposal on your very 
premises. Look out of your side win- 
dow or back door and see if you have 
not an accumulation of cupola dump, 
and other foundry refuse, which is a 
total loss to you in its present state. 
Why not add to your profits and install 
one of the Sly Patent Cinder Mills to 
reclaim this iron and be astonished at 
your former loss and pocket the rich re- 
turns from your newly-discovered mine. 

Sly's Patent Iron Cinder Mill will 

save 95% of the coke contained in your 

cupola dump, and gangway scrapings. 

Iron is valuable, then why throw it in 

the dump? Iron recovered by this Mill 

is better than machinery scrap. Study 

economy in a foundry and your profits will increase accordingly. Mill will pay for itself three 

or four times every year, and we have records of Mill paying for itself twelve times a year. Let 

ua know amount of your daily melt and we will quote. Write for Cinder Mill Catalogue F. 

We also manufacture Cleaning Mills, Dust Arresters, Sand Blast and Foundry Equipment. 

THE W. W. SLY MFG. CO., CLEVELAND, O. 




I 

R 
O 

N 



SLY'S PATENT IRON CINDER MILL 
Patented, No. 514097. Patented, No. 841728. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



81 




The use of a 
good core sand 
binder will 
lower several 
of your cost items. 

Glutrin is the best 
core sand binder. 



GLUTRIN 



Robeson Process Company 

Grand Mere, P.Q. 

Selling Agent* : 

FRANCIS HYDE & COMPANY 

31 Wellington Street 
MONTREAL, CANADA 



r 



Interesting News 




to 



Foundrymen 



and 



Machinists 

Cyclone 
Hoists 

High Speed 



EFFIC'ENCY = 80%.— The hoists will raise two tons one 
foot, with 125 pounds pull, overhauling only 39Ys feet 
hand chain. AUTOMATIC BRAKE immediately locks 
when hand chain is released. 

FOR OTHER POINTS ASK 
US FOR OUR CATALOG 

Have you tried our ACME PARTING in your foundry? 
Ask for samples. 

Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Go., Limited 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 
Foundry Supply Dept. 



CALGARY 







&".""j,»»i.;>m 




JONATHAN BARTLEY CRUCIBLE CO. 



TRENTON, N. J., U.S.A. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 



Crucibles of Quality 

Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 






Canadian Machinery 



Grimes Roll-Over 
Molding Machine 




This is a simple, standard 
machine, requiring small 
floor space. 

It is perfectly balanced, 
requiring no counter-bal- 
ancing mechanism, as 
centre of gravity is centre 
of rotation. 







' 




~ll 


1 


— vm 




W^m^^\^m 







No. 1 



No. 2 



By means of small hand wheel shown in cut, one man can turn largest flask 
smoothly and without jerk. 

Pattern is drawn by absolutely straight gravity drop. 

This machine is adjustable for deep flasks and can readily take care of flask 
24 in. x 36 in. and 4 to 12 in. in depth, with maximum pattern draft of 12 in. 

Positive adjustable pins at four corners of clamping device, Fig 2, compensate 
for unevenness of floor boards. 

PRICE, f.o.b. cars Windsor, $125.00 

HIGH GRADE CASTINGS are not made with low grade materials. 
Think this over when you see a poorly finished casting in your cleaning 
room, and remember, if you please, if you wisb to place the pattern in the 
high grade class, our No. 48 Plumbago will do it, also that the saving in 
cleaning room expense would pay for three times the necessary No. 48 
Plumbago to have made it high grade. 

Another vital point is that you have a core wash which will peel clean and 
not run before the metal. Try our Eureka Blacking, the best core wash on 
the market. 

The Detroit Foundry Supply Company 



PLATERS' AND 
POLISHERS' 
SUPPLIES 



F 



ACING 
IRE BRICK 
OUNDRY SUPPLIES 
OUNDRY EQUIPMENT 



DETROIT, MICH. 
WINDSOR, ONT. 



We are exclusive selling agents for Homogen 

If you wish a light colored parting equal to Lycopodium, Try our Eureka Parting. 



The advertiser rvould like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



83 



II 



THE SELECTION OF 

FIRE BRICKS 



Fire Bricks are a necessary item of expense and, as such, 
should be given careful consideration This expense is only kept 
on a minimum basis by using the most suitable fire brick to meet 
the exact conditions of service. 



Sole 

manufacturers 

of 

KING 

Fuel Oil 

Furnaces 

for all 

heating 

and melting 

purposes 



The purchase price of Fire Bricks does not indicate their cost. 

It is the life of the Fire Brick which demonstrates whether 
you are getting full value for the money invested. 

In addition to being required to withstand heat, Fire Bricks 
are frequently subjected to one or more of the following conditions- 

1st. Chemical action of powerful fluxes and slags. 

2nd. Reducing action of gases. 

3rd. Sudden heating and cooling with wide temperature 
variations. 

4th. Pressure and grinding action. 

5th. Abrasion. 

6th. Cutting and impinging flame. 

7th. Combination of one or more of the above with heat. 

No matter what your needs are, we have a brick which will 
give you satisfaction. 

Our technical department is ready at all times to offer sugges- 
tions which will eliminate your fire brick troubles. 

Protect yourself against tedious delays and costly experiments 
by buying your fire bricks from us — who know this business 
from A to Z. 

The best known brands on the market to-day are our WOOD- 
LAND. H.W. SPECIAL, MUNRO. BONNYBRIDGE, KIRKWOOD. 



FRANCIS HYDE & COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Foundry Equipment and Supplies 

31 Wellington Street - MONTREAL, QUE. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



"MORSE" 



M.T.O.&M.CO. 



V 




Twist Drills 

\a/ i 1 1 do your work as you want it: done. 
MORSE TWIST DRILL & MACHINE CO., New Bedford, Mass., U.S.A. 

Our goods are handled by —Rice Lewis & Son, Ltd., Toronto: Aikenhead Hardware Co., Ltd., Toronto; Frothingham & 

Workman, Montreal; Mechanics Supply Co., Quebec. 



Three Minutes' Grinding puts 
a new and stronger tang on 
the shank. It fits the 
lower slot in the 
socket. 




^What Do 



Your Twisted-OK Tangs Cost ? 

Keep account for a time of the new drills used to replace 

those thrown into the scrap heap because of twisted-off tangs, and 

you will see. These scrapped drills are all right in every other respect. 



^ The "PERFECT" Double-Tang Socket 4- 



gives a simple, effective, and inexpensive means of eliminating this cost and put- 



ting the drills back in money-earning shape. Write for Folder A. 

The ^^^^ Twist Drill Co. <*££ 



CLEVELAND 

New York 



BUTTERFIELD'S 

Taps, Dies and Reamers 



have found favour with 
the best mechanics in 
every part of the Dom- 
inion because they are 
accurate tools, thor- 
oughly tested, reliable 
and made to wear. 

The special harden- 
ing and tempering is 
responsible in a large 
measure, for the ex- 
cellence of these tools, 
in the manufacture of 
which only the first 
quality materials and 
highest skilled labour 
are employed. 

Write us to-day for 
details and prices. 

Butterfield and Co,, 

Rock Island, Derby Line, 
QUEBEC. VERMONT. 



V ■ " 

nuts 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 



High Speed Steel 

AND 

High Speed Tools 



CONQUEROR IMPROVED 



HIGH- 
SPEED 



made by twisting the rolled bar. 
NO EXPENSIVE MILLING. NO 
WASTE of COSTLY MATERIAL 
The natural fibre of the Steel 
remains undisturbed. 







RESULT- 

BETTER DRILLS, 
LESS BREAK- 
AGES, LOWER 
PRICES 



A feature of 

these Drills is 

that no special 

holder is required. 

Shanks made to fit 

ordinary Morse Sockets 

MAKERS 

Beardshaw & Son, Ltd. 

Sheffield, Eng. 

General Sale* Af ent : 

ALEXANDER GIBB, Montreal 

Seles ArfiDts for New Brunswick: 

T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B. 
G. B. OLAND & CO., Halifax, N.S. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



85 



CANADIAN MACHINERY BUYERS' DIRECTORY 

To Our Readers — Use this directory when seeking to buy any machinery or power equipment. 

You will often get information that will save you money. 
To Our Advertisers — Send in your name for insertion under the heading of the lines you make or sell. 
To Non-Advertisers— A nominal rate of $1 per line a year is charged non-advertisers. 



Abrasive Materials. 

Rupert G Bruce Co , Ltd , Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd.. Hamiltou. 
Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co., Toronto 
Steve s, F. B Detroit, Mich. 

Air Propellers. 

Matthews & Yates, Manchester, Eng. 

Air Receivers. 

Canadian Rand Co., Mcntreai. 
HoldenCo. Montreal 

Aluminum. 

Parke & Leith, Toronto 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

Arbors. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Mora" Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Arbor Presses. 

Niles-Benient-Pond Co., New York. 

Automatic Chucks. 

Garvin Machine Co , New York 

Automatic Index Milling 
Machines. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Automatic Machinery. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Gardner, Robt. & Son, Montreal 
MiiBsen" T im-ted, Montreal. 

Axle Cutters. 

Butterfleld & Co., Rock Island, Que. 
A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Babbit Metal. 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Lumen Bearing Co.. Toronto. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 



Ball Bearings 



Chapman Double Ball Bearing Company, 
Toronto 

Balls, Steel. 

Hermann Boker & Co., Montreal 
John MiUen & Son, Montreal 

Barrels, Steel Shop. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland. 

Bars, Boring. 

Hall Engineering Works, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Oo., New York. 

Bassite, 

Bassite Smelting Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Belting, Chain. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Jones & G'asseo, Montreal 

John MiUen & Son, Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Belting, Cotton. 

Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton. 

Belting, Leather. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co. , Montreal. 
J. L. Goodhue & Co., Danville, P.Q. 
Imperial Waste & Metal Co., Montreal 
McLaren, J. 0., Montreal. 
Sadler & Haworth. Montreal 

Belting, New and Used. 

Imperial Waste and Metal Co., Montreal 

Bending Machinery. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundaa, Ont. 
Bertrams Limited, Edinburgh, Scotland 
Bliss, E. W., Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Jardine, A B. ft Co.. Hesp'ler. Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin. Ohio. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Boilers. 

Canadian General ft Shoe Machinery 

Co., Levis, Que. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Goldie ft McCulloch Co., Gait. 
The John Inglis Co.. Ltd., Toronto 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 



Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Robb Engineering Co , Amherst, N. 
Scotia Eng. Company, Montreal 
Siandard Engineering, Co., Toronto. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Boiler Compounds. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hail Engineering Works, Montreal. 

Boiler Feed Regulators. 

Standard Fngineering Co., Toronto. 

Boiler Makers' Supplies. 

Jno. F. Allen Co., New York 

Boiler Mountings. 

Standard Engineering Co., Toronto. 

Boiler Settings. 

Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 

Bolt and Nut Machinery. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Gard"er Robt. & Son, Mo treal 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin. Ohio. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co. New York. 
Waterbury Farrell Foundry & Machine 
Co., Waterbury, Conn. 

Bolt Cutters. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 
Mussens Limited, Mcntreai. 

Bolt Cutter Die Sharpener. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Bolt Headers. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Bolt Pointers. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin Ohio 

Boring Machines, Upright. 

John Bertram & Sons Co.. Dundas, Ont. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co. , Hamilton 

Holden Co., Montreal 

Kellogg * Co.. Toronto 

London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 

Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Boring Machines, Wood. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 

Chicago, HI. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Boring and Turning Mills. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Billiard Machine Tool Co., Bridgeport, 

Conn 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
MusRens I imited, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Box Puller. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Boxes, Steel Shop. 

Cleveland Wire Soring Co., Cleveland. 
Francis Hyde & Co., Montreal. 

Boxes, Tote. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland 
Francis Hyde & Co., Montreal. 

Brake Shoes 

Holden Co., Montreal 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Brass Working Machinery. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Gardner. Robt., ft "on Montreal 
Mussens Limited Montreal. 
Warner & Swasey Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Brazing Compounds. 

Phillips-Laffitte Co., Philadelphia 

Buckets, Clam Shell. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, O. 
Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Company, 
Harvey, 111. 



Buckets, Grab. 



Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, O. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Mom real 

Bulldozers. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Burners, Fuel Oil. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Fra cis Hyde * Co. Montreal. 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 
Whitinz Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey. 111. 

Burners, Natural Gas. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hvde * Co.. Montr-al. 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 

Burrs, Iron and Copper. 

Parmenter & Bul'ock Oo , Gananoque 

Calipers. 

Schuchardt & Schutte, New York 

Canners' Machinery. 

Bliss. F. W . Co., Brooklyn. N.Y 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 



Car Replacers 



Holden Co., Montreal 
Mont'e^l Steel Works, Montreal 

Car Wheels, Mine 

Montreal Rtee 1 Works, Montreal 

Cars, Factory & Warehouse 

Rupert O Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Fr»n"is Hvde * Co . Montreal. 
Sbeld-ns Linrr'ed. Oa't 
Whitine Foundry Equirnient Co., Har- 
vey, III. 

Cars. Industrial. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Francis Hvde ft Co.. Montreal. 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Castings, Aluminum. 

Lumen Bearing Co. . Toronto 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 



Castings, Brass. 



Hall Engineering Works, Montreal. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Toronto 

Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 
Waterous Engine Works Co. Brantford 

Castings, Grey Iron. 

Oar'n'r, Roht. ft Son. Montreal 
Hall Engineering Works, Montreal. 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
J»s. Smjrt Mf». Co , Brnckville Ont. 
Waterous Engine Works Co , Brautfor 

Castings, Manganese Steel 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Castings, Malleable. 

Gait Malleable Iron Co., Gait 
Pratt & Letchworth, Brantford 
Smiths Falls Malleable Castings Co.. 
Smiths Falls 

Castings, Phosphor Bronze. 

Lumen Bearing Co., Toronto 

Castings, Semi-Steel. 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Cement. 

Shelton Metallic Filler Co., Der >y. Conn 

Cement Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Gardner. Robt. & Son. Montreal 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 



Centre Punches. 

The Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo 

Centreing Machines. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundaa. Ont 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Gardner Rol.t. ft S >n, Montreal 
Jeffrey Mfg Co., Mon real 
London Mach Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Centrifugal Pumps. 

The John Inglis Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Pratt « Whin ey Co . Har' ford, Conn. 
Waterous Engine Works Co , Brantfo. d. 

Chain Blocks. 

Rupert G. Pruce <~o., Ltd , Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
John MiUen & Son, Montreal 
M"8 ens Limit, d. Montreal 
Schuchaidt & Schutte, New York 

Chucks, Drill and Lathe. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Cleveland Twist Drill i o., Cleveland 
Cushman ' huck Co., Hartf rd, oun 
Gardner Robt. & Sen. Montreal 
S. E. Horton Machine Co., Windsor 

Locks, Conn. 
Jacobs Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 
Ker & Goodwin, Brantford. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford 
Mussen" I imi ed, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Ru sell Anti-' riction Drill Chuck Co 

• Elmira, N Y 
Schuchardt & Schutte, New York 

Chucks (Planer or Milling.) 

Gardner, Robt. & Son, Montreal 

Chucking Machines. 

The Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Warner & Swasey Co., Cleveland, Ohio 

Chucks, Universal. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Circuit Breakers. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 

Cloth and Wool Dryers. 

B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Sheldons Limited, Gait 

Clutches. 

Berg Machinery Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Toronto 

Coal Boring Machines. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 
Cumming, J. W., New Glasgow, N.S. 

Coal Cutters. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 

Coal Handling Machinery. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, O. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co , Montreal 
Standard Engineering Co. , Toronto. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 

Coal Miners' Tools. 

Cumming, J. W., New Glasgow, N. S. 

Collectors, Pneumatic. 

Sheldons Limited, Gait 

Combination Pliers. 

Reed Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa, 

Compressors, Air. 

Canadian Rand Co,, Montreal. 
Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Da'ling Bros., Ltd.. Montreal 
Hall Engineering Works, Montreal, Que. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
The Smart-TurnerMachineCo., Hamilton 

Concentrating Plant. 

Gardner, Robt & Son, Montreal 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Concrete Mixers. 

The Canadian FmrbanW Oo . Montreal 

i Hamilton 
J»tTr»y M'g Oo . Montreal 

Condensers. 

Gold* * MeOuUooh Oo . 0«lt. 
Hall K"»lneerirg W."k« Montreal. 

The.' 

Hanoi' on 

Wall W Engine Oo . Bramford. 

Consulting Engineers. 

Bain ft Mitchell. Montreal 

Hall Engineering Worre. Montreal. 

Robertson J M . ltd Montreal 

Star. " lU ' 

Controllers and Starters 
Electric Motor. 



'anaJlai. Weslinghouse Co . Hamilton 
4 I! V.:. ;ru DO Hamilton 



¥ 

Conveyor Machinery. 

Th* Canadian JaiitankaOo.. MontrejJ 
Hamilton 

t;o; ' i:a " 

Jrtlr.> Y. . real 

Mii» rti I. niit-.t. Mo treal 

Hamilton 
Watsrous Engine Works Co . Brantford. 

Coping Machines. 

John Bertram * Sons Oo . Dnnd 

rd ' i Hamilton 
h Tool Co . Hamilton. 
ffles-BementPomi Co . New \ ork. 

Corundum and Corundum 
Wheels. 

madias HairhantaCo Montreal 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd. Hamilton 

Counterhores. 

Clev land Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Countersinks. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 

Couplings. 

Gardner Robt. ft 8on. Montreal 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 
Sound 



Couplings, Air. 



Canadian Rand Co , Montreal. 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 
Chi., ago 

Cranes, Locomotive. 

Br ow nin g Engineering Co., Cleveland, O 

Cranes, Traveling, Electric 
and Hand Power. 

Advance Ma- hine Works Walkerville, 

ario 
Northern Eng Works, Detroit 1 B-o 

Cranes, Wrecking. 

Browning Enginee land 

Crank Pin Turning Machine. 

London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
nt-Fond Co.. New York. 

Crankshafts. 

l.i.l . Welland 

Crossings, Diamond Bail 

rl i, Montreal 

Crushers, Rock or Ore. 

Jeffr> > MIj i i . Montreal 

Waterooa Engin Works Co. Krantford. 

Cut-off Coupling Clutches. 

arlyle Johnson Machine ( 

I 

Cutters, Flue. 

Independent Pnenmatii Tool Co., 
Cbloai 



Cutters, Pipe. 



A ii Jardine 4 On . net eler, Onl 

•lass. 

Cutter Grinder Attachment 

mad Milling Mn 

unnati 

Cutter Grinders. 

ati Million Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati 
<;ar>in Ma/ 

H ra i l'a. 

Cutters, Milling. 

The I 

Cleveland Twim Drill Co., l'veland 
Garvin Machine Co . New Y'i k 
I'wie Drill ami Machine ' 
Bedford 
Muasena Limi'ed, Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co . Hartford, Conn 



Cutting-off Machines. 

A-lll.«tron k - I < . Chicago 

John Bertram ft Sons Oo Hondas, Ont 
Garvin M i I ln« Co . Ni « York 
London Maoh Tool Oo . Hamilton. 

- i Imiti il Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whit n<) Co , Hartford, Conn. 

Cutting-off Tools. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 

Ki.lian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
London Maob Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Pratt ft Whitney, Hartford. Conn. 
Barrett to., Athol, Mass. 

Damper Regulators. 

ladian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Standard Engineering Co . Toronto. 

Dies. 

Armstrong Bros., Toronto 

Banflel.l, W H. ft Son, To onto 

Bliss, E. W . Co , Brooklyn, NY. 

Gardner, Hobt ft ^on, Montreal 

Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co , New 

Bedford 
Reed Mfe Co.. Erie. Pa. 
Kuan ll Machine to. St. Catharines, Onl 

Die Castings. 

Talbnan Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 

Die Linkers. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Die Manufacturers. 

Ernest Scott. Montreal 

Die Stocks. 

Curtis ft Curtis Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Jardine, A. Ii . ft Co , Hespeler, Out. 

Dies, Self-opening. 

Geometric fool Co., New Haven, Conn. 



Drills, Bench. 



Dies, Opening. 



W. H. Banfleld ft Sons, Toronto 
Jardine. A. B. ft Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford Conn. 

Dies, Threading. 

Jardine, A. B., ft Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Draft, Mechanical. 

W. H. Baiitield ft Sons, Toronto. 
Buttertleld ft Oo . Rock iBland, Que. 
A B. .lirdine ft Co Hespeler 
Pran ft vVhitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 
Sheldon s Limited, Gait. 

Dredging Machinery. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 

Drill Presses. 

Garrin Machine Co.. New York 

Drilling Machinery. 

Garvin Machine Co.. New York 

Drilling Machines, all kinds. 

Canadian Veatea Gordon Co , Hamilton 

Drilling Machines, Horizon- 
tal 

John Bertram & Sons Co.,Dundas,On 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Mu sens Limited Mo treal 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drilling Machines, 
Locomotive. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
A. B. Jardine ft Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Mussens Limited. M 'ii.real. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drilling Machines, 

Multiple Spindle. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co. , Hamilton, Ont 
Musae -a Limited. Montreal, 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drilling Machines, Radial. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
London Mach. Too] Co , Hamilton. 
Mussm,. Limit,, i M<oi!r'-al. 
NUea-Bemenl PondOb., New York. 

Drilling Machines, Sensitive. 

II (. Barr, Won 

Drilling Machines, Turret. 

John Bertram ft Sons Oo Dnndas Ont 

llalilllloli 

Nile 1 * Bemenl Pond Oo., New York. 

Drilling Machines, Upright. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
A. B Jard.neftCo , Heap ler, Ont 
■I Co . Hamilton, 
Miissf-ns Limited, Montreal. 
It McDongall I o . calt 

Drilling Posts. 

The K' 1 I . Buffalo 



London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co . Hartford. Conn 
United State* Electrical Tool Oo., Oln 
olnnati 



DrUls, Bit Stock. 



Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Dril and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 



Drills, Blacksmith. 



Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleieland 
A. B. Jardine ft Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Drills, Centre. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 
L. S. St arret t Co., Athol, Mass. 

Drills, Coal and Plaster. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 
dimming, J. W., New Glasgow, N.S. 



Drills, Electric. 



Holden Co., Montreal 
Mussens Limit«,i, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., Mew York. 
United States Electrical Tool Co., Cin- 
cinnati 

Drills, High Speed. 

Win. Abbott, Montreal 

Hermann Bok' r& Co., Montreal 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co , Cleveland 

Alexander Gibb Montreal. 

Mo-se Tw'sf Drill and Machine Co.. N> w 

Bedford 
Mussens ' im'ted. Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Drills, Hand. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Drills, Multiple Spindle 

Garvin Machine Co. New Y r ork 



Drills, Oil Tuhe. 



Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Mors- Twin Drill andMachine Co., New 
Bedford 

Drills, Pneumatic. 

John F. Allen Co., New York 
O nadian Ra>d Co . Montreal 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago, New York 
Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Drills, Portable Electric. 

Holden Co., Montreal 
United States Electricul Tool Co., Cin- 
cinnati. 



Drills, Ratchet. 



Armstrong Bros. Tool Oo , Chicago. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co Cleveland 
A. B. Jardine ft Co., Hespeb r 
The Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Morse Twist Dril and Machine Co., New 

Be iford 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Drills, Rock. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
JeffreyMfg Co., Montreal. 

Drills, Sensitive. 

Mussens Limited, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York 



Drills. Track. 



Clev land Tw stDri'lOo , CI veland 
Morse Twiot Drill and Machine Co., New 



Drills, Twist. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Hermann B oker ft Co., Mori' real 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Alex. Gibb. Montreal. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co. 

New Bedford, Mass. 
M sseus Limited. Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford.Conn. 

Drill Sockets. 

Morse Twist Drill aud Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Dry Kiln Cars. 

Sheldons Limited, Gait 

Dry Kiln Equipment. 

Sheldons Limited, Gait 



Dump Cars. 

Rupert O. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co. , Hamilton 
Francis lydeftCo Montreal. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co . Mon ri^al 
NilesHeiuent I'ond Co.. New York. 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Dynamos. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Canadian WeBtinghouse Co., Hamilton. 
Hall Engineering Work", Montreal, Que 
Lancashire Dynamo and Motor Co., Ltd., 

Toronto 
T. ft H. Electric Co., Hamilton 

Electrical Supplies. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian WestlnghouseCo.. Hamilton. 
T ft H. ElectricCo, Hamilton. 

Elevators. 

Francis Hyde ft Co.. Montreal. 
Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 
Watercus Engine Wo>ks Co.. Brantford. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co.. Har- 
vey, 111. 

Elevator Buckets. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Mon'real 

Waterous Engine Works Co , F"rantf< rd. 

Emery and Emery Wheels. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd , Hamilton. 
Garvin Machine Co., New\ r ork 
Franci- Hyd- ft Co , Montreal 
Stevens, F. B., Detroit Mich. 



Emery Stands. 



Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Fran, is Hy e ft Co,, Montreal. 

Emery Wheel Dressers. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton. 
Gardner. Robt ft Son Montreal 
Francis Hyde ft Co , Montreal. 

Engineers, Marine and Mech- 
anical. 

Canadian General & Sbue Ma hinery 
Oo. Levis, Que. 

Engines, Marine. 

John InglisCo , Ltd., Toronto 
The "Swift" Motor Car Co. of Canada 
Ltd , Chatham 

Engineers' Supplies. 

Hall Engineering Works, Montreal. 

Engines, Gas and Gasolene. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., I lam il on 
Fielding ft PUtt Ltd., Glou ei-ter, Eng. 
Goldie ft McCulloch Co., Gait, Ont. 
Jones ft OasBco Montreal 
The "Swift" Motor Car Co. of Canada. 
Ltd., Chatham 

Engines, Steam. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co.. Hamilton 

The Goldie ft McCulloch Co.. Gait, Ont. 

Robb Engineering Co., Amherst N.S. 

Scoia Eng. Co., Montreal 

Sheldons limited, Gall. 

The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Equipment, Shop. 

Garvin Machine Co , New York 

Escutcheon Plus. 

Parmeuter ft Bulloch Oo Gananoque 

Excavating Machinery. 

JeffreyMfg Co.. Montreal 

Exhaust Heads. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros , Ltd. Montreal. 
SheldonB Limited, Gait. Ont. 
Standard Engineering Co , Toronto. 

Fans, Electric. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamiltou 
Matthews ft Yates, Manchester Eng. 
Sheldons Limited Gait. Ont. 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 

Feed Water Heaters. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darlinu Bros., Montreal 
George Green ft Co., Keighley, Eng. 
Mohb Enginee intr o., Amh rrt. N.S 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 
Standard E gineering 1.0., Toronto. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford. 

Files. 

Nicholson File Co., Port Hope, Out. 
Simonds Mfg. Co., Fitchburg. Mass. 



Flanges. 



Dart Union Co., Ltd., Toronto 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



87 



Power Talk No. 3— 



That New Power Plant 

Will be installed with an eye to getting the best results 
from every ton of coal. 

Your power transmission equipment should be bought 
with the same care. 

The difference between the cost of power at your engine 
or motor and at your machine averages from 20% to 70%. 

This is wasted in friction. 

Chapman Double Ball Bearings are guaranteed to save 
75% of this shaft friction and 95% of lubrication over any 
type of self oiling bearings. 

They are now installed in over 1,000 Canadian factories. 
Send us a rough sketch of your shafting layout and we 
will advise you as to the amount of power that can be 
saved and the cost of installing Ball Bearings. 

The Chapman Double Ball Bearing Co. of Canada, Limited 

347 SORAUREN AVENUE, TORONTO, CANADA 




COVENTRY "NOISELESS" CHAINS 

are in very many cases preferable to any other form of power transmission. Positive speed ratio — low jour- 
nal pressure— high efficiency— silence— and the ability to run satisfactorily in damp or heated atmosphere, 
are rapidly bringing "COVENTRY" Noiseless Chain Drives into favor in factories and machine shops, on 
automobiles, motor trucks and aeroplanes— in fact almost everywhere that power is transmit lid 

We will be glad to give you full information and suggestions for applying "COVENTRY" Noiseless 
Chain Drives to your power transmission problems Write us for the "COVENTRY" Catalogue. 

JOHN MILLEN Ql SON, LIMITED 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

Address all correspondence to 321 St. James Street. MONTREAL 










MODERN 

Bolt, Nut and Forging Machinery fc[S^ 
and National Wire Nail Machines Lr m W 

BOLT THREADERS, "WEDGE GRIP" BOLT and 

RIVET HEADERS. FORGING MACHINES, NUT MACHINES, 

ROLL THREAD MACHINES, Etc., Etc 

Complete Catalogue " E" upon request. 

The National Machinery Co., Tiffin, 0., U.S.A. 



Canadian Agents: H. W. PETRIB, Toronto, Ont. 



WILLIAMS & WILSON, Montreal, Que. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 






88 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Forges. 

m Co., Hamilton 
Fran Montreal 

Independen Pneumatic Tool Oo 

Chicago. 111 
W - 

Ont. 

Forges, Oil Rivet. 

Franc ; » Hyde ft Co . Montreal 
W. 8 i We* r«* 

Forgings, Antomobile. 

3] . in ■< r. Ltd , Wei 

Forgings, Car. 

Billings I Bpenoer, Ltd , v el- 

Forgings, Drop. 
Bli- Brooklyn XT. 

Canadian Billm^s ft Bpenoer, Ltd., Wei 
land 

Forgings, Gasolene Engines. 

Ltd Wl 1:111.1 

Forgings, Light & Heavy. 

Canadian General ft Shoo Machy Co 

LeT' a 

Tin- Steel Do of Canada. Ltd , Hamilton 

Forgings, Dredge. 

Co., Ltd . Welland 

Forgings, Locomotive. 

.ban Billings ft Spencer, Ltd., Wel- 
land. 

Forgings. Marine. 

. Ltd . Welland 

Forging Machinery. 

John Bertram & Ron* Co , Pandas, Ont. 
Bli«.«. V.. W. C" . Brooklyn. NT. 
I^ondon Mach Too' Co.. Hamilton. Ont 
National Machinery Co.. Tiffin Ohio 
Ni'e«-Henif nt-Pnnd Co . New York. 
3t* M Aard ETineerng Co., Toronto 

Friction Clutches. 

Th. < wlvle Johnson Machine Oo . Man- 

1 ■nil. 

Friction Clutch Pulleys, etc 

The C.oldie ft McCuiloch Co., Gait. 
Wat <toub Engine Works Co., Brant ford. 

Frogs 

Montreal Steel Worm. Montreal 

Furnaces, Steel Heating. 

3 randar* Engineering Co . Toronto 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co , liar 
vey. HI 

Gang Planer Tools. 

Armstrong Bros. To^l Co.. Chicago 

Gas Blowers and Exhausters. 

Sheldon? Limited, "alt. 

Gas Producer Linings. 

Harbison-Walker Refractories Co , Pitts- 

l.U TV 

Gas Producer Plants. 

Bain ft Mitchell. Montreal 

The Cana<lian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 

Fielding ft Piatt Ltd.. Gloucester, Eng. 

Ganges, Standard. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Clevelond Twist Drill Co Cleveland 
Moi'« T»lt Drill and Machine Co.,Niw 

Red fo r 1 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn 

Gearing. 

, New York 

Gear-Cutting Machinery. 

The Canad'an Fairbanks Co , Montreal 

; ti Co . Hamilton 
York 

on Ma<h Tool (.'.. . Hamilton. 
Moras Twit Drill and Machine Co.. New 

Bedford 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co . New York. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co . Hartford. Coon. 

l hardt ft P'hutte. New York 

Gears. Angle. 

OaHner. P.oV . ft "ton, Montreal 
Goldie ft McCuiloch Co . C.alt, Ont 
Waterous Engine Co.. Brantford 

Gears, Out. 

Armstrong Bros , Toronto 

Gardner Robi ft Son, Montreal 

Goldie ft M'Culloch Co.. "alt. Ont. 

Johi treal 

New Process Raw-Hide Co. Syracuse 

Gears, Mortise. 

OaMnar, Robt ft Son, Montreal 
Goldie ft M'Culloeh Oo . Gait, Oot. 

k Ron, Montreal 
N«w Process Raw-HMe Co., Syracuse 
Waterou' Engine Works Co.. Brantford 



Gears, Rawhide. 



Gardner Robt.. ft Son, Montreal 
Goldie ft McCuiloch Co , Gait, Onl. 



John Milieu ft Bon, Montreal 

New Proosas Raw-Hide Co.. Syracuse 

Water a* Engine Worki Oo., Brantford. 

Gears, Reverse. 

The Ciitiyle Johnsiui Machine Co, Man- 
1 mn. 

Gears, Worm. 

Gardner Robt . ft Pon. Montreal 
John Milieu ft Ban, Montreal 

Generators, Electric. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Canadian Westinghouse Co , Hamilton 
Hull Engineering Worke. Montreal. 
Lancashire Dynamo and Motor Co., Ltd., 

Toronto 
Toronto ft Hamilton Eleotrlo Co., 

Hamilton. 

Grates, Shaking and Dumping 

Standard Engineering Co , Toronto 

Graphite. 

Rupert O. Bruoe Co., Ltd., Toronto 
.los Dixon Crucible Oo., Jersey City 
: Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
,Franci- Hycb & Co., wontrca. 
John Milieu ft Son, Montreal 
is. K B., Detroit, Mich. 

Grease Cups. 

Peterboro Lubricator Mftf Co., Peterboro 

Grinders, all kinds. 

Bath Grinder Co.. Fitchburg Mass. 

Grinders, Automatic Knife. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 
W. H. Banfield ft c on. Toronto. 
Waterous Engioe Works Co., Brantford. 

Grinders, Bench. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd.. Hamilton 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Grinders, Bench, Electric. 

United States Elec. Tool Co., Cincinnat 

Grinders, Centre. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New Vork. 
United States Elec. Tool Co., Cincinnati 

Grinders, Cutter. 

Bath Grinder Co., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Modern Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 
Pratt ft Wbltnev Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
Schuchardt ft Sehutte, New York 

Grinders, Disc. 

Armstrong Rron. Co . Chicago 
Bath Grinder Co Fitchburg, Mass. 

Grinders, Drill. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Grinders, Portable Electric, 
Hand. 

Tinted States Elec. Tool Co., Cincinnati 

Grinders, Tool. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago 
Bath Grinder Co., Fitchburg. Mass. 
Blount, J. G., ft Co., Everett, Mass. 

Grinders, Pedestal. 

Oanadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 

Grinders, Tool Post 

Holden Co., Montreal 

Grinders, Electric, Tool Post. 

United States Elec. Tool Co. , Cincinnati 

Grinding Holders. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Oo,' Chicago 

Grinding Machines. 

Bath Grinder Co., Fitchburg, Mass 
The Canadian Fairbanks. Montreal. 
Canadian Hart Wn o e's Ltd.. Hamilton 
Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co., Toronto 
Gardner Bobt., ft Son, Montreal 
Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 

Chicago. 111. 
Modern Too) Oo , EH", p». 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Grinding Machines, Portable, 
Pneumatic 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago 

Grinding and Polishing Ma 
chines. 

Gardner, Robt., ft Son, Montreal 

Grinding Wheels. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd . Toronto 

nadlan Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd.. Hamilton. 
Carborundum Co.. Niagara Fall* 

Wheel Co., Toronto. 
Muasens Limit* l. Mot treal. 

Hack Saw Frames. 

Mussens Limited. Montreal. 

, rit'hbiirg, Mass. 



Hammers. Belt Driven. 

Francl* Hyde ft Oo , Montreal 

Hammers, Drop. 

Bliss, E. W . Co., Brooklyn, NY. 
Canadian BUllngS ft Spencer, Ltd., Wel- 
land. 
Canadian Teates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Fr ncis Hyde ft Co. Mon'real. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Hammers, Pneumatic 

Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatio Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 

Hammers, Steam. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co. Dundas, Ont 
Oanadian Yeates Gordon Oo., Hamilton 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton, Ont 
MuPS"ns Limi ed. Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Hand Hoists & Trolleys. 

Whitl"g Foundry Equipment Oo., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Hangers. 

Fay, J. A., ft Egan Co., Cincinnati 
Gardner Robt. & So". Montreal 
The Goldie ft McCuiloch Co., Gait. 
Owen Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Round 
Positive Clutch & Pulley Works. Toronto 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co. , Hamilton 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Heating Apparatus. 

Darling Bro«.. Ltd., Montreal 
Matthews & Yates. Manchester, Eng. 
Sheldnns Limited. Gait. 

Hobbing Machine. 

Schuchardt ft Sehutte, New York 

Hoists, Electric and Pneu- 
matic. 

Advance Machine Works Ltd., Walker- 

ville, Oot. 
Northern Eng. Works, Detroit 

Hose, Air. 

Canadian Band Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Westinghouse Co.. Hamilton. 
Independent. Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago 

Hose, Steam. 

Canadian Band Co.. Montreal. 
Oanadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., 
Chicago. 111. 

Hydraulic Accumulators. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Niles-Beme-t-Pond Co . New York. 
TheSmar*-TuiTior MaehineCo., Hamilton 

Hydraulic Machinery. 

Canadian Veates Gordon Co , Hamilton 
The John Inglis Co., Ltd . Toronto 
Fieldin- ft Pl«tf. Ltd. Gloucester, Eng. 

Indicators, Speed. 

L. S. Sf.arrett. Co.. Athol. M»«. 
Schuchardt & Sehutte, New York 



Index Centres. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Inspecting Engineers. 

Walter R D 'okworth. Montreal 

Interlocking Plants 
Signals 

Montreal steel Works. Montreal 

Intersections, Railway 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Iron Filler. 

Imperial Waste & Metal Co., Montreal 

Jacks. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Fr»nei« Hv'f ft <~o. Montreal. 
H ft E Lifting Jack Co.. Waterville, Que. 
Montreal Steel Works. Montreal 
Norton. A. O. . Coaticook. Que. 

Jacks, Compressed Air. 

Canadian RandCo.. Montreal 

Jacks, Pit and Track 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Montreal Steel Wort's. Montreal 

Jaws, Face Plate. 

Cushmnn Chuck Co.. Hartford. Conn 
B E. Horton Machine Co., Windsor 
L'oks, Conn 

Key Seaters. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Lag Screw Gimlet Pointers. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio 

Lamps, Arc and Incandes- 
cent. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. 
The Packard Electric Co., St. Catharines. 



Lathe Dogs. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago 
Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

Lathes, all kinds.. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 

Lathes Bench. 

Blount. J G. ft Co.. Everett, Mass. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
London Mach. Tool Co., London, Ont. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Oonn. 

Lathes, Engine. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Champion Tool Works Oo., Cincinnati, O 

Fay ft Scott, Dexter, Maine 

G-rdner, Rnht. ft Son. Montreal 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

The Oanadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Out. 

R. McDcugallCo.,Galt 

Mussens Limited. Montreal. 

New Haven Mfg Oo. . New Ha^en, Conn 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Von Wyck Machine Tool Co., Cincinnati 

Lathes, Patternmakers. 

Fay ft Scott, Deiter, Maine 

Lathes, Screw Gutting. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Mussens Limited Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
Schuchardt ft Sehutte, New York 

Lathes, Speed. 

Mussens Limi led, Montreal. 

Lathes, Spinning. 

Bliss E. W., Oo., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Lathes, Turret. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Blount. J. G ft Co., Everett Mass. 
Bullard Machine Tool Co., Bridgeport, 0. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Mussens Limited Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
The Prattft Whitney Oo.Hartford.Oonn 
Warner ft Swasey Co., Cleveland. O. 

Link Belting. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 

Jones & Glassco. Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 

Linoleum Mill Machinery. 

Bertrams Limited, Edinburgh, Scotland 

Locomotives, Air. 

Canadian Rand Co.. Montreal. 

Locomotives, Electrical. 

. Canadian WestinghoUBe Co., Hamilton 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Montreal 

Locomotives, Industrial. 

Canadian Yeates Cordon Co., Hamilton 
Jeffrey Mfg Co., Montreal 

Locomotives, Steam. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 

Lubricating Plumbago. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde ft Co., Montreal. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 

and Machine Divided Rules. 

Lufkln Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 

Machine Tool Attachments. 

The S. E. Horton Machine Co., Windsor 
Locks, Conn. 



Machinery Dealers. 

The Oanadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co , Hamilton 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 
The Smart -Turner MaelrneCo. , Hamilton 
Schuchardt & Sehutte, New York 

Machinists' Scales. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Lufkin RuieCo., Saginaw, Mich. 

Machinists' Small Tools. 

The Oanadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Magnets, Lifting. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
Schuchardt & Sehutte, New York 

Malleable Iron Furnaces. 

Francis Hyde ft Co., Montre 1. 
Standard Engineering Co , Toronto 

Milling Machines, Lincoln. 

Garvin Machine Co., Now York 

Milling Machines, Double 
Face. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Milling Machines, Universal. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Schuchardt ft Bohutto, New York 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 89 

The Steel Company 
of Canada, Limited 

An Amalgamation of the following Companies : 

Canada Screw Co., Limited, : : ; : Hamilton 
Canada Bolt and Nut Co., Limited, : : Toronto 

The Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. ; Limited, Montreal 
The Hamilton Steel & Iron Co., Limited, : Hamilton 
The Montreal Rolling Mills Co., : : : Montreal 



Producers of 



BAR IRON BAR STEEL 

R.R. Spikes Angle Bars Tie Plates Bolts 

and Nuts Plain, Twisted and Deformed Bars 

for Reinforcement of Concrete 

PIG IRON 

Foundry Basic Malleable 

WROUGHT PIPE 

Merchant Black and Galvanized 

Nails, Screws, Tacks, Rivets, Washers, Horseshoes, 

Wire and Wire Fencing 

Head Office Hamilton, Canada 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



<)() 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Milling Machines, Worm. 

i 
Milling Machines, Plain. 

I Ma. lime Oo ,Cin 
oinnati 
Rearm y * Tit. Air Co . Milwau- 

, \I Iwauki i \\ ii 
Oo . Hamilton, Out 
M > lre»l 
Nile* Bern. Vork 

Prat! '. I pi ford, Conn. 

utti . Sen York 

Milling Machines, Profile. 

Btowk ft Sharp* MftOo .Frorldanos.B I 

John Bertram A Sons Co , Dun. las. Out. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co . Montreal 

'■' 

t 8 i ii' r«, N a York 

Milling Machines. Bench. 

Vork 

Mandrels. 

Rui> i . Toronto 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Cleveland Twis' Drill Co . Cleveland 

A B Jardine .v * <■ . HQapalar, Ont. 

Joh- 

Morse T»i-t Drill ami Machine I 

Bedford 
The Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford,Conn 

Maple Cogs. 

Water H rknCo . Brantford. 

Meters, Electrical. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co.Hamiton 

Vandelenr k Nichols, Toronto 



Mill Machinery. 



The C.oldie 4 MeCulloch Co., Gait, Ont. 
Pobb Engineering Co., Amherst, N.S. 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Milling Attachments. 

Brown & SbarpeMfgOo., Providence, R.I 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Cincinnati Milling Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati. 
Kearney & Trecker Co., Milwaukee. Wia. 
Kempsm'th M'g Co., Milwaukee, Wil 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York, 
Pratt * Whitney, Hartford, Conn. 

Milling Machines, all kinds. 

- Gordon Co., Hamilton 

Milling Machines, Horizontal 

Brown* Sharrie Mfg Co., Providence. R I 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundaa, Ont. 
Kempamith Mfg o.. Milwaukee, Wis. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Mu*sens Limited. Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Pratt * Whitney. Hartford. Conn. 
Brown & -harpe M fg Co. Proviri en 
John Bertram & Son Co., Dundas 

Milling Machines, Universal 

Cincinnati Milling Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati 
Kearney & Tre* ker Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Kempxmith Mfg Co , Milwaukee, Wis 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 
M' aaei-a Limited Mon real. 
Nllea-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Milling Machines, Vertical. 

Brown * Rharpe Mfg Co., Providence, R.I 
John Bertram & Bona Co., Dundaa, Ont. 
Ream > * I reoker ' o. Milwaukee. Wis. 
London Me/-h Tool Co , Hamilton, Ont. 
Mnsaenn l.im'ted, Montreal. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Milling Tools. 

Brown* ShTp- Mfg Co., Prnvidence.R.I 
Geometric Tool Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Ken nern't'' Mfg o . Milwaukee Wia. 
London Mach Tool Oo , Hamilton, Ont. 
Mu s*n- I. mi tad Iton're 1 
Pratt * Whitney Oo., Hartford. Conn. 

Mine Cars and Hitchings. 

The Canadian Fmirbavnki Oo , Montreal 

Mining Machinery. 

The enadlan Fairbanks Co Montreal 

Canadian Rand Co . Montreal. 

Bra 

Th< John tag-Ill i 

Jeffrey Mfg . Co., Mon real 

T * H Baetrli ( o Hamilton. 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantf rd 

Mortising Machines. 

Jones * Glaasco, Montreal 

Motors, Electric. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 
Canadian Westinghouse. Co , Hamilton. 
Hall Engineering Works. Mon real 
Lancashire Dynamo and Motor Co., Ltd . 

Toronto 
T. * H. Electric Co . Hamilton 



Motors, Air. 



Canadian Rand Co , Montreal 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Inde.endent rneumatic Tool Co.. Chi- 
cago. 



Multiple Index Centres. 

M bine. C" . New York 

Nail Sets. 

n,. | B iHalo, N Y 

Nut Burring Machines. 

on Oo . Hamilton 

lillin, Ohio 

Nut Machines (Hot.) 

National Machinery Co.. Tiffin, Kino 

Nut Facing and Bolt Shav- 
ing Machines. 

adieu Y'eaies Gordon c () ,, Hamilton 
Garvin Machine Co , New York 
National Machinery Co.. TifBn, Ohio 

Nut Tappers. 

John Bertram* Sons Co.. Dundas. Ont 
Canadian Y at s Gordon Oo., Hamilton 
Garvin v aclinic Co., New York 
Hall. .1 11 . ,t Son, Brantford. Ont. 
A B Jiirdine* Co., Hespeler. 
Ixindon Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio. 

Oil Extractors. 

Darling Bros.. Ltd., Montreal 

Oil Furnaces. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Threat e 

Oil Separators. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Standard Engineering Co., Toronto 

Oil Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheela td., Hasailfcna. 
Carborundum Co., Niagara Falli NT. 
Whiting Foundry Equlpe»ea» Oe, Bar- 
vey III. 

Pans, Lathe. 

Cleveland Wire Spriag Co., Olerelaae 

Pans, Steel Shop. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co.. Cleveland 

Papwi. Mill Machinery. 

Bertrams Limited. Edinburgh, Scotland 

Patent Solicitors. 

Cousins, C. C, Montreal. 
Hanbury A. Budden, Montreal. 
Fetherstonhaugh * Co., Montreal tnd 

Toronto 
Marion & Marion, Montreal. 
Ridout * Maybee, Toronto. 

Patterns. 

John Carr, Hamilton, Ont. 
Gait Mall able Iron Co., Gait 
Hamilton Pattern Works, Hamilton. 

Phosphor Bronze Castings. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

Pig Iron. 

The Steel Co. of Canada I td.. HamMton 
St vens. F. B.. De roit. Mica. 

Pipe Cutting and Thread 
ing Machines. 

Butterfield * Co., Rock Island, Que. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Curtis * < urtis Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
I ma Heap & Co., Ashton-on-Lyiie 
Eng. 
A. B. Jardine* Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co , Hamilton, Ont. 
Mm ens I, ■tiiiu-d Montreal. 
Nilea-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
Williams Tool Co.. Eiie, Pa. 

Pipe Screwing Machine. 

It Mc-Dougall Co.. Ga t 

Gan In Mi bine Co , Now Fork 

Pipe (Second Hand.) 

Imperial Waste and Metal Co. . Montreal 

Planer Drives, Electrical. 

Lancashire Dynamo and Motor Co., Ltd., 

Toronto 

Planer Jacks. 

Armstrong Tool Bros. Co. .Chicago 

Planers, Standard. 

John Bertram * Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Tb« Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

..da Machinery Corporation, Ltd., 

Ualt, Ontario 
Gard or Ito ,t * Son Montreal 
Garvin ' a.-hine Co., New York 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. Out. 
Mustens united, Montreal 
New Haven Mfg Co.. New Haven, Conn 
Niles-Bement -Pond Co., New York. 
Pratt* Whitney Co , Hartford Conn. 

Schuchardt k Sehutte, Now York 

Planers, Rotary. 

John Bertram * Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
l/>ndon Mach. Tool Co , Hamilton. Out 
Niles Beinent I'ond Oo., New York. 



Planing and Shaping Ma- 
chinery. 

Qarrin Uaohlne Co., New York 

Pliers. 

Canadian Billings * Spencer, Ltd., Wei 

land. 
Bi-liuchardt & Sehutte. New York 

Pneumatic Tools. 

Bliss, E. W., Co .Brooklyn, NY. 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co. 

Chicago, New Y'ork 
Mussens Limited, Montreal 

Polishing Materials. 

Rujiert G, Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Canadian Hart Wheel. Ltd , Hamilton 

Power Plant Equipments. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montrea 
Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Goldie * MeCnlloch Co., Gait, Ont. 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co. , Hamilton 
Standard Engineering U ., Toro. to. 
Waterous Eagine Works Co., Brantford 

Press Guards. 

Jones Safety Device Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Presses, Broaching. 

Bliss, E W„ Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Presses, Drop. 

W. H. rlanfleld * Bon, Toronto. 
E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Nllea-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Presses, Forging. 

Biles, E. W., Co., Brooklyn, N.Y 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
United Engineering tFourjdry Co., Pitts- 
barg 

Presses, Hydraulic. 

Jeha Bertram * Eons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co. .Hamilton, Ont. 
Nlles-Baraent-Pond Co., New York. 
United Engineering* FoundryCo., Pitts- 
burg 

Presses, Power. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
London Mach Tool Uo , Hamilton. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Pressure Regulators. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 

Protective Paint. 

Jos. Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey City 

Pulp Mill Machinery. 

Jeffrey Mtg Co., Montreal 

Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 

Pulleys. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Fay, J. A . « Euan Co., Cincinnati 
The Goldie & McOulloch Co., Gait. 
Oneida Steel Pulley Co., Oneida, N.Y. 
Owen Souud Iron Wor»s Co., Owen 

Sound 
Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Toronto 
Schuchardt * Sehutte, N«w York 
The Smart-Turner Machine Co., Hamilton 
Waterous hngme Co., Brantford. 

Pump Governors. 

Darling Bros.. Ltd. Montreal 
Standard Engineering Co., Toronto. 

Pumping Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hand Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Y'eaies Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Darling Broo., Ltd., Montreal 
Genera Supply Co of Canada, Ottawa. 
Goldie* MeCulloch Co., Gait, Ont. 
Hall Engineering Work- , Montreal, Que. 
The John Inglis Co , Ltd , Toronto 
London Mach. Too )Co„ Hamilton. Ont 
The Smart-Turner Mach. Co., Hamilto n 

Punches and Dies. 

W. H. Banfleld & Sons, Toronto. 
Bliss. E. W„ Co , Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Gardner, Robt .* Son Mom real 
Globe Machine * Stamping Co. 
A. B. Jardine * Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
London Mach Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Pratt * Whitney Co., Hartford. Conn. 
Russell Machim Co., 81 Catharines, On 
Schuchardt * Sehutte, New York 

Punches, Power. 

John Bertram fc Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
E. W. Bliss Co, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
Schuchardt & Sehutte, New York 

Punches, Pneumatic. 

Jno. F. Allen Co., New York 



Punches, Turret. 

London Mach. Tool Co., London, Ont. 

Punching Machines, 
Horizontal. 

Bertrams' Limited, Bdinbtuxh, Scotland 
John Bertram * none Co, Dundas, Ont. 
Ivondon Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Quartering Machines. 

John Bertram * Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont, 

Rail Benders 

Holden Co., Montreal 
Montreal St. el Works. Montreal 

Rail Braces 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Rails, Relaying. 

Imperial Waste & Metal Co., Montreal 

Rails, Steel 

Montreal Steel Works. Montreal 

Rammers, Bench and Floor 

Rupert G. BruceCo , Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde * < o., Montreal. 
Canadian Rand Co., Montreal 

Rapping Plates. 

Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co. Montreal. 
Stevens, F.B., Detroit, Mich. 

Raw Hide Pinions. 

Gardner, Robt., * Son, Montreal 
Mussens L<mi ed. Montreal. 
John Millen & Son, Montreal 
New Process Raw-Hide 3o., Syracuse, 
N.Y. 

Reamers. 

Butterfield * Co., Rock Island. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
A. B. Jardine * Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford, Mass 
Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Reamers, Adjustable. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Maohine Co., New 

Bedford 
Mussens Limited Montreal. 
Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford. Conn. 
Schuchardt * Sehutte, New York 

Reamers, Bridge. 

Butterfield & C-> , Rock Island, Que. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Reamers, Expanding. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Reamers, High Speed 

Cleveland Twi«t Drill Oo , Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Reamer Fluting Machines. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Reamers, Locomotive. 

Butterfield * Oi., Rook I-dand Que. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Cleveland Twist Drill O". < leveland 
Morse Tvfist Drill and Machine Co.. New 
Bedford 

Reamers, Pipe. 

Butterfl id * ., Rock Island. Que. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 
Bedford 

Reamers, Pneumatic 

Independent Pneumatio Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Reamers, Self-feeding. 

Butterfield & Oo , Rock Island, Que. 
t leveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 

Reamers, Steel Taper. 

Butterfield t Co., Rock Island. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co. Cleveland 
A. B. Jardine * Co., Hespeler. Ont. 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 
Pratt * Whitney Co., Hartlord, Conn. 

Rheostats. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Canadian Westinghouse Co.. Hamilton. 
Hall Engineering Works, Montreal, Que. 
T * H. Electrio Co., Hamilton, 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



91 



MONTREAL STEEL WORKS, limited 

P.O. Box 2369, MONTREAL 



Manufacturers of 

STEEL CASTINGS 

(Acid Open Hearth System) 

SWITCHES AND TRACK WORK 

for Steam and Electric Roads 

SPRINGS 

of all kinds 

MANGANESE STEEL CASTINGS 

for wearing Parts, insuring Great Hard- 
ness and Durability 

INTERLOCKING PLANTS 

TRUCKS FOR FLECTRIC CARS 




AGENTS FOR CANADA FOR 



Barrow Haematite Steel Co., Barrow-in-Furness, England 

Quotations for Tee Rails, Fish Plates, etc., promptly furnished. Catalogues sent on application. 







Sheets &nd jilales - aoiy width u)i to 50 inches , 

emy thickness uji to one inch . 
Merchant bars, sheeting and heavy jbrqinq of all kinds. 

PIG IRON FOR FOUNDRY USE. 



UNSURPASSED 
EVAPORATION 

HIGHEST IN CARBON 




LOWEST IN ASM 
BEST ALL ROUND 
STEAM COAL. 



The Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company 

LIMITED. I ^ 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



02 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Rivet Machines. 

\ ■ , Ki hlnaq Oo . ItBn, Ohio 
Rivets, Tubular and Bifur- 
cated. 

Pitmanlvri Bulloch Co.. l.anaotoui'. 
Out 

Riveters, Hydraulic. 

i 
Riveters, Pneumatic. 

x ■ York 

BIim. K W Oo . Brooklyn, H Y. 

i t re:il 
Canadian Band Co., M 

Ion Co., Hamilton 

11 I . • M 

Independent Pneumatlo Tool Co. 
Chicago. 111. 

Rolls, Bending. 

John Bertram * Sons Co.. Dundas. Ont. 
London Mach Tool Co . Hamilton, Ont. 
Nllet-Bement-Pond Co . New York. 

Roll Thread Machines. 

n M -> ( . Tiffin, ohin 

Rotary Converters. 

Canadian Westlnghouie Co., Hamilton 
Toronto and Hamilton Elactric Co., 
Hamilton 

Rubber Mill Machinery. 

. na Limited. Edinburgh, - 

Rubbing Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 

Rules. 

I.u/kin Rule Co , Windsor, Ont. 

Saw Mill Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Oo., Montreal 

lift] Y ate* Gordon Co.. Hamilton 
Far. J At Egan Oo., Cincinnati 
Gainer R ht . ft Son. Montreal 
Goldie ft McCulloch Co Gait. 
The John [nglilOo . Ltd . Toronto 
J llrrf Mfj Co.. Montreal 
Mnutni Limited. Montreal, 
Oiran Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 

Sound 
Rcbb Fngineering Oa., Amherst, N.S. 
Watarous Engine Works. Brantford 

Saw Filing Machines. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton 

Saws, Hack. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Diamond Saw and Slumping Works, 

B do 
(Jar i in Machine Co , Ni-w York 
Hermann Boker ft Co , Montreal 
London Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton 
John Milieu .t Son. Montreal 
Nile -Bement-Pond New York 
L. S. Btarrett Co.. Athol. Mass. 

Saws, Circular Metal. 

Bimondi Htg C . Pitchburg, Mass 

Screw Machines, Automatic. 

London Mach Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

MoMem Limited Montreal. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Screw Machines, Hand. 

...elian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 

Yeates Oordon Do., HamUton 

■:. Co . Hen York 
A II Jardine ft Co., Hespeler 
London Mach. Tool Co , Hamilton, Ont. 
Mussen* L-mited. Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co . Hartford. Conn 
Warner ft Bwasey Co., Cleveland, O 

Screw Machines, Multip.e 
Spindle. 

Mussens Limited, Montreal. 

Screw Plates. 

Butterfleld ft Co., Rock Island, Qua. 
A B Jardine ft Oo fleipeler 
Mom Twist Urill and Machine ( 
Bedford 

Screw Slotters. 

York 
irg. Mass. 

Seamless Steel Tubing. 

John M 

Second-Hand Machinery. 

Canada Forge Co , Welland 



Owan Sound Iron Works Co., Owen 
Sound 

• Clutch ft Pulley Works. Toronto 

it nei Machine Co , Hamilton 

Oo., Hamilton, om. 

Waterous Engine Oo . Brantford. 

Shanks, Straight and Taper. 

l II ford, Conn 

Shapert. 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
Canada Machinery Corporation, Ltd., 

Gait Ont. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Gardner I obt . ft Son. Montreal 
I/mdon Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton, Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
Pratt 4 Whitney Oo., Hartford. Conn. 
Jin. StettoeShap r Co., Cincinnati. 
1 nion Drawn Steel Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Sharpering Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd.. Hamilton 
Carborundum. Co., Niagara Falls. N \ 

Shearing Machine. Bar 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont 
A B. Janiine ft Co , Hespeler. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. 
Nlles-Bement-Pcnd Oo.. New York. 
Sobuchardt & Schutte, New York 



Shears, Power. 



Shafting. 



John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, 
Blls«. K. W . Co., Brooklyn. NY. 
Canadian YeateB Gordon Co . Hamilton 
National Machinery <~„ .Tiffin. Ohio 
Nlles-Bement-Pnnd Co.. NewYork. 
Sohuchardl ft Schutte, New York 

Shears, Pneumatic. 

John F.Allen Co., NewYork. 

Sheet Metal Working Tools 

Bliss, E.W., Co., Brooklyn, NY. 

Shovels, Electric. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 

Shovels, Steam. 

Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
Holden Co., Montreal 

Shoe Machinery. 

Canadian General ft Shoe Machy. Co., 
Levis Que. 

Side Tools. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago 

Silver Lead. 

Detr Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Fran Hyde ft Co., Montreal. 

Sleeves, Blacksmith's Drill. 

Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo 

Sleeves, Taper Drill. 

Keyst ne Mfg. Co., Buffalo 

Slotters. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

New Haven Mfg Co., New Haven, 0"nn. 

Sockets. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland 
Keystone Mfg. Co , Buffalo 
Morse Twist Drill and Machine Co., Naw 
Bedford 

Solders. 

Tallinan Brass .\; Metal Co., Hamilton 
Lumen Bearin Co. Toronto 

Special Machinery. 

Armstrong Bros., Toronto 
W II Banfleld ft Sons, Toronto. 
Bewdon Mai bine & Tool Co , Toronto 
John Bertram & Sons Co. DundaB, Out. 
Bliss, E. W ., On , Brooklyn, N Y. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Hart Wheels Ltd., Hamilton. 
Canadian Yeates Oordon Oo.* Hamilton 
Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Jardine, A. B., ft Co . Hespeler, Ont. 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton. Ont. 
MoKenzle, D . (Juelph. Ont. 

Machine Co . Si Catharines, Ont 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Spike Machines. 

Th( Smart Tumei U m I In Co , Hamilton 

Spring Coilers. 

Mai hini Co , New York 

Springs, Coiled Wire. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland 

Springs, Machinery. 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co., Cleveland 



Sheldon's Limited. Gait. 
TOe Smart-Turn i MuhineCo., Hamilton 
standard Engine ring Co., Toronto 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 

Steam Specialties. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Sheldon's Limited. Gait. 
Standard Engineering Co., Toronto 

Steam Traps. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Darling Bros., Ltd.. Montreal 
Sheldons Limited, Gait, 

Steel, Nickel Chrome. 

Schuchardt & Schutte, New York 

Steel Pressure Blowers. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Francis Hyde ft Co.. Montreal. 
Sheldon's Limited, Gait. 

Steel, High Speed. 

Fdear Al'en & Co. Mont-eal 
Hermann Boker ft Co.. Montreal 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal. 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Alex. Gibb. Montreal. 
Jessop. Wm., ft Sons, Sheffield, Eng. 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 
Mu3sens Limited, Montreal. 

Steel Tubing, Seamless. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 

Stocks, Pipe. 

Butterfleld & Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Stokers, Mechanical. 

Standard Engineering Co., Toronto 

Straightening Machinery. 

Bertrams Limited. Edinburgh, Scotland 
Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 

Surface Grinders. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

Switchboards. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co.. Hamilton 
Hall Engineering Works. Montreal, Que. 
Toronto and HamUton Electric Co., 

Hamiton. 
Vandeleur & Nichols, Toronto 

Switches Railway 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Tanks, Steel. 

Goldie ft McCulloch Co., Gait, Ont. 

'lape Measures. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 

Tap Wrenches. 

Butterfleld ft Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Tapping Machines and 

Attachments 

John Bertram ft Sons Co.. Dundas, Ont 

Garvin Machine Co., New York 

The Geometric Tool Co., New Haven 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler. 

London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Taps, Adjustable. 

Geometric Tool Co, New Haven, Conn. 

Taps and Dies. 

Butterfleld &Co., Rock Island, Que. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montieal 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland 
A. B. Jardine &Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Morse Twi-t Drill and Machine Co., New 

Bedford 
Mussens Limited. Montreal. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 
L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Testing Laboratories. 

Toronto Testing Laboratory, Toronto 

Tests and Inspections. 

Bain & Mitchell, Montreal 

Thread Cutting Tools. 

(ituvin Machine Co., New York 



Tire Upsetters or Shrinker 

A. B. Jardine & Oo. Hespeler, Ont. 

Tool Holders. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 
Cleveland Twist Dril' Co.. Cleveland 
KejBtone v fg. Co., Buffalo 
Pratt ft Whitney Co., Hartford, Oonn. 

Tool Posts, Lathe. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago 

Tool Steel. 

Hcmann BoVerft Co. Montreal 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
Canadian Wales Gordon Co., Hamilton 
A exander Gibb. Montreal. 
Wm. Jessop, Sons ft Co., Toronto. 

Tools, Electrical. 

Holden Co., Montreal 
United ' tates Electric Tool Co., Cin- 
cinnati. 

Tools, Lathe, Planer an<! 
Slotter. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co , Chicago 

Torches, Steel. 

Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde ft rio , Montreal. 
Stevens, F. B., Detroit. Mich. 

Track Tools 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Transformers and 

Convertors 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Canadian Westinghouse Co., Ham 'ton 
Hall E"gineer|ng Works, Montreal, Que 
T. ft H. Electric Co., Hamilton 

Transmission Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 

Goldie ft MrCullorh Co., Gait, Ont. 

Jones & Glassco. Montreal 

Mussens Limited. Montreal. 

Positive Clutch & PuUoy Works. Toronto 

The Smart-Turner Machine f"o. , Hamilton 

Waterous Engine Co.. Brantford. 



Trolley Wheels. 



■ 'ai.ada Forge Oo . Wetland 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal 
lot Co Hamilton 
Fay. J A . ft Egan Co.. Clnol natl 
Gardner R-bt ft S' n . Montreal 
The Goldie ft McCulloch Co . Gait. Ont 
Nllee- Bement-Pond Co ,, New York. 



Stay Bolt Drilling Machines. Tiling, Opal Glass. 



MaCbin Oo . N' W York 

Steam Separators. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 

Darling Bros ., Ltd , Montreal. 

Rol.l, Engineering Co., Amherst, N.H. 



Toronto Plate Glass Importing Cj., To- 
routo. 

Time Recorders. 

W. A. Wood, Montreal 



Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 
Lumen Bearing Co., Toronto 
John Millen & Son, Montreal 



Trucks, Electric. Car 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Tubes, Boiler. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 

Tubes, Mechanical. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 

Tube Expanders (Rollers). 

Holden Co., Montreal 

A. B. Jardine & Co , Hespeler. 

Turbines, Steam. 

Canadian WestinghouBe Co., Hamilton 

Turnbuckles 

Canadian Billings & Spencer, Ltd., Wei 

land. 
Montreal Sttel Works 



Turret Lathes. 

The Bullard Machine Tool Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn 
Garvin Machine Co., New York 
Mussens I imited, Montreal. 



Unions. 

Dart Union Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Upsetting and 

Bending Machinery 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas, Ont. 
A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler. 
Kellogg ft Co.. Toronto 
London Mach. Tool Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
National Machinery Co., Tiffin, O. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Valves, Back Pressure. 

Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Sheldon's Limited, Gait. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



93 



Valves, Steam. 



Darling Bros, Montreal 

Standard Engineering Co , Toronto 



Valve Reseating Machines. 

Darling Bros., Ltd., Montreal 

Ventilating Apparatus. 

Darling Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal 
Matthews & Yates, Manchester, Eng. 
Sheldon's Ltd., Gait 



Vises, Bench. 



Canadian Yeates-flordon Co., Hamilton 

Prentiss Vice Co., New York 

Jas Smart Mfg. Co.. Brookville, Ont. 



Vises, Pipe. 



Canadian Yeates Cordon Co., Hamilton 
Prentiss Vise Co., New York 



Vises, Planer and Shaper. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co.. Hamilton 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Vises, Milling Machine. 

Canadian Yeates Gordon Co., Hamilton 
Schuchardt & Schutte, New York 



Washer Machines. 

National Machinery Co., Tiffin, Ohio. 

Waste and Wipes. 

Imperial Waste & Metal Co., Montreal 

Watchmen's Clocks. 

W. A. Wood, Montreal 



Welding Compounds. 

Philllps-Laffitte Co., Philadelphia 

Welding Plates. 

Fhillips-Laffitte Co., Philadelphia 

Wheelbarrows. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde & Co., Montreal. 



Window Wire Guards. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Expanded Metal and Fireproofing Co. 

Toronto. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wire Chains. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Wire Cloth and Perforated 
Metals. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Oo., Hamilton 
Expanded Metal and Fireproottr.g Co., 

Toronto. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton. Ont. 



Wire Guards and Railings. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Expanded Metal and Fireproofing Co. 

Toronto. 
B. Greening Wire Oo. Hamilton, Oot. 

Wire Nails. 

Parrnenter & Bullock Co., Gananoque 

Wire Nail Machinery. 

National Machinery Co., T.Ohio. 



Wire Rope. 



B. Greening Wire Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
John Millen & Son, Montreal 



Wood Boring 
Pneumatic. 



Machines 



Independent 
Ohioago, 111. 



Pneumatio Tool Co., 



Wood Boring Tools, Pneu- 
matic 

Holden Co., Montreal 

Wood Refuse Collecting 
Plant. 

Matthews & Yates, Manchester Eng 



Woodworking Machinery. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Fav, J. A , & Egan Co., Cincinnati 
Goldie & McCulloch Co., Gait. 
Waterous Engine Works Co., Brantford 



Wrenches. 

Canadian Billings & Spencer, Ltd., Wel- 
land. 



Wrenches, Automobile Nar- 
row Jaw. 

Bemis & Call Hardware and Tools 

Springfield, Mass. 
John Millen & Son, Montreal 



Wrenches, Automobile 
Monkey. 

Trimont Mfg. Co., Roxbury, Mass. 

Wrenches, Basin. 



Bemis * Call Hardware and Tool Co 
Springfield, Mass. 



Wrenches, Chain. 

Bemis * Call Hardware and Tool Co. 

Pprinenel 1 , Mass. 
Trimonl Mfg. Co., Roxbury, Mass. 



Wrenches, Monkey. 

Bemis & Call Hardware and Tool Co. 
Springfield, Mass. 

Trimont Mfg. Co., Roxbury, Mass. 

John Millen & Son, Montreal 



Wrenches, Pipe. 



Bemis & Call Hardware and Tool Co., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Trimont Mfg. Co., Roxbury, Mass. 

Ret d Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 



Wrenches, Ratchet. 

Keystone Mfg. Co., Buffalo 




The Small Knurled Wheel Provides for Quick 
Readjustments 

B. C& S. SPEED 
INDICATOR 

This indicator has overcome one of the most serious 
drawbacks to the older styles of such tools— the tedious turn- 
ing back of the rotating disc by hand after a reading has 
been obtained. 

This quick adjustment is an exclusive B. & S. feature secured 
by means of the small knurled wheel on the side of the case 

Among the other features which should be mentioned are the following : It registers on either 
side, the dial on front determining the velocity of shafts and spindles running in one direction, and 
the reverse side the speed of those running in the opposite ; it is small, light and convenient to handle. 

Send for a Special Folder, mailed on application 

Brown C& Sharpe Mfg. Co. 

Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



94 



I \ \ \ O I A N F O U ft D R Y M A M 



CANADIAN FOUNDRYMAN BUYERS' DIRECTORY 

To Our Readers— Use this directory when seeking to buy any foundry or pattern-shop equipment. 

You will often get information that will save you money. 
To Our Advertisers— Send in your name for insertion under the heading of the lines you make or sell. 
To Non-Advertisers— A nominal rate of $1 per line a year is charged non-advertisers. 



Alloys. 

Hantaan k >ker kOo , Montreal 

Fraae :. n> la I Oo . Montreal. 
Barrels, Tumbling. 

- pply t . w 
P. ancm Hy .e a Ou . .Montreal. 
N.-nhrrn Engineering Works, Detroit 

■ U Umited Gait 
Wh unit Foundry- Equipment Co., Har 
vey, III. 

Blowers. 

Hruce Co., Ltd., T ronto 
. ladiaji Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
i I Windsor 

- 1 1 > . 1 - A l .... M litre*'. 

Manchester, Eng 
\\ '. H York 

Sheluou's Liuiiteu, G»lt 

Blast Gauges— Cupola. 

Rupert G Bruce Co, Ltd , Toronto 

H) da a. i o . .Moiureai. 
1. i, ak 

Brass Melting Furnaces. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
rr»iiLi8U> c4t'o. Mo. tr.a. 
W & Rockwell Co., New York 
Wnt in* Fuu-a y kqmi'iiie i Co., Har- 
vey 111. 

Brushes, Foundry and Core. 

Rupert G. Bruce ' o., Ljd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry .Supply Co., Windsor 

- Ii>ue A. Co., .u, u i real. 
Suvens F. a. Dtr it. Mich. 

Burners, Core Oven. 

Rupert i>. Bmca Co , Ltd., Toronto 

a Hyde at Co.. .Montreal. 
\v B Rockwell Co , New York 

Cars, Core Oven. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
F anon Hy .e a; C\>.. Montreal. 
Vthiung Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
tey.Ill. 

Cars, Foundry. 

Rupert O. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Detroit Foundry .Supply Co., Windsor 
Frauds Ilyue & l o , .Mont , eal. 
Shetoons Limited, Gait 
Wniting Fo .nd.y Equipment Co , Har- 
ney. LI 

Charcoal. 

Ruj,erl G Bruce Co , Ltd., Toronto 
1» il Foundry Supply O., Wind-oi 

I rancia Hyde & Uo. .Montr a'. 
Ftevens F H., Detroit. Mich. 

Core Binders. 

Robeson Process Co., Au Sables Forks, 
N Y 

Core Box Machines. 

Francis Hyde i Co.. Montreal 

Core Cutting-off and Coning 
Machine. 

Ruj.- 1 , Toronto 

franc. s Hyde a Co.. Montre 

Core Compounds. 

I rorto 
ndsor 
Moo real. 
Stereos. F B., Detroit, Mich. 

Core-Making Machines. 

i T . ronto 
M DtTOal 
i u-ioi,, F B . Detroit, Mich. 

Core Ovens. 

Bam 1 Toronto 

hikM s Hy<.e a Co., Montreal 

looa Limited. Gall 
.Standard En*!! earing o . T ronto 

aa, - B . D troll. Mi' b 
Whit ng Foundry Equipment Oo., II »r 
vey, 111. 

Cranes, Electric and 
Hand Power. 

Adv.- M . WnrV.. Walkenille 

nl real 

land, O. 
Can* Montreal. 

Gardner Root Son Montreal 
Fian- is Hyde i (\, Montreal. 
Mus-ens Limited Mo treal 
NUea-Bement-Porid Co , New York. 



Northern Engineering Works. Detroit 
1 1« en Sound Iron Works Co , Owen 

hound 
Whitin. Foundry Equipment Co. , Har- 

iey. III 

Cranes, Hydraulic. 

Whiiiug Fouudiy Equipment Co , Har- 

Try, 111. 

Crucibles. 

Rupert Q. Bruoe Co., Ltd., Tor, nto 
li..i,ry, .luuiiuau, Cru.luie Co., Trtn- 

lon. N J. 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Joseph Dixon CruciineCo., Jersey City 
Fi.li.muyatia^, Alontieal. 
o.eveno. F. B,. Detroit, JViich. 

Cupolas. 

Adv.. nee Machine Works, Walkerii le 
Rupert G Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit F'oundry Supply Co., Windsor 
James Dougail a eons, Ltd., Bonny 

bridge, acuiland 
George Green u Co., Keighley, Eng. 
Franc s H,ue a Co. M litrial. 
Noitheni Engineering Works, Detroit 
Scrutan Trust, W2 Eastern Townships 

Bank Bunding, Montreal 
Sheluuus Liunteu, Gall. 
Wh tmg r-ounury Equipment Co. Har 
vey, 11L 

Cupola Blast Gauges. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde a oo., Mon.real. 
Sheldona Limited, oalt 

Cupola Blocks. 

Rupert G Bruce > o., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Harbison- Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Francii Hyde & Co. Montreal. 
N oi thern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Ontario Lime Association, Toronto 

Cupola Blowers. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co. , Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Sheldon s LiniiU d. Gait 



Cupola Linings. 



Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd., Toronto 
Harbison- Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Fraiicio Hyde a Co., Montreal. 
S evens, F. B.. Detroit, Mich. 

Cupola Twyers. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
1- roiicis Hyde a < o., Montreal. 

Fans, Exhaust. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd., Tor nto 
The Canadian Fair hanks Co., Montreal 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
F'raucis nyue a \ o.. Mon real. 
.Matthews ft Y'ates, Manchester, Eng. 
hheidous Limited, Gait. 

Fillers (Metallic.) 

Shelton Metallic Filler Co., Derby, Conn 
Rupert G Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
-oiiootD-On Mfg. Co., JerBey City, N.J. 
Stevens. ¥. B., Detroit Miefa. 

Fillets, Leather & Wooden 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 

Fire Brick and Clay. 

Rnper Q Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
lii i roil Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Jama Dougalla Sons Ltd. . Bonny oridge, 

land 
Harbison Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Fr ,ii i« Hyde a Co.. Montreal 

render Gibb, Montreal 
W e Marshall. H7 King W. Toronto 
Ontario l.ime Association Toronto 
- I i! Detroit, Mich. 
I Fir- Brick Co , Uniontown, Pa. 

Foundry Coke. 

. Ltd., Toronto 
I'raium Hyde & Co . Montrea 
' in. F. B , Detroit, Mich. 

Foundry Equipment. 

1 . Ltd , Toronto 
tge Green a Co., Keighley, Eng. 
Francis Hyl a<o M..inrea . 
Northern F.riKineerinir Work* Detroit 

i Trust, 502 Ea-lern Townships 
Bank Building, Montreal 
Stevens. F. B. Detroit, Mich. 



Whiting Foundry Equipment Co , Har 
vey. Hi. 

Foundry Parting. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyue a Co., Montieal. 

Foundry Facings. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundiy Supply Co., Windsor 
Jos. Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey City 
1'raiii'u iiyi.o a Co , ft, out real. 
Stevens. F. B. , Detroit, Mich. 



Furnace Lining. 



Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Hai bison-Walker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burg 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal 

Furnaces. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit F'oundry Suppiy Co., Windsor 
A.treu Fioher, Ci Kate HI 
Francis Hide a Co.. Montreal. 
The John Inglis Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Noi, heit. Engineering Works, Detroit 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 
Stcieut, F B., Detroit, Mich. 
Whit ng Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Furnaces, Brass. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
r rami 11) .e a Co. Mont eal. 
W. S. Rockwell Co., New York 
Whiting rounury Equipment Co , Har- 
vey, III. 

Hoisting and Conveying 

Machinery. 

Geo. Anderson a Co., Montreal 
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
Goldie a McCulloch Co , Gait, Ont. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co , Montreal 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 
No.-<hern Engineering Works. Detroit 
Waterous Engine Co., Brantford. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, Hi. 



Hoists, Electric. 



Beath W. D , ft Sou, Toronto 
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Hoists, Pneumatic. 

Canadian Rand Co., Montreal. 
Holden Co., Montreal 
Indepeiment Pneumatic Tool Co., Chi- 
cago. 
MusreuB Limited, Montreal 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co. Har- 
vey, 111. 

Iron Cements. 

Rupert G. Bruce ( o., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde . Co , Montreal. 
bmooth-On Mfg Co., Jersey City, N.J. 

Iron Filler. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., W indsor 
Francis Hyde iio Montreal. 

Montreal 
Smooih-On Mfg. Co., JerBey City, N J. 
Stevens, F. B., Detroit, Mich. 

Ladles, Foundry. 

Rupert G. Brace Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Fiancis Hyde a Co.. Montreal. 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Stevens F B.. Detroit, Mich. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
v.y, 111. 

Melting Pots. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francii Hyde a Co., Montreal. 

Molders' Tools 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 

Molding Machines. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Fra cb Hyde a Co. Mont eal. 

• in ario Wind Engine & Pump Co., 

Toronto 
Steven- F B . Detroit Mich 
Tabor Mfg. Co., Philadelphia 

Molding Sand. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 



Francis Hyde & ' o. Montreal. 
Stevens F. B Detro t. Mich 

Oil Furnaces. 

Rupert G Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 

i'ailrrn Shop Equipment. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd., Toronto 
Fay, J. A. a Egan, Cincinnati 
Francis Hyde a Co.. Mon real 

Plumbago. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Franc s Hyd>= tC „ Montieal 
St vens, F, B , D troit, Mich. 

Ramming Plates. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 

Riddles. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co , Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montieal. 
Stevens F. B., D.t oit, Mich. 

Sand Blast Machinery. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Canadian Rand Co.. Montreal. 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde & Co , Montreal. 

Sand Molding 

Rupert G. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co. Montreal, 
Stevens F. B , D* troit, Mich. 

Sand Sifters. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd.. Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co , Montreal, 
itevens, F, B.. Detroit, Mich. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Oo. Har- 
vey, 111. 

Sieves. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 

Snap Flasks. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 

Spruce Cutters. 

BliBS E. W., Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry Supply Co., Windsor 
FraDCis Hyde a Co., mom real. 
Stevens. F. B., Detroit, Mich. 

Talc. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Detroit F'oundry Supply Co., Windsor 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 

Track, Overhead. 

F ancis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har 
vey, Jll. 

Trolleys. 

Beath, W. D , a Son, Toronto. 
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montieal 
Canadian Rand Co., Montri al. 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 
John Millen a Son, Montreal 
Northern Engineering Works Detroit 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey Id. 

Trucks, Dryer and Factory. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co. Ltd., Toronto 
Francis Hyde a Co., Montieal. 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Sheldon's Limited, Gait, Ont. 
Whitimr Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Turntables. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Detroit Foundry supply Co., Windsor. 
Fr. ncis Hyde a Co., Montreal. 
Northern Engineering Works, Detroit 
Stevena, F B, Detroit Mich. 
Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Har- 
vey, 111. 

Wheels Polishing. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Wire Wheels. 

Rupert G. Bruce Co., Ltd., Toronto 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



96 





We are introducing a new line in 






GRINDING WHEELS: 




Dominion Abrasive Wheels 




These wheels are made by the 






vitrified process, recognized as 






the BEST in the world. We 






use the very best emery and 






artificial abrasives combined 






with a special bond of our own. 






We produce a fast cutting 






wheel, which will not draw 






the temper of your tools and 






which we guarantee to be thor- 






oughly satisfactory. 






WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS. 






Dominion Abrasive Wheel Go. 






LIMITED 






New Toronto, Onl. 






FIRE 
BRICK 

for 

Cupolas-v 






The standard Fire Clays by which all other 
Clays are judged are those of Pennsylvania. 

They're the ones from which our Cupola 
Brick are made. 

The cost per thousand means nothing un- 
less you know the results the Brick are 
giving. 

Write us for definite examples of how our 
material affects your melting costs. 



HARBISON- 
WALKER 
REFRACTORIES 

COMPANY, 

PITTSBURGH, 
PENNSYLVANIA 




Electroplaters' Supplies, Foundry Facing and Equipment 



Galvanizing Salts 
Nickel Salts 
Nickel Anodes 
Zinc Anodes 
Copper Anodes 




Canvas Wheels 

Felt Wheels 

Bull Neck Wheels 

Muslin Buffs 

Tripoli and 

Buffing Compositions 



ary 
Plating 
Apparatus 



Electro Galvanizing and Plating 

Our Mechanical Plating Apparatus will plate large quantities of small work in bulk, will save TIME, 
LABOR and EXPENSE, and in many instances will eliminate the necessity of buffing after plating. 
To prove their merits we will plate sample lots free of charge. WRITE FOR BULLETIN 1 1 7. 

RUPERT G. BRUCE COMPANY, Limited 



PHONE OftOO 
MAIN OUOO 



96-98 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



% 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Daily Grind \ 

The daily grind of mechanics engaged in using 
abrasive wheels is made much more effective if 
their machines are fitted with 

CANADIAN HART CORUNDUM WHEELS 

Our wheels are free and fast cutting, porous, safe, 
and very durable. Send for our catalogue which 
describes the various processes used in making 
Canadian Hart Corundum and Emery Wheels. 

CANADIAN HART WHEELS, LIMITED 
Hamilton, .... Ontario 




ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



A 

Allen Co.. John F 14 

Allen, K.dg-rftOo 14 

Ale<«nd-r En .raring Co 23 

Anders rc,(l'0..tCj J8 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co 19 

Armstrong Bros 69 

B 

Baiid £ Wart 7? 

Banfleld, W H.ftSons 6» 

Hartley Jonathan. C uciMe Co 41 

Bass te Smelting ft Mfg. Co 65 

Kail, ' 7 

and Tool Co 23 

Kami' * CIi H* d war- & Tool Co .... 1 

nery Mfg. Co 29 

Bertram, John, ft Sons, outside front cover 

Bllas. E. W . Co 21 

Blount. J Q , Co 20 

Boker H- r 'nan & Co 1 1 

» 69 

British Aluminium Co 6) 

' nti-h <'.'alo<ue Register 77 

Brou '4 

H» irn ft sharne Mfg Oo 93 

Browning 1 Co 72 

Bnif • • '-'"> 

Budden, Hant.ury A 74 

Bollard Ma Co 9 

Butterfleld A Co 84 

c 

Canada PoTge Oo 14 

'i S 

Canada Metal (Jo 20 

far,., 75 

Canadian Billings 

Canadian Fairhai 32 

Cs>D*jdiaD' : erirral& Shoe Ma' liinerj Oo 12 

Canadi.n Hart Wheel*. Ltd 

Canadian Rand Co 30 

Canadian Westln«hou»e Co 1 

I lordon Co 1 

CariOMindum Co 

67 

..13 

i bapman Double Ball Bearing Co.... 87 

Cincinnati Millies Mu< nine Co 7 

8 Iceland T»i»t brill f o 84 

leiaian'i Win spring Co 63 

'■ t Bon 23 

Cum- * Curtis to 

Ooshman Chuck Co 

D 

DarliDg Bros, Ltd 28 



Dart Union Co 65 

Detroit Foundry Supply Oo 82 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works 16 

Dixon, Joseph, Crucible Oo 68 

Dominion Abrasive Wheel Co 95 

Dominion Belting Co 69 

Duckworth-Boyer Engineering and In- 
spection Co 74 

E 

Expanded Metal and FireprooflngOo. 70 

F 

Fay & Scott 72 

Fay, J. A., ft Euan Co 12 

Fetherstonhaugh & Oo 74 

Fox Machine Co 72 

c 

Gait Malleable Iron Co 75 

Gardner, Robt A Son 22 

f JartBhort- , John J 67 

Garrio Machine Co 4 

(i'-oinetric Tool Co ... 18 

Qlbb, Alex 84 

Glohe Ma • hiii" ft Stamping Co G'/ 

Goldie ft McCulloch Co 27 

Ihue. J. S fcOo 30 

Green ft Co., Geo 80 

Greening, B., Wire Oo 75 

H 

Hall Engineering Works 74 

Hamilton, Win 69 

l"i'. > at'ern Wo'ke 67 

inaon-Walkei Refractories Co 95 

H ft E Lifting Jack Oo 22 

if' 1 1 Jo ihoa 16 

H i' n ' o Th' io 

1 1 orton Mi E 67 

Hyde, Francis, ft Co 83 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co 23 

Inglis, John, Co 27 

J 

Co 20 

Jardine. A B, ft Co D3 

Jeffrey Mfg Co 74 

.lesson, Win., ft Sons 68 

.I,,r,"« * Claasno 31 

70 

K 

Kearney ft Trecker Co 6 

Ktmpmith Mfg Co 9 



Ker ft Goodwin 66 

Keystone Mfg. Oo 21 

L 

Lancashire Dynamo ft Motor Co 28 

Levy, R.J 17 

London Machine Tool Co 2 

Lutkin Rule Co 83 

Lumen Bearing Co 64 75 

M 

Magnolia Metal Co 29 

Matthews ft Yates 25 

McDougallOo.,R Inside hack covir 

McLaren, J. O., Belting Co 64 

Marion ft Marion 74 

Millen&Son Ltd., John 16 71 87 

Modern Tool Co 6 

Montreal steel Works Oo 91 

Morse Twist Drill and Machine Oo. ... 84 

MortonMfgOo 8 

Morrow, John 70 

Musaens Limited outside back cover 

N 

National Machinery Oo 87 

New Havtn Mfg Co 3 

New Process Raw Hide Co 24 

Nicholson File Co 21 

Niles-Bement-Pond inside front cover 

Northern Engineering Works 71 

Norton, A. 23 

Norton Co 63 

Nova Scotia Steel ft Coal Co., Ltd... 91 

o 

Oneida Steel Pulley Co 24 

Ontario Lime Association M 

Ontario Wind Engine ft Pump Co ... . 81 

Owen Sound Iron Works 69 

P 

Parker Foundry Co 31 

Park-ftLeith 68 

Parment-r ft Bullock Co 69 

Paison, J. W., Co 74 

Peterboro Lubricator Mfg Co 28 

Phillips-Laffltte Co 63 

Positive Clntcfa ft Pulley Works 24 

Pratt ft Letrhworth 68 

Pratt ft Whitney Co inside front cover 

Prentiss Vise Co 22 

Pringle, R. E. T 10 



R 

Ridout ft Maybee 74 

Robb Engineering Oo 26 

RobertBon, J. M 74 

Robeson Process Co 81 

Rockwell Co., W. 8 22 

Russ 11 Anti-Fric ion Drill Chuck Co 17 20 

Russell Machine Co 74 

s 

Sadler 4 Ha worth 70 

School of Mining 74 

Schuchardt ft Schutte 25 

Scotia Engineering Works 79 

Scott, Ernest 69 

Sheldons Limited 25 

Sinionds Canada Saw Co 66 

Slocomb Co , J. T 5)3 

Sly, W. W., Mfg. Co 80 

Smart-Turner Machine Oo 71 

Smiths Falls Malleable Castings Co ... . 66 

Smooth-On Mfg. Co 73 

Standard En. ineering Go 76 

Starrett, L. 8„ Oo 18 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 89 

Stevens. Frederic B 79 

Swift Motor Car Co 74 

Tabor Mfg Co 78 

Tallman Brass and Metal Oo 73 

Technical Pub. Co 70 

Toledo Electric Welder Co 17 

Toronto and Hamilton Electric Oo 23 

Toronto Pattern Works 67 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co 63 

Toronto Testing Laboratory 64 

Trimont Mfg Co 11 

u 

Union Drawn Steel Co 23 

United Engineering and Foundry Co. 19 

United Mrebrlck Co 79 

United States Electrical Tool Co 11 

V 

Van Dorn ft Dutton Co 10 

Von Wyck Machine Tool Co 13 

w 

Warner ft Swasey Co 3 

Waterous Engine Works Co 26 

Whinton Machine Co., D. E 22 

Whitimr Foundry Equipment Co 78 

Williams Tool Co 8 

Wood Waste Distillers Co 64 67 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



THIS NEW GAP LATHE 

WILL INCREASE YOUR PROFITS 




INCREASED speed and efficiency means increased profits. This new gap lathe increases speed 
and efficiency for the following reasons:— The extra strong gap gives absolute rigidity. The 
construction of the carriage and apron is such that they will not spring under the most severe 
strain. Headstock will not chatter. Tailstock fitted with quick acting locking device- Tail- 
stock adjusted from the top. Friction safety feeds give quick changes of thread. Eighteen distinct 
spindle speeds by double back gears. Specially graduated dial on the gear box. Adjustable to 
thousandth of an inch both ways by graduated compound rest. Ring oilers give perfect self lubri- 
cation. Greatest strength, accuracy, solidity and wear. Full equipment with each lathe. 

Headstock construction prevents chattering, and deep oil chambers fitted with ring oilers make spindles and bearing's 
self-oiling and always well lubricated. 

Tailstock of a special type, and sleeve is clamped by a quick acting locking device. Tailstock is secured to bed by bolts 
adjusted from the top where they are easily accessible. 

Bed, non-springing and webbed, and braced to secure rigidity. 

Gap, vibration absolutely prevented by use of brace supports to carriage. 

Spindle, high carbon hammered steel in solid chilled cast iron bearings, accurately fitted and self oiling. 

Carriage and Apron, non-springing under severest strain, full "V" bearings and flat bearings in addition on front ways. 

Double Back Gears give eighteen distinct spindle speeds, suiting lathe to work on widely different diameters. 

Compound Rest, with graduated base, accurately fitted taper gibs, end adjusted. Screws in both rest and cross slide 
read to thousandths. 

Friction, Safety Feeds, screw and rod feeds cannot be both engaged at the same time. Quick changes of 1%, 2 x / 2 
and 5 times thread being cut. 

Gears and Racks, cut from solid and steel where necessary. 

Screw Cutting, full range of commercial threads provided for. 

Equipment, Compound rest, steady rest, follow rest, large and small face plates, wrenches, two-speed, friction counter- 
shaft furnished with each lathe. 

Accuracy, Strength, Solidity, Wear. These are the paramount features behind all McDougall Machines. 
Made to meet extreme demands. 

Write for Particulars 

The R. McDougall Co., Ltd. 

GALT, ONTARIO 

Canadian Fairbanks Company, Sales Agents Cable Address : Dougalt, A. B.C. 5th edition 



Don't fail to mention adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



I Pili^fl liP(>^Ui<lM»», 



NO UP-TO-DATE MACHINE TOOL SHOP 
IS COMPLETE WITHOUT OUR FULL 



Universal Radial Drilling Machine I 



Length of arm, 4 ft. 2 in. 



Drills holes up to VA inch. 






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MONTREAL 



HEAD OFFICES: MONTREAL 

ITORONTO COBALT WINNIPEG CALGARY VANCOUVER 



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The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX ON LAST PAGE 



GnadianMachinery 

# Manufacturing News ~* 

A monthly newspaper devoted to the manufacturing interests, covering in a practical manner the mechanical, power, foundry 
and allied fields. Published by The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, and London, Eng. 

MONTREAL, Eastern Townships Bank Bldg. TORONTO, 143-149 University Ave. WINNIPEG, 511 Union Bank Building. LONDON, ENG.. 88 Fleet Street, F C 



Vol. VII. 



Publication Office: Toronto, March, 1911. 



No. 3 




BRIDGE and BOILER SHOP 
MACHINERY 



.i 





BERTRAM SINGLE BEAM and CHANNEL PUNCHING and COPING MACHINE— Mot :>r Driven. 
WRITE FOR PHOTOGRAPHS AND PARTICULARS. 

The John Bertram Qb Sons Co., Limited 

DUNDAS, ONTARIO, CANADA 
Agents:— The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd. Offices:— Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Calgary, St. John, Saskatoon. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



A Machine for Manufacturing 

And it looks it not a frail or weak part in the entire construction. It is a machine 
meant for business to do business on a manufacturing basis — an economy basis. 

It is a business builder, not only on account of its wonderful latitude — its flexibility 
and adaptability but on account of its stability its staying qualities — its continued accur- 
acy — its wonderful control and ease of manipulation — its duplicate manufacturing that does 
away with all bench work. Turns out every piece of work fully finished — and interchange- 
able—ready to be assembled castings, forgings or rod work. 

And the tool outfit — once complete always complete, to meet any manufacturing 
demands. That is 

The Turntable Lathe 

With Cross-Sliding Turntable 

It has the design, weight, power and construction behind it. Bar capacity 2 l /z x 26 in. 

Swing 20 in. 

Write for Catalog, " The Turntable Lathe." 

P. ®> W. 2% x 26-in. TURNTABLE LATHE 
Arranged for Bar Work 



J. -£ 




I 



1 Speed Changing Lever 

2 Rod Stop 

3 Chuck Lever 

4 Speed Back Gear Lever 

5 Stock Feed Lever 



6 Turntahle Binder 

7 Transverse Stop Change Knoh 
*" Transverse Stops 

9 Index Abutments 

10 Feed Disengaging Lever 



11 Keed Engaging Lever 

12 Transverse Feed Hnndwheel 
13. Longitudinal Feed Stop Lever 

14 Carnage Binder 

15 Longitudinal Stops 



16 Feed Reverse Lever 

17 Feed Changing Lever 

18 Feed Back Gear Lever 
18 Oil Pump 



Montreal 



Pratt C& Whitney Co. 

HARTFORD, CONN. ; U. S. A. 

Sales Agents— The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Limited 
St. John Toronto Winnipeg Calgary 



Vancouver 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






Canadian machinery 



Equally Handy for Nut 
or Pipe Work! 



Here's a tool that should find 
a place in every mechanic's 





kit, the 



99 



"B and C 

Combination Wrench 

It does the work of two ordinary 
wrenches, and is made of very best 
materials, and well finished. 

Head, bar and shank are a one- 
piece steel forging. 

Send for complete Catalogue 
of Wrenches. 

Bern is & Call Hardware 
and Tool Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U.S. A 




S & S AUTOMATIC 

Gear Mobbing Machines 

One of our customers 
writes us: 

"We were using six automatic gear cutters in our 
works, but since putting in your machine we have 
been able to turn out as much 
work on jour machine as on any 
three of the others and with 
greater accuracy." 




This great output and accuracy are not only due to the Hobbing 
System, but also to the rigid construction and right distribution of 
weight in our machine The patented features of our machine place 
it in a class by itself. 

Write for Particulars 

SCHUCHARDT & SCHUTTE 

4 Cedar Street, NEW YORK 
Montreal Office, 307 Coristine Building 




Compressor on Stand 



Westinghouse 

IO2 Cross-Compound Air Compressor 

For Industrial Work 

The Westinghouse 10^ " Cross-Compound Compressor at 
a normal speed of 13 strokes per minute, operated on a 
steam pressure of 100 lbs , working- against 80 lbs. air pres- 
sure, has a displacement capacity of 150 cubic 
feet of free air per minute. 



It is a compact, self-contained unit, compounding both air 
and steam, thereby securing a very high efficiency with a 
low steam consumption per 100 cubic feet of air compressed. 

Canadian Westinghouse Co v Limited 



Traders Bank Build in* 

TORONTO 

439 Pander Street 

VANCOUVER 



Genera] Office and Works, HAMILTON, ONT. 

For Particulars Address Nearest Office: 52 Victoria Square 

HAMILTON MONTREAL 

158 Portace Avenue East 311 8th Avenue West Telephone Bldg. 

WINNIPEG CALGARY HALIFAX 




Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



\\DTAN MACHTNRRY 



Important Announcement 




By special arrangement with the R. K. Le Blond Machine -Tool Co., 
ol Cincinnati, we are now enabled to offer for the first time in Canadian 
Machine Tool History, Lathes made in Canada from designs based on the 
wealth of experience afforded by the United States market, the greatest 
machine tool market in the world. 

By this arrangement we have obtained not alone the designs, but also the 
jigs and other fixtures which make for accuracy, interchangeability, and 
produce unequalled workmanship at a minimum of cost. 

The above Lathes represent the very last word in Lathe Construction. 
Powerful, yet accurate and easily handled —designed for getting the 
greatest amount of work with a minimum of expenditure of energy on the 
part of the operator. 

Details of construction will appear from time to time in our advertisements. 



London Machine Tool Co., Limited 

HAMILTON, CANADA 

Eastern Agents Rudel-Yeates Machinery Co., 610 Canadian Express Building, Montreal, Que 



Don't foil to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



s 



HOLLOW HEXAGON TURRET LATHES 



They are constructed 
to meet the approval 
of the most exacting 
purchaser. The 
design and detail 
have been worked 
out on mechanical 
principles and as a 
result a most Simple, 
Powerful, Econom- 
ical and Efficient 
machine has been 
produced to meet the 
requirements of gen 
eral machine shop 
practiceion'Bar Stock 
as well as Forgings. 




Hollow Hexagon Turret Lathe. 



SIZES 

No 1. Turns Diameters up to I 'A inches. 
No. 2. Turns Diameters up to 2'4 inches. 
No. 3. Turns Diameters up to 3 l A inches. 



Lengths up to 18 inch.'t. 
Lengths up to 24 inches. 
Lengths up to 36 inches 



Write for full details. 




THE WARNER & SWASEY COMPANY 



Main Office and Factory 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Canadian Agents : A . R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto, and Williams & Wilson, Montreal 



0= 



EH 




Would You Put a MAN 
at a BOY'S JOB ? 



Why tie up a 14" or 16" Lathe on a 
job which can be handled to better 
advantage on a HARDINGE 
BENCH LATHE of 7" SWING. 

Consider the convenience of install- 
ing the HARDINGE STANDARD 
BENCH equipment. 

These Benches are make in six, 
eight and twelve foot lengths, to carry 
one, two or three Lathe combinations. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Hardinge Brothers, Inc. 

3133-3141 Lincoln Avenue 
CHICAGO - - ILLINOIS 



Write for Illustrated 
Catalogue No. 190. 



TWO LATHfc COVIBINA'I N 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Garvin Double-Geared Dividing Heads 

For Accuracy and Fine Work 

Appreciated most by those who have experimented with the other kind. 

Heads are put through the most rigid inspec- 
tion before leaving shop and have been highly 
commended by users for their accuracy and 
rigidity under the most exacting cuts. The 
heads 

Divide all numbers to . . . 150 
Numbers divisible by 2 and 5 to 300. 
Numbers divisible by 3 to . . 360 
Dividing mechanism undisturbed. Accuracy 
maintained when changing for quick index- 
ism. As may be seen by sectional cut, the 
horizontal and vertical positions can be in 
stantly located. Note the spindle with a 
ground taper bearing its entire length, being 

solid with the dividing gear, which is of large diameter and is located as near the work as possible. 

Wedge take-up for wear in dividing gear. Many other valuable features. Manufactured in three 

sizes, 10, 12, and 14 inches, and are part of the equipment furnished with our Universal Milling 

Machines. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ! as U?e%s%1r!ct op 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Garvin Machine Co. 

Spring and Varick Streets - 




45 years in N EW YORK CITY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Universal, Plain, Hand, Vertical, Lincoln, Duplex, Profile and Vertical Spindle Milling Machines; Surface, Cutter 
and Tool Grinders; Die Slotters : Screw Machines ; Monitor Lathes ; Automatic Chucks ; Screw Machine and Milling 
Machine Tools and Attachments; Automatic, Horizontal and Vertical Tapping Machines; Duplex Drill Lathes; Gang 
Drills- Hand Lathes; Screw Slotting Machines; Spring Coiling Machines; and Special Automobile Machinery, Etc. 



I he advertiser -would like to know where xuu saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



LATHES 

Shapers, Planers, Slotters, Punches, Shears 

Latest Designs, Finest Workmanship 




Note the appearance of this machine. Hundreds of them in use, 
and every one giving satisfaction. One grade only and that the best. 

Write for Catalogue. 

Canada Machinery Corporation, Limited 

GALT, ONTARIO 
Agents : 

A R. Williams, of St. John, Limited A R Williams, Limited, Toronto. A. R. Williams, of Winnipeg, Limited. 
Williams &. Wilson, Limited, Montreal. A. R. Williams, of Vancouver, Limited 

Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Bath No. 2 Universal Tool Room Grinder 

EQUIPMENT C. 

Adapted to all classes of grinding: 

Cylindrical, Surface, Disc, 
Internal and Cutter Grinding 

of all descriptions. Thernachine is 
equipped with power automatic 
cross feeds for cylindrical and sur- 
face grinding. The one machine that 
can be truly classed as a complete 
universal. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

BATH GRINDER CO., Fitchburg, Mass. 

— FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVES — 
CHAS. CHURCHILL & CO., Limited, London, Birmingham, Manchester, Newcastle-on-Tyne and Glasgow. . 





You Pay for the Bullard Vertical Turret 
Lathe Whether You Buy It or Not 

.Vnd the longer you wait, the more you pay. 

IF YOU ARE NOT USING THIS MACHINE YOU 
PAY FOR IT, NEVERTHELESS, WITH THE MONEY 
LOST BY YOUR PRESENT METHODS OF PRODUC- 
TION OF ALL FACE PLATE WORK WITHIN THE 
?.ANGE OF THE VERTICAL TURRET LATHE. 

This loss is caused principally 
by ivasfecf time. 

The fundamental principle of the Vertical Turret 
Lathe is the "elimination of wasted time." 

Time between cuts is reduced by centralized control 
>f the operation of the whole machine, as well as by rapid 
|i iwer traverse of all parts. 

Willi both a Turret and a Side head, machining of 
several surfaces at once is possible — Multi-Cutting. 

And all the tools needed for a series of operations are 
held in instant readiness. 

In all, every possible moment of the machine's and 
f e operator's time is utilized and made efficient. 

Ask for Treatise on Face Plate Work C-15. { 

The Bullard Machine Tool Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Every Up-to-date Machine Shop should have a 

"MODERN" Universal Grinder 

Its many points of superiority over ordinary universal grinders are fully described 
in our illustrated catalogue, a copy of which will be mailed to you 

FREE ON REQUEST 



We would also be glad to place our experience at your disposal. 

This machine is more rigid and durable, and is better made than most grinders' 
and it produces more work and better work than any similar machine made. 

Among the many improvements incorporated in the Modern Universal Grinder 
is our new patented table hand wheel stop, which STOPS HAND WHEEL 
WHILE TABLE IS IN MOTION, thereby eliminating the shock from the quick 
reverse of the hand wheel. 

Made in two sizes — sold at interesting prices. It will be worth your while to 
write us before buying. 

MODERN TOOL CO. 

Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 

Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in vtriting to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Morton Draw-Cut Railroad Shaper 




Thisshaper will crown and plane 
axle boxes, plane the brass shell 
to fit, and plane shoes and wedges 
at a saving of from 25 to 40 per 
cent, over ordinary methods. This 
machine is also equipped fordo- 
ing a general line of shaper work. 

For further particulars address 

The Morton 
Manufacturing Company 

MUSKEGON HEIGHTS, MICH. 

Also builders of Cylinder Planers and a full line of 
Draw-Cut Pillar Shapers. 




Capacity 1 V, to 6 inch pipe ; Bolts '> to 2:4 inch 



No. 3 Williams Pipe Machine 



Has every device for convenience, 
durability and speed. 

The Williams Pipe Machines are 
made in six sizes: %" to 2" ; y 2 " 
to 3" ; 1" to 4"; VA" to 6"; 2" to 
8" and 3^" to 12". 

Designed for strength and accur- 
acy, and unexcelled in efficien- 
cy, steady service and reasonable 
cost. 



Send for 
Description and Prices. 



\A/II_I_IAIVIS TOOL OO 



Box ia 



rie. Pa., U. S. A. 



The advertiser would like to know where vou saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Cincinnati Handiness 




WHEN you have a job of end or face milling 
to do on a Horizontal Miller, don't you 
find it hard to operate the feed lever and 
at the same time keep your eye on the cutter ? 
That's because the machines you are using can be 
operated from only one place. Our new High 
Power Machines have an additional feed !ever at 
the side of the knee. 

The operator can stand close up to his work, 
with the cutter in full view, and control the ma- 
chine from this position. 

With this one lever he can operate and re- 
verse table, cross or vertical feeds. 

The main starting lever is immediately in 
front of him and the speed and feed changers are 
at his elbow, so that the entire machine is under 
complete control from here. 

ASK FOR THE CATALOG. 



The Cincinnati Milling Machine Company 

Milling Specia'ists 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agent— H. W. PETRIE, Ltd., Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. 



1 




THE MILWAUKEE 



No. 3B Universal Miller 

is one of a line of Plain and Universal Mill- 
ing Machines for heavy duty service having 
great weight and structural strength in com- 
parison with range. Powerful drive through 
single pulley as shown or at right-angles. 
Electric drive applied without difficulty at any 
time. All gears and bearings automatically 
flooded with oil. Every machine equipped 
with pump for cooling and lubricating the 
cutters and with means provided for return- 
ing the cutting lubricant to its reservoir. 
Wide table for jig work with ample bearings 
for maintained accuracy. Accurate screws 
with sensitive graduated adjustments — all 
adjusting and feed screws have ball thrust 
bearings. Dividing wheel double the size 
usually used— accuracy equal to the best. 
Let us send you more particulars. 

Kearney & Trecker Co. 

Manufacturers - Milwaukee, Wis. 

Agent*: 

The A. R. Williams Mach'y Co., Toronto 
Williams & Wilson - Montreal 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



10 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Machinery Always Busy 

These three words express one of the essential 
requirements of a profitable machine shop 
business machinery that is always earning 
its keep. 

There is no need for you to tie up capital in 
separate drilling and tapping machines when 
you do not expect to use each machine con- 
stantly. It will pay you better to install a 

"Ban" Combined 

Drilling & Tapping Machine 



Barr combined machines 
will do better drilling and 
better tapping, and do 
them quicker, than the 
general run of separate 
drilling and tapping 
machines. 

It means a saving of floor 
space as well as a saving 
of capital investment. 

We can also give you a 
power feed, lever feed 
and tappers in any com- 
bination having from two 
to seven spindles to a 
machine. 



AGENTS 
WANTED 
For Other 
Territory. 




Write for Our Catalog. 

H. G. BARR 

WORCESTER, MASS., U.S.A. 

Agents for Eastern Canada : 

Williams & Wilson, Montreal 



Where Agents do not handle our machines, we will 
accept orders direct. 




FOR TURNING OUT WORK OF 
LARGE DIAMETER 

An Extension Gap Lathe pays big returns. 

Our lathes of this type are always reliable and 
accurate to a nicety. 

Simply sliding the top bed varies the gap to 
suit all requirements. 

Cut shows our 20-42 inch type. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 

FAY & SCOTT, DEXTER MAINE, 



CANADIAN AGENTS- 



US.A. 

Williams &. Wilson. Montreal. Que. 
A. R. Williams Machinery Co.. Toronto 
A. R. Williams Machinery Co.. Winmpee 
General Supply Co.. of Ottawa, Canada 



John H. Hall & Sons 

BRANTFORD 

CANADA 





New Double Head Rapid Nipple and 
Pipe Threading Machine 

Manufacturers of all sizes of 

Pipe THreading 

AND 

Nipple Machinery 

SPECIAL FEATURES 

MODERN DESIGNS 



Let Us Know Your Requirements. 



Don't fail to mention ■Canadian Machinery" m -writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



11 



K empsmit H MILLERS 

are now being made in our model new 
plant, where every detail has been care- 
fully planned by experts for its function 
in the manufacture of these machines. 

The facilities for handling materials, 
both rough, in process of construction 
and finished : the manufacturing equip- 
ment ; the manufacturing system ; the 
convenience for the workmen ; and 
so on — all combine for perfection of 
construction of these machines 

THE KEMPSMITH 
MFG. CO. 

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 

Canadian Agents: 
RUDEL-YEATES MACHINERY CO., MONTREAL 




=NEW HAVEN LATHES— 

One of the leaders among our celebrated line of lathes is that illustrated below — our 

24 inch Swing Standard Lathe 

Like all NEW HAVEN TOOLS, it is conspicuous for its accuracy, reliability and 
durability, and each machine is thoroughly tested before it leaves our shops. 
Guaranteed unreservedly. Write for detailed specif ications and illustrated catalogue. 




uun i /an to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



>vvwv%wvw\^vwvwwww^^wwv^^^vwww^^ 



OUR 
No. 264 SELF-FEED RIP SAW 

Embodies in its construction all features that are necessary for the satis- 
factory handling of light or heavy 
material 

It is equally efficient in ripping SHORT or LONG 
Stock. Both the in-feeding and out-feeding roll 
may be adjusted close to the saw, permitting short 
stock to be fed without trouble. 

The Feed Rolls may be instantly raised, converting 
it into a hand-feed machine when desired. 

The table raises and lowers to accommodate 
different thicknesses of stock. 

Capacity — Rips 4 in. thick with a 16 in. saw, 
and 8 in. with a 24in. blade. Takes 19in. between 
saw and fence. 

WRITE FOR LARGE ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR 

J. A. Fay & Egan 
Co. 

362-382 W. Front Street 

CINCINNATI OHIO 

No. 264 Self-Feed Rip Saw. 




A High-Grade Small Engine Lathe at Moderate Cost! 



You can use one in YOUR shop. 




Canadian Agents 



T^REE from fussy 
attachments and 
mere talking points, 
the Von Wyck 15- 
inch engine lathe 
offers such a combi- 
nation of conveni- 
ence and economy 
that operators 
maintain, "It is un- 
equalled by any 
lathe of its swing." 

TITHY buy a large 
size and pay a 
big price to get great 
strength and effici- 
ency ? Von Wyck 
design and con- 
struction are thor- 
oughly high grade 
in every important 
detail and satisfac- 
torily cover an un- 
usualrange of work. 



The advertiser would Hke to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



H- 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



The Quick Feed and Thread Changes on 

a CHAMPION 
LATHES 

Are so easily made that they are in strik- 
ing contrast to the many so-called quick- 
change devices which wear the patience 
of the operator in hauling, pulling and 
jerking levers to shift gears, that there 
is little wonder lathe hands don't take 
advantage of feed changes, but instead 
run on practically one feed 

These changes on the Champion are 
so simple and comprehensive that the 
operator on learning how easily and 
quickly they can be made, takes ad- 
vantage of the correct feeds and speeds 

without fear of complications. 
16-in Quick Change Lathe. 

Write for Our Catalogue of 10-12-14-16 and 18-inch Lathes; Quick Change or New 
Standard, with or without Taper Attachment, Draw-in Attachment, Turrets, etc. 

CHAMPION TOOL WORKS COMPANY 



l:; 




D 



Station B 



CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 





The Valley City Combination 
Disc and Surface Grinder 

is an especially advantageous machine for 
tlio pattern shop and for all kinds of tool 
and surface grinding. The very substan- 
tial construction, body of machine one 
scdid casting, eliminates vibration and 
contributes to accurate product. All con- 
veniences — rapid adjusting screws, tilting 
table, micrometer adjustment for upper 
table, rest for tool grinding — a complete 
and efficient machine. 

Full line includes Wet and Dry Grinders. 
Combination Machines. Buffing and Pol- 
ishing Machines. 

Send for Catalogue. 

Valley City Machine Works 

20 Compau Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 




^ 



OUH UADLXS 




HOLD YOUR ORDER 




for 

POLISHING, 

BUFFING 

or 

GRINDING 

Machinery 




until you have 
examined our 
new catalog". 

The line is 
perfect in 
design, well 
finished, and 
smooth run- 
ning, and is 
guaranteed 
to give highly- 
satisfactory 
service in 
every respect. 



We invite the fullest enquiry Write also for details of our 
Speed Lathes and Wet Tool Grinder. 

J. G. Blount Company 

EVERETT, MASS., U S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



14 



f \ V \ P T A N MACHINERY 



KLLLY f 

™ BUSINESS END 

15 aP|.SMALL PART </ 

THE KELLV HAS ^(^ 
, v w THAT PART ONL^T 

CATALOG? v ^ J 3^ 

KELLYRLCORDS, 1200 HOURS 

WITHOUT ATTENTION, GIVING JSIZE, AND FINISH 




0) 



TURRET BAR WITH 
BORING TOOL 

AHEAD OF 

1FL0ATING REAMER, 




THE KELLY REAMER CO. 






j^gftSKgg&g 




TOS^M 





@ 



CLEVELAND U.S.A. 



Ask if the long blade docs anything but damage — after the. business end gets 
through — by giving an over-size hole? 

Machine ream your parts to a ten-thousandth with a Kelly Floating Reamer,- and 
your long bladed reamer will "go" along with the old "chipping chisel." 

Let us tackle your very toughest reaming job — it will be "easy" for us and will 
mean dollars for you. 

State exact size of hole, size of boring bar desired, and do it on your trial order 
to-day. Tell us all about your job. We must know all the details. 

Type C for Cylinders. Type B for turret, drill or lathe. 
3" to 12" carried in stock. 1" to 5^ u carried in stock. 
A 5" shell reamer costs you net $17.33 J nas A^ H to 5" Kelly costs net $5.00, has adjust- 
no adjustment, is soon under size and— junk, able, replaceable, high speed blades —they last. 

QUICK ACTION 

After getting a No. 2 $15.00 Kelly Turret Bar, which holds i%" to 5^" reamers, you 
can wire US for any size of reamer and we will land it on your desk the following day 
via Mail. 

Ask about Cylinder reamers . — Catalog C. We do it that way — Kelly. 

THE KELLY REAMER CO. 

CLEVELAND, U.S.A. 



/ he advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell htm. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



IS 



You are SURE of the 



Fastest and Tightest Riveting 

at the LOWEST COST, with 




ALLEN 



ORTABLE 



NEUMATIC 




RIVETERS 

Merit is built into every part of these machines. Their design and construction 
combine all the latest improvements in power riveters and insure the maximum 
results at the minimum cost. 

We have recently placed Riveters with the Manitoba 
Bridge and Iron Works, Winnipeg, Manitoba ; and 
Wm. P. McNeil & Co., New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. 

Sena for our Catalogue, "Riveting 
7*"lacnines. It will interest you. 

"Whatever the Riveting — There's an ALLEN for the Job." 

JOHN F. ALLEN COMPANY 



Established 1872 



370-372 Gerard Avenue, New York 

AGENTS— CANADIAN RAND DRILL CO., Toronto, Halifax, Montreal 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



lti 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




High-Speed Steam-Hydraulic Forging Presses 

Double your production with one-half your labor cost and steam consumption. Cost of 
repairs reduced Eliminates heavy shocks and vibration. 

"SINGLE LEVER CONTROL" 

Small sizes — single-frame type. Large sizes — four-column type. 

Built for doing all classes of forging, shearing or pressing. 

100 Tons to 12,000 Tons Capacity 
UNITED ENGINEERING & FOUNDRY CO. 

2305 Farmers Bank Building, PITTSBURG, PA 
EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS FOR UNITED STATES. CANADA AND MEXICO. 
Manutactured under Davy Bros., Ltd., Patents. 




HEAP'S 



High Speed BOLT and 
PIPE THREADING 
Machines are made in 
all sizes with Single and Multiple Heads, 



Protectei' b- 1 Patents 



Our New Patent Die Head is the most simple and the 
only mechanical Die Head on the market. 
The dies are not operated by springs with their attendant 
troubles. 

Before placing your orders enquire closely into our claims. 
Send for Catalogues 

Joshua Heap & Co., Limited 

Ashton-under-Lyne, England 

Canadian Agents : PEACOCK BROS., Montreal 




Hig'H Speed Steel Has a Solid Foundation 
In a Name TKat Means Something 

Cutting speed attained on cast iron : Roughing cut, 140 ft. per minute — finishing cut, 210 ft. 
per minute. 

In NOVO SUPERIOR you secure a materially increased speed over the high speed steels now in 
use, the highest quality, greatest toughness, longest life (3 times that of any other) and exceptional 
ability to cut very hard materials. The cutting edge retains its sharpness from 3 to 4 times longer 
than other high speed steels. Hardens in oil, air or water, and is now carried in stock in our ware- 
house in all current sizes, flat, squares and rounds ; annealed and unannealed. 

SEND US A TRIAL ORDER AND CONVINCE YOURSELF 

HERMANN BORER (EL COMPANY 

332 ST. JAMES ST.. MONTREAL 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



Canadian Machinery 



17 




Edgar Allen & Co., 



Limited 



Manufacturers of 



TRAMWAY POINTS and CROSSINGS 

Tramway Passing Places, Junctions, 
Depot Sidings, Lay Outs 

Supplied complete with all Fittings ready for 

laying on the road. 



OVER 20 YEARS' EXPERIENCE 



Sole makers of 



ALLEN'S 




MANCANESE STEEL 



Manager for Canada— THOMAS HAMPTON 



330 ST. JAMES STREET 



MONTREAL 



Don't jail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 






18 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Millions of Feet 

of 

Seamless Steel Tube 

SHIPPED FROM OUR MILLS EACH YEAR 

This demand has been created by manufacturers 
requiring a high-class mechanical tubing, containing 
a reasonable percentage of carbon, capable of good 
finish and ready manipulation, at an economical 
price. Some of the articles being manufactured to 
advantage with our tube are: 






ADDING MACHINES 

AEROPLANES 

AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY 

AMMUNITION HOLDERS 

AXLES 

BABY CARRIAGES 

BEDSTEADS 

BICYCLE PARTS 

BOILER COILS 

CANES 

CREAM SEPARATORS 

DIE STOCK HANDLES 

DISPLAY FRAMES 

ELEVATOR CAGES 

EXHAUST TUBES 

FIREARMS 

GAS FIXTURES 

GO-CARTS 

HAND RAILINGS 

HOSE MANDRELS 

LAMP BRACKETS 



LAWN MOWERS 

MAGAZINE TUBES 

METAL FURNITURE 

MOTORCYCLE PARTS 

OPERATING TABLES 

ORNAMENTAL OFFICE FURNITURE 

PNEUMATIC TOOLS 

PUMPS 

RATCHET DRILLS 

SANITARY FURNITURE 

SCREW PLATE HANDLES 

SHOVEL TANGS 

STEERING LEVERS 

STEERING POSTS 

STEERING WHEELS 

STOVE GUARD RAILS 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

SWORD SCABBARDS 

TELEPHONE DESK STANDS 

VACUUM CLEANER HANDLES 

WHEEL BRACES 



Accuracy to Diameter and Gauge is Assured, • 

The Standard Welding Co. 

Electric Welding Pioneers 

CLEVELAND 



L. F. MoClernan 
1243 Peoples Gas Bldg. 
CHICAGO 



REPRESENTATIVES 

L. F. McClernan 

1417 Ford Bldg. 

DETROIT 



L. D. Rockwell 

U.S. Express Bldg. 

NEW YORK 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



10 



SHELBY 



SEAMLESS 
STEEL 



TUBING 




■This photograph shows a remarkable coil of Shelby Seamless Steam Tubing turned out recently 
for La Cie de Gaz de Lachine, Lachine. 

The diameter of the coil is nearly seven feet, and the length about twelve feet. It is made up 
of twenty circular sections of tubing 3% inches in outside diameter, with 9 16 inch walls — a 
total of 400 feet of tubing. 

The seamless steel cylinder shown resting on the trestles is 9 feet long, 9^6 inches outside 
diameter, with walls 1% inches thick, and a capacity of 3,800 cubic inches. Test pressure 6 tons 
per square inch. 

We show this coil and cylinder because they give an idea of the out-of-the-ordinary work which 
we can turn out in Shelby Steel Tubing. Shelby Tubing can be 

Beat, Flanged, Expanded, Tapered, Upset, Spun, Case-hardened, Machined infinitely. Applied manifoldly. 

We are prepared to handle all kinds of special work in Seamless Steel Tubing, or to make Seam- 
less Steel Cylinders in any size or capacity. Write us about your requirements. We shall 
be glad to suggest ways and means of meeting them economically and to the best advantage. 

JOHN MILLEN & SON, Limited 

VANCOUVER 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Address all correspondence to 321 St. James Street, Montreal. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



20 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



"HARD SERVICE" (Portable) 




TYPE " DCoo 



are the solution of the problem, 
minimum cost. 



Electrically operated 

DRILLS s REAMERS 



Built in 6 sizes. Scope to 2. 



Are you operating to the best advantage in drilling large and 
heavy parts? You could no doubt save money and time on 
others by taking a machine to your work instead of the 
work to the machine. "Hard Service" Drills and Reamers 
Your ultimate Machines if you want maximum production at 



Write for descriptive matter, information and prices. 

the van DORN & DUTTON COMPANY 

CLEVELAND 

Canadian Representative: R. E. T. PRINGLE, Eastern Townships Bank Bldg., Montreal, Quebec. 



SOME of Our Specialties 

PNEUMATIC AND ELECTRIC TOOLS— "New Boyer" Riveters and Chippers, "Little Giant" Pneumatic Drills, 
Duntlcy Air Cooled Portable Electric Drills, Grinders, etc., manufactured by the Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company. 
AIR COMPRESSORS— "Franklin" Type, all styles and sizes. 
ANTI-RAIL CREEPERS— All types, absolutely prevent rails creeping. 
BUMPING POSTS— The "Gibraltar" Structural Steel. 
RAIL BENDERS— Q. & C. "Samson." 

LOCOMOTIVE AND CAR REPLACERS— "Fewings" Cast Steel. 
COUPLER KNUCKLES— "Gilman Brown" Emergency. 
JOURNAL BOXES— "McCord" Malleable Iron. 
PRIEST SNOW FLANGERS— Bring your trains in "On time." 
"AJAX" CAR VESTIBULE DIAPHRAGMS— Canvas, with steel reinforcement. 
PANTASOTE CURTAIN MATERIALS— Any style, latest design. 

FREIGHT CAR DOOR FIXTURES Security Side and End Door. Dunham Side end End Door. 
STEEL BACK BRAKE SHOES — Locomotive, tender, passenger and freight car equipment. 
MONKBRIDGE STAYBOLT IRON— Best Yorkshire, stands all tests. 
McKIM GASKETS — Copper covered, asbestos and rubber filled. 

GRAY'S CHIMNEYLESS LONGTIME BURNERS— None equal, ask us for sample. 
FORSYTH BUFFING DEVICE— The high capacity shock absorbing device. 
CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT STEEL— Maxwell "Deformed" Bar. 
H. R. RATCHET BRAKE LEVER— For all classes of equipment. 

If you would like catalogues or prices, write us, and we will forward same promptly and cheerfully on receipt 
of your request. 

The Holden Company, Limited 

42 York Street 354 St. James Street 29 U Portage Ave. 

TORONTO, Ont. MONTREAL, Que. WINNIPEG, Man. 

The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



21 



A Mighty- 
Trio 




Made by 



Trimont Mfg. Co. 

Roxbury, Mass. 



Send for Catalog 
No. 200 



U. S . Electric Drills and Grinders 

Are saving time and labor in every shop they are in — for drilling in metal they are 
superior to any kind of portable drill, cost 50% less to run than air drills. Attach 
to any lamp-socket to operate. 




3-SIZES 
3/16 inch, W.G.T. 6 lbs. 
^inch, W.G.T. 9 lbs. 
g inch, W.G.T. 1 2 lbs. 



4-SIZES 

J - i - i J and ii inch. 



I inch— 2 SPEED 
Speed, 400-750 R. P.M. 




All motors wound for 110 or 220 volts. Direct or alternating current. 

Write for Catalogue. 



Portable Radial Drill 
Full Universal 
2-sizes, 7/8 and ij inch. 



Montreal 



For sale by THE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., LTD. 

St. John, N.B. - Toronto - Winnipeg - Calgary 



Vancouver 



The United States Electrical Tool Co. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



■•>.-> 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Multiple 
Spindle 
Drills 



No 1 Drill— 9-in. Round Head 
6 : -in. Drills 



The No. 1 Drill illus- 
trated can be furnished 
to drill the following 
holes in brass, cast 
iron or steel, drilling to 
a 9 in. circular, or a 
9x12 in. rectangular or 
irregular layout: 

4 J-in. holes 

6 fi-in. 

8 i-in. 

10 Mn. 



We build machines for drill- 
ing motor bases, cylinders, 
crank cases and parts of 
similar character. 



WRITE US TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION 



MACHINE CO. 



23 N. Front St.. GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



No 

Hammer, 

Spanner 

or Wrench 

required 



THE 

RUSSELL 

Anti-Friction 




Roller 

Bearings 

eliminate 

friction 



DRILL 
CHUCK 



is easily adjusted by a simple turn of 
the wrist, and is remarkable for the 
tenacity with which it grips the drill. 
Positively holds straight shank drills 
without slipping. 

Send for catalogue 

Distributing Agents in Canada 

The General Supply Company of Canada 

Limited 
Ottawa, - - Canada 

MADE BY 

Russell Anti-Friction Drill Chuck Co. 

ELMIRA, N.Y. 







Riveting by Lightning 



NO RIVETS USED. 



You have heard of lightning melting a piece of 
metal. 

That is what's done in a Spot Welder only the 
lightning is tamed and harnessed. So tame that you 
can't feel it (only three to five volts), and harnessed 
to a machine that a boy or girl can operate with abso 
lute safety. And FAST well you have heard of 
"greased" lightning. That's the brand. 

One "Spot" will weld two piece's of No. 18 gauge 
sheet steel together tighter than two rivets. The 
same machine will weld No. 10 gauge or No. 28 gauge 
equally as well. 

Spot Welded —so called because the small point 
in the metal the size of a rivet is melted — fused to- 
gether at the spot where the copper dies touch the 
metal. 

No holes to punch no rivets to use — no projec- 
tions to raise no time wasted. 

Our new catalog tells about spot and butt welders, 
and its yours for the asking. 

No Lease. No Royalty. No License. 

The'Toledo" Electric Welder Co. 

CUMINSVILLE, CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



23 



Have you a Locker System in your Shop? 

"D.L." Standard 

METAL LOCKERS 

installed in your machine shop will, directly and 
indirectly, save you money. 

They are sanitary, and 
protect your workmen 
from risk of contagion. 

They are fireproof and 
fire retarding, and lower 
your insurance rates. 

They provide absolute 
security against petty 
theft, and promote order 
and system. 

They have specially well 
made doors and locking 
device, and each locker 
bears a distinctive num- 
ber with corresponding 
key. 

Unequalled for strength, 
durability and economy. 

Send to-day for catalogue contal ina all 
Information about '' D.L." Standard Metal 
Lockers and Material Cabinets. Our 
prices will greatly Interest you. 

Dennis Wire & Iron 
Works Co v Ltd. 




LONDON, 



CANADA 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



24 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



SHUTDOWNS PREVENTED 

or at any rate made of extremely rare occurence by using 



Write to-day 

for 

Details and 

Prices 



Goodhue Belts 



Guaranteed 

Reliable 

and 

Economical 






—the belts that STRETCH LESS by 15% to 25% than any other leather belts 
on the market. Think also what a saving "Goodhue" Belts mean in belting, you 
can't use the short lengths taken out every time slack is taken up. All unstretched 
parts are carefully excluded in the make-up of "Goodhue" Belts, which in point of 
satisfactory and lengthy service have no superiors anywhere. 

When "quality" is taken into account, "Goodhue" Belts will be found the 
cheapest on the market . 

According to conditions under which the belt has to run we recommend : — 

"EXTRA," "STANDARD" or "ACME WATERPROOF" 

J.L.Goodhue £& Co., Limited 

DANVILLE, P.Q. 



Why Buy Wood Pulleys When You Can Save Money ^By Purchasing 

"POSITIVE" COMBINATION PULLEYS? 



Waterproof 
Wood Rims 

Pressed Steel 
Arms 

Malleable Hubs 




Will transmit 
more power 

and consume 
less' power 

than any other 
pulley 



EVERY PULLEY GUARANTEED. 
Prompt shipments from stock. Write us for the opinions of users. 

The Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Limited 



11-13 Jarvis Street 



TORONTO, ONT. 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



25 



JUST A SUGGESTION 

of what we have to offer you, Mr. Buyer, in 
the way of prompt delivery. 

A stock of 10,000 to 15,000 finished pulleys 
up to 72 x 16 inch always on hand 

Immense bins of parts ready to assemble at 
a moment's notice. 

Thousands of pulleys stocked throughout the 
country with high class dealers. 



So complete 
and well equipped 
a factory that 
orders for specials 
and large sizes may 
be filled on two or 
three days' notice. 

Let us prove 
to you! the value 
ofl having ".what 
you wantTwhen 
you want_it." 



SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 

Oneida Steel Pulley Co. 

Oneida, N.Y. 




u/>e CYCLONE BELT 
AIR PROPELLER 

is known the wide world over for its HIGH EFFICI- 
ENCY and^firsticlass construction. The special 

feature of this fan 
is the blade, 
which is simple 
in design, but 
REMARKABLE IN 
OlirFUT.the latter 
being higher for 
power taken than 
any other known 
make. 

SUITABLE FOR 
ALL VENTI- 
LATING. COOL- 
ING AND DRY- 
ING PURPOS- 
ES. 
SEND OUR AGENTS YOUR ENQUIRIES AND MENTION NO. 128 

Matthews 6& Yates, Limited 

SWINTON, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

AGENTS FOR CANADA: 
BAIN & MITCHELL. Y.M.C.A. Building. Montreal. 
A \ 111') V .It JIlUN SUPPLY CO., Limited, 311 Eaderton Building. Winnipeg. 





Burn 

Cheap 

Fuel 

With the Sheldon Mechani- 
cal Induced Draft System 
you can cut the cost of fuel 
in half, by utilizing a cheap- 
er grade, or can secure bet- 
ter and almost smokeless 
combustion from the same 
grade of fuel that you are 
now using. 



Send for Catalogue 
No. 14 



SI1ELDONS LIMITED - GALT, ONTARIO 



Don't fail to mention "Can adian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



26 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



NOTICE 

THE 

SPLIT-BASE 

ITS NEW 



THE WATEROUS 

SPLIT-BASE PUMP 







PUMPS 

FOR EVERY 

PURPOSE! 

|BELT, ENGINE 

AND 
MOTOR DRIVEN 



The Water ou» Horizontal Pump shown herewith is the type 
most extensively used for all purposes, and for gen- 
eral work is the best pump on the market. It is 
very strong and solid. 

The pump has few parts to get out of order. It is put 

together to stay right and it does. The runner is of 
large diameter, of special wear proof material and 
runs comparatively slowly. The exceptionally heavy 
shaft is carried in a long bearing', lined with the best 
babbitt metal. The pulley is large, turned all over 
and perfectly balanced. The hub bearing is long, 
carries the runner without end play, and is furnished 
with a split bronze packing gland. 

The split-base is its special feature, permits the removal 
of the operating parts without disturbing pump 
foundation. 

The pump is built up in sizes up to 14 inch discharge opening. 
Pumps are always kept in stock and can be shipped 
immediately. For further information and general di- 
mensions 



Write for Booklet No. 200 

The Waterous Engine Works Co., Limited 

Brantford, Canada 




Have you STOPPED to con- 
sider why CANADA'S LARG- 
EST and BEST EQUIPPED 
POWER HOUSES are sup- 
plied with 

Goldie Corliss 



Steam Engines? 



The Reason is: — The installa- 
tion of these are superintended 
by mechanical engineers who 
will have nothing but the best 
running and most economical 
Engine. 



GOLDIE CORLISS STEAM ENGINES 

have clearly demonstrated the fact that they are Superior to all other Engines of the same type 
Ask us for Catalogues, Specifications and any other Information you may require. 

The Goldie £& McCulloch Co., Limited, Gait, Ont., Can. 

WESTERN BRANCH- 248 McDermott Ave.. Winnipeg. Man. QUEBEC— Ross & Greig, 412 St. James St., Montreal, Que. 
MARITIME PROVINCES 13-15 Dock St.. St. John. N.B. BRITISH COLUMBIA Robt. Hamilton & Co , Vancouver, B.C. 



/ lie advertiser uauid itke lu know where you saw Ins advertisement- — tell him. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



27 



THE JOHN INCUS COMPANY, Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



If you are requiring Feed Water Heaters, 
Condensers, Steel Storage and Mixing 
Tanks, send us your inquiries. Experience 
counts, and we have had fifty years' ex- 
perience in Boiler and Engine manufac- 
turing and to-day our products are the 
standard. 

14 STRACHAN AVENUE, TORONTO, CANADA 



Robb Corliss Engines 




Robb Engineering Co. 



Have the Armstrong-Corliss valve gear, 
which will operate at a higher speed 
than the ordinary releasing gear. 

This valve gear does not depend on 
springs or dash pots for closing, and 
runs without noise. 

The wearing parts of the valve gear are 
enclosed in a casing and run in oil so 
that friction is reduced to a minimum. 



AMHERST, N.S. 



LIMITED 



DISTRICT OFFICES 

Canadian Express Building, Montreal 
Traders Bank Building, Toronto 
Union Bank Building, Winnipeg 
Grain Exchange Building, Calgary ' 



R. W. Robb, Manager 
Wm. McKay. 

W. F. Porter, 

J. F. Porter, 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



28 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



More Power at Less Cost ! 

Here's a proposi- 
tion to diminish 
working costs that 
must surely appeal 
to YOU ! ' 

Will you investi- 
gate the merits of 
the 

WEBSTER 

Feedwater Heater, 
Purifier and Filter? 

It makes use of 
a 1 1 condensations 

and waste steam, 

and will positively 

rid your boiler of 

scale by removing 

a 1 1 scale-forming 

elements from your feedwater. Using pure water 

means getting every ounce of power out of your 

boiler with a smaller amount of fuel. 

Our descriptive literature has many points of 
interest for you ! Send for it TO-DAY. 

DARLING BROS., LIMITED 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 

Vancouver, B.C., Frank Darling. Agent 



1 




THE 



LANCASHIRE 
DYNAMO AND 
MOTOR CO., Ltd. 

152-4 Bay Street, Toronto 



Motors and 
Generators 

for 

all purposes 



J# 




1 



The Philadelphia Grease Cup! 



will not only save you up to 50 per cent, of the 
cost of any other lubricating system, but, be- 
en use compressed air is the feeding force, it is 
equally positive in action in whatever position 
placed. 

Pressure is always uniform to the last drop 
of grease, and the "Philadelphia" saves time 
and labor because it requires no attention. 

Here is the grease cup to increase the effici- 
ency of your plant while decreasing your ex- 
pense 

(live the PHILADELPHIA a thorough 
trial, Tt has proved an invariable winner 
tinder whatever conditions used. 

Write for prices and discounts. 



Peterborough Lubricating Mfg. Co., Ltd. ' 

PETERBOROUGH, ONT. 



U 




The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



29 



TIN 60c. M©¥YCTM3nr 




US IPHEPHCTIEP 




Air® C©m§F©m{k<B(i WWrl m B<BFl@m& C@nadlnfin@!3a 



IY STAMP F©E H¥? 



MAGNOLIA METAL 



Will sail rings around "Genuine" Babbitt at about half the cost per pound, and then save probably as much more in the 
reduction of frictional resistance, in longer wear, less fuel, less oil, less liability to squash or "shutdown" and less 
rebabbitting. 

Engineers using Magnolia can spend their evenings at home and read the papers during the day. 



Sounds LiKe Bragging, and It Is. 



We have a right to brag, for we merely reflect the enthusiasm and high opinion of Engineers and great scientists 
and governments and others in all parts of the world, and we don't believe in hiding our light under a bushel. 

Now is the time of times to test Magnolia on the bearings where you believe that only "Genuine" Babbitt 
will work. 

It is an erroneous idea that Magnolia is a soft bearing metal. Magnolia will withstand 19% greater 
pressure than "Genuine," and as we have frequently pointed out, it is frictional heat that causes squashing, to which 
"Genuine" is very susceptible and Magnolia exceptionally immune, because possessing the lowest co-efficient of friction 
of any known metal with all of its co-related virtues and economies. 

Please watch out for our ad., which will shortly appear, showing a remarkable test of Magnolia Metal by the 
United States Government, using 'WATER as a lubricant. It is an eye opener. 

■ PONT HESITA TE, ORDER MAGNOLIA METAL NOW 

SOLD BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE 



Special Offer— Practical Engineer Pocket Book 

containing 680 pages, treating on over 2000 Engineer- 
ing and Mechanical subjects brought up-to-date. We 
offer this valuable reference work at the very low price 
of 40c post paid. 

Address MONTREAL OFFICE. 



OR BY 



AGNOUA METAL CO. 



225 St. Ambroise St. 

NEW YORK 



Montreal 



CHICAGO 



You Can Adjust This Clutch to Carry Any Load 

thus eliminating all liability of overstrain or breakage of the 
machine operated. In the past eight years 




&f>e BERG 
BALANCED FRICTION CLUTCH PULLEY 



has been used with theutmost satisf actionon 
over a thousand machines of various kinds. 

It can be started as gradually as desired. 
Frictions are made of fibre — not wood, and 
the pulley is brass bushed. 

We guarantee each clutch to carry its 
rated capacity with ease. 



It will pay you to investigate this clutch 
as it Is a trouble-killer and power-saver 
wherever it Is installed. Write for cir- 
cular and prices. 



7he Berg Machinery Mfg. Co. 



Limited 



Bathurst and Niagara Sts. 



Toronto, Ont. 



We make Castings. Engines. Boilers. Tanks, and Sheet Metal Work of all kinds. 
Mining and Brick Machinery. 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



30 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Pj*ver Talk No. 3 



That New Power Plant 

Will be installed with an eye to getting the best results 
from every ton of coal. 

Your power transmission equipment should be bought 
with the same care. 

The difference between the cost of power at your engine 
or motor and at your machine averages from 20% to 70%. 

This is wasted in friction. 

Chapman Double Ball Bearings are guaranteed to save 
75 ",, of this shaft friction and 95% of lubrication over any- 
type of self oiling bearings. 

They are now installed in over 1,000 Canadian factories. 
Send us a rough sketch of your shafting layout and we 
will advise you as to the amount of power that can be 
saved and the cost of installing Ball Bearings. 

The Chapman Double Ball Bearing Co. of Canada, Limited 

347 SORAUREN AVENUE, TORONTO, CANADA 



AIR COMPRESSORS 



> "pHE illustration is of a 
* RAND Class "NE-I" 
Straight Line Belt-Driven Air 
Compressor. 

This is an economical, automatic, 
highspeed, self-contained machine, 
which represents the very latest de- 
velopment in small power-driven 
air-compressors. 

The excellence of design and construction 
of these small machines is unequalled. 
Every part is just as carefully manufactured 
as the largest type of Corliss Compressor, 
and the result is a machine of unusual 
quality. 






CANADIAN RAND CO., LIMITED 

COMMERCIAL UNION BUILDING, MONTREAL 

TORONTO, COBALT, WINNIPEG, LETHBRIDGE, ROSSLAND, VANCOUVER, HALIFAX 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell him. 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



31 



Renold Patent Silent Chains 

Hans Renold, Limited, Manchester, England, the Sole Mfrs. in the WORLD. 



Transmit at a high speed 
any power and do it as 
quietly as a belt with the 
certainty of gears. 

Being positive, effect 
a continuous saving of 
power. 

Write for 
particulars. 




(A Renold Silent Chain driving a mine hoist from a 150 H.P. Motor. Centers 6 ieet.) 



JONES 6& GLASSCO ■» MONTREAL 



STEEL CASTINGS 

By the TROPENAS CONVERTER PROCESS 

We beg to announce that owing to the growth of our steel foundry 
business we are giving up the manufacture of grey iron castings, and 
in future by specializing hope to give still better satisfaction. 

When new improvements at present under way are finished, we will 
have the most modern and best equipped steel foundry in Canada for 
the manufacture of steel castings up to 1,000 lbs. weight. 

Pattern Work 

Parker Foundry Company, Limited 



2,7 Tanstey St., 



MONTREAL 



Don't fail to mention "Canadian Machinery" in writing to advertisers. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



ColdlSaw Cutting Off Machine 




TATENTS PENDING 



A Dividend Payer 

THINK how many jobs you could do at REDUCED COST, with 
one of our cold saws. Many jobs are done on a Shaper, Slotter, 
Milling Machine or with a Hack Saw that could be done much more 
economically on one of these handy machines, leaving the other tools 
for the work they are particularly adapted for. 

These Cold Saws can be fitted up with clamps for doing a great 
variety of work not only for general Machine Shops, but also Structural 
Shops; they will saw anything within the capacity of the saw. 

They are of substantial construction, designed to^ withstand the 
severe strains developed when cutting through metal with a saw blade 
driven by powerful gearing. 



Shall We Send You Catalogue? 



The Canadian Fairbanks Company, Limited 

Fairbanks Scales. — Fairbanks-Morse Gas Engines.— Safes and^Vaults. 

Montreal Toronto St. John, N.B. Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary Vancouver 



The advertiser would like to know where you saw his advertisement — tell hintx 







Making a Double Barreled 
Shot Gun 



By B. A. C. 



Pig. 1 Finished Gun, Showing Median ism. 



The Shotgun is Such a Common Article That Far Stop to Consider How it is Manufac- 
tured. Gun-making has Become Such an Important Brandt of Machine Shop Practice 
That There are in Use Many Special Machines to Facilitate Production, Not to Mention 
the Hundreds of Jigs for the More Expedition* and Rapid Handling of the Parts. The 
Only Shot-gun Factory in Canada, the Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont., is a 
Thoroughly Up-to-date Example of What is Being Done in This Special Line of Activity, 
the Principals and Operators in the Factory Having Spent Year* Developing Their 
Knowledge of This Special Line. 



'TMIE writer, when passing through 
*■ the plant of the Tobin Arms Mfg. 
Co., Woodstock, was impressed with the 
multiplicity of operations necessary to 
produce even the seemingly most insig- 
nificant parts of a shot gun. To the 
casual observer, there is not much to a 
gun, but, if examined closely, it will be 
observed that quite a large number of 
parts enter into their make-up, neces- 
sitated largely by the more or less auto- 
matic action of the firearm, and also 
from the compact construction essential 
to a good gun. 

This latter feature makes machining 
of the parts a considerable job, for from 
this compactness, every available space 
must be utilized, making many of the 
parts of unusual mechanical construc- 
tion. Numerous distinct operations are 
required in most cases. 

The frame of the gun shown at A, Fig. 
3, affords a good example, for this part 
in itself requires 57 separate and dis- 
tinct operations. Of course, this is the 
main part of the gun, and on it both 
figuratively and literally, the rest of the 
gun hinges. As with most of the other 
irregular parts, the frame is drop forged 
steel, and in the finishing, like nearly 
all the parts, the miller plays a very 
prominent part, being the principal ma- 
chine employed. 

A review of a few of the principal op- 
erations on the frame would be of in- 
terest in showing how a job like this 
would be produced. The first three op- 
erations are on the power miller, finish- 
ing up the two sides and back thereby 
squaring the piece for further opera- 
tions. The next two operations are on 
what is called the "water table" at B 
and C. The two operations are neces- 
sary—too much for one cut. The first 
removes the flat face B, and the second, 
the perpendicular face C. Following 
this is a drilling and reaming operation 
on the joint pin hole D. The tang E 



receives the next attention being finish- 
ed in the power miller under, above, 
and on the two sides in four successive 
operations. Next comes another power 
miller operation on the round joint end, 
which must of necessity be very accur- 
ate, of a true circular form. This is 
done by a formed miller, producing the 
work very rapidly. In order comes the 
lug cut F on the miller, which is the 
cut in the frame to hold the lug of the 
barrel. In succession follow the dril- 
ling, reaming, and slotting of the trip 
hole, finishing the recess G on each side 
in several operations by the hand mil- 



was the expeditious manner in svhich 
they could be produced naturally. To 
make this possible, jigs, formed tools 
and milling cutters without number, are 
employed, many of them very intricate 
in form, but designed with the idea of 
simplicity of operation in view. 

The fore end iron shown at H, Fig. 3, 
is another piece with a number of oper- 
ations, 23 in all, of which the principal 
are the top face cut, two side cuts, 
wood cut, joint cut, all done on the 
the miller, and the drilling and broach- 
ing operations. The trigger plate, 
shown at A, Fig. 2, also has a number 




Fig. - — Component Parts of a Shotgun in Various Stages of Manufacture. 



ler, and the profiling of the lock cut, in 
the interior of the frame by the profiler. 
Between these various operations men- 
tioned are many minor ones, principally 
drilling, slotting and broaching. 

In all these varied operations, the 
point that stood out most prominently, 



of different operations, the principal 
ones being on the hand miller. There 
are 19 in all. The upper cut shows the 
plate in its drop forged state, and the 
lower one, finished. B shows the frame 
and mechanism assembled, and C, the 
fore end iron in different stages of com- 



134 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



pletion The side vie* is given in Fig. 

3. D shows the right and left trigger, 
in the different states ol finish ; E is the 
same for the lock plate, and F, the 
the trigger guard. For the latter it 
will be noticed that it is drop-forged in 
the Hat state and then bent to Shape. 
G shows the various stages of comple- 
tion of the cartridge ejector ; 11, the 

and tefl rear . l. the finished and 
unfinished top lever, mote the way it 
is drop-forged) ; .1, the bolt , K, the 
cam lock and cocking cam in their var- 
and also assembled ; L, 
the hammer . and M. the main spring, 

how it is produced) 
! shows how the two barrels are 
united. Instead of being a solid, one 
piece forging, each barrel is finished to 
a certain point separately, and the two 
dovetailed together as shown, and braz- 




,,,,1 otbei Parts of the Guu. 

ed. This makes a very solid union, as 
the separting strain is not very great 
After thus uniting, the final finish is 
given to the interior of the barrel in a 
special machine, where the finishing 
reamer shown in Fig. 5 is employed. It 
removes from .010 to .012 ins. in all, 
and must of necessity operate \cry 
slowly to prevent chatter, as the cutt- 
ing edge presented is the whole interior 
iength of the barrel. As shown the 
reamer consists of a square steel bar, 
three corners of which are dulled, and 




■ si .if Barrel. 

the fourth with a sharp edge, like a 
scraper. A shim of wood along one side 
(the proper side is indicated) makes the 
reamer fit the barrel snugly. Each op- 
eration removes but a very slight sur- 
face, and to change the size to remove 
more each time, very thin strips of 
tissue paper are introduced between the 
wood shim and cutting bar, increasing 
the size slightly. The cuts must he 



\er> small to obviate the befoce i -Bu- 
ttoned danger of chattering, as, once a 
chatter-groove is made, it is practically 
impossible to remove. 

Various other special machines and 
tools are employed reflecting credit on 
F. M. Tobin, vice-president of the :uin- 

,WWP .5HIW1 



COYTiNft e^f? 



Pigf. 5 -Finishing Reamer. 

pany, and A. A. Lottery, superin.cn- 
dant, who installed the plant. It is due 
to these two men and parVceU; ly to 
the former, that there is at ptesent a 
modern and efficient shot gun factory in 
Canada. 



WIRE GAUGES SHOULD BE STAN- 
DARIZED. 

A correspondent in "Scientific Am- 
erican" has called attention to the fact 
that there are some six or eight differ- 
en1 gauges in use by the wire and sheet 
mills of the United States. There is 
often a difference of two sizes in the 
gauges, and a mistake in using the 
wrong gauge often results in a great 
deal of expense to one party or the 
other. If merely the size and not the 
gauge is given with an order, the mill 
must write hack to ascertain the gauge, 
and much valuable time is lost. The 
writer suggests that either the manufac- 
turers themselves should get together 
and decide on some one gauge, or the 
Government should lake action in the 
matter. 



NEW MACHINERY HALL. 

An architect's drawing of the new 
machinery building for the Ottawa Ex- 
hibition Grounds, lias been prepared. 
The building was designed by Mr. W. E. 
Xoffke. architect. It will stand near 
where the old machinery hall is located, 
occupying the present roadway in front 
of that building. The lagoon in the ex- 
hibition grounds is to be filled up and 
only two small ponds with fountains in 
them will be left in front of the new- 
building. The building will be 280 feet 
Ion? and 140 feet wide. It is Japanese 
in architecture. The Btructure will have 
a steel frame and (lie outside will be of 
brick, built with Flemish bond. The 
trimmings ami columns will be of con 
crete and the roof of red tile. 

At the main entrance to the building 
will 1>.' Japanese towers, which will be 

illuminated with electric lipids, forming 
two towers of light on either side of the 
doorway. There are also two Japanese 
towers on the roof also to be illuminat- 
ed. 



The columns in front and the gables 
will be treated in the best examples of 
tailv Japanese architecture. The floor 
will be of concrete and the inside walls 
treated in brick. 

The <anal runs at the rear of the 
building, which will be placed forward 
of the old balding in order that the pro- 
posed route of the driveway may not be 
interrupted along the canal at this point. 



BOLTS 



SECTIONAL AREA UNI- 
FOMITY. 

By A. E. B. 



Bolts that are subject to repeated 
shock and stress, those belonging to an 
engine connecting rod for example, give 
much more satisfactory service if the 
body is reduced in diameter to give an 
area corresponding to that of the bot- 
tom of the thread, or if a hole is drill- 
ed out to attain the same end. 

With each shock there occurs a slight 
temporary elongation concentrated for 
the most part at the smallest diameter 
or area, i.e., the bottom of the thread 
between the nut and bolt body, Fig. 1. 

The continuance of this condition 
leads to a crystallizing process being 
set up in the material, and ultimate 
fracture of the bolt, after it may be a 



CZ 



Fig. 1. 



•+*/■/ 



#Wtf# MH W 



XI 



Fig. 






Fig. 3. 

brief service, irrespective of safe work- 
ing calculation of sectional area. 

By reducing the area of the bolt body 
until it is equal to the area under the 
thread, the temporary elongation or 
stretching is distributed over a greater 
length and naturally the strain is less 
per particle of metal than otherwise. 

Fig. 2 illustrates the bolt with the 
body diameter reduced, and Fig. 3 the 
bolt with the hole drilled into it. Both 
of these methods are in common use and 
each gives highly satisfactory results. 

Preference is sometimes given to the 
method indicated by Fig. 3, for the 
reason that as it does not decrease the 
outer diameter, the twisting or tor- 
sional strength of the bolt is not im- 
paired. 

It is the practice in many cases to 
have this reduction of bolt area par- 
ticularly referred to in specifications, 
and its more frequent adoption in gen- 
eral practice would be conducive to im- 
munitv from breakdown. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co.'s "Welfare" Department 

By Blackroclc 

.1 Growing Tendency is Being Manifested Among Large Employers of Labor in the Direc- 
tum of Improved Social Conditions for Then- Employees. Tlie Movement is Ove Which 
Naturally Meets With the Approval and Heart// Co-operation of the Latter, and While 
Only -last in its Infancy and Experimental Stage, Gives Promise of Far-reaching Results 
in Producing Amicable Relations Between Capital and, Labor. 



npHE McClary "welfare" department 
*■ was organized about a year ago on 
Ihe initiative of the company, which 
step ranks them among the pioneers in 
the opening up of this field of factory 
social extension and development. "Wel- 
fare" as applied to employes is inter- 
preted to mean "anything done by an 
employer for the benefit of his employes, 
which he is not compelled by law or ex- 
<1 by custom to do." 

Features of the "Work. 

At the foundry plant in the east end 
of the city (London, Ont.) is to be 
found a perfectly equipped emergency 
hospital, and at their wares plant in the 
centre of the city is to be found a simi- 
larly equipped institution. 

A graduate nurse is employed by the 
department and devotes her whole time 
to the cause. She gives advice as to 
the sanitary conditions existing through- 
out the plants, gives first aid assis- 
tance in case of accidents, dresses the 
wounds of such persons until completely 
recovered, and visits employes at their 
homes in sickness. 

During the year just closed the nurse 
(Mrs. Reynolds), attended 26 accidents, 
made 619 dressings, and paid 240 sick- 
ness visits. In addition to the nurse, 
attendance and service, a doctor visits 
the factories daily at the noon hour. 

Lunch Room, Library, etc. 
At each plant there is a cafe under the 
care of an experienced chef. Here whole- 
some food is supplied at cost to all 
who care to avail themselves of it. A 
daily average of 300 lunches are served, 



and separate lunch and rest rooms are 
provided for girls. 

In winter, games, entertainments and 
lectures are provided at the noon hour, 
while in summer outdoor recreation in 



McCLARYS 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

^f This List must be placed in the box 
in each department by ten o'clock 
each morning, in order that the per- 
son in charge will have ample time 
for preparation. 

•I Mark what you want, total the 
amount, sign your name and date. 

BILL OF FARE 

FRUIT IN SEASON 
SOUP 

SANDWICHES 
EGG SANDWICHES 
PORK AND BEANS - 
BANANAS - 
TEA 

COFFEE 
MILK 
HOT OXO 

BREAD AND BUTTER 
PIE 
HOT WATER 



TOTAL 



Date 

N .me 



the form of tennis and baseball are the 
features. 

Each plant is equipped with a library, 
supplemented by loans of books from the 
public library of the city. . A fee of one 
cent per week is charged for the loan of 
a book, which fee is put into a new 
book purchase fund. 

Fig. 1 is a view of the emergency hos- 



pital; Fig. 2 that of the library, each 
being intensely realistic of its particular 
purpose. The library boasts 633 volum- 
es on its bookshelf. 

Report of the Work. 

The annual general meeting of the wel- 
fare department was held on Monday 
evening, 6th February, at which gratify- 
ing reports of the previous year's work 
were presented, and office bearers for 
the ensuing year appointed. 

Col. W. M. Gartshore, vice-president 
of the company, and J. K. H. Pope, 
secretary, are chairman and vice-chair- 
man of the welfare executive respective- 
ly, the other members being drawn from 
the various departments. 

A striking phase of the work is the 
enthusiasm displayed by Col. Gartshore 
and pride taken by him in what has 
been already achieved, as evidenced in 
his availing himself of the daily lunch 
when opportunity offers. 

A Progressive Ideal. 

Effort of this nature is progressive if 
successful, in that one feature leads to 
another; this being so, additional ground 
is sure to. be broken during this second 
year of institution. Too much has not 
been attempted to begin with, just suffi- 
cient as it were to prove it to have 
been worth while. 

Work such as we have described is not 
in any sense charitable, its essence is 
not the giving of something for noth- 
ing ; it is rather an educative, elevating 
and humanitarian purpose, having in 
view the cultivation of a spirit of help- 





Fig. 1 — Emergency Hospital, McClary Mfg. Co.. London. 



Fig. 



-Library, McClary Mfg. Co., London. 



66 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



tul, thrifty and honest man ami woman- 
hood. 

We look for the example of the Wc 
Clan "welfare" department being imi- 
tated in other manufacturing centres of 
the Dominion, and it is not too much to 
i that as the scheme develops, there 
may at lea.-t he provincial executive 
hoards who will meet to discuss and 
further this co-operative movement of 
capital and labor. 

The McClary Booster Club. 

The McClary booster club is really an 
offspring of the welfare scheme, and 
exists to provide healthful amusement 
and entertainment on stated occasions 
to the employes and public. The meet- 
ings are held in the company's large 
dining hall, and consist of smoking con- 
certs, illustrated lectures, dance and 
euchre parties. 

George Moll, chief engineer of the 
wares plant, is president, and as in the 
case of Col. Gartshore and the "wel- 
fare" scheme, not a little of the boost- 
er club's success is due to him. The ad- 
mission to the meetings is restricted to 
10 cents, an amount entirely dispropor- 
tionate to the quality of entertainment 
usually given. 

"The Free Press," London daily, has 
donated a trophy to be awarded the so- 
ciety which has done or is doing most 
for the city's welfare. The booster club 
is entered, and high hopes are entertain- 
ed that "McClary's" will be the judges' 
selection. 

This article has featured at some 
length an excellent work that is being 
done by the co-operation of employer 
and employe, and we hope to continue 
the series by describing from time to 
time other concerns engaged in a like 
worthy compact. 



DIE CASTING. 
/"\N"E of the most successful of the 
^"^ modern methods of manufacture and 
one which has created considerab'e in- 
terest of late, :s that comnumv krov n 
as diecasting. The Frankli.i process was 
originated about eighteen years ago by 
the H. H. Franklin Mfg. Co., Syracuse, 
XV. In the Franklin process steel d'es 
are used in the place of sand moulds and 
into these dies the molten metal is 
forced under pressure, by means of es- 
pecially designed machines. This re- 
sults in smoothly finished castings ac- 
curate to the thousandths of an inch and 
with holes, slots, lugs, large threads 
and engraving accurately located. In 
fact the accuracy obtained by this me- 
thod of manufacture is in many cases 
greater than can be secured by machin- 
ing. Tin, zinc and lead based alloys 
are most commonly used, the normal 
strength being about that of cast iron, 
but the castings may be further streng- 
thened by the inserting of brass or steel 
stampings, pins, etc., in the process of 



easting, wherever special toughness is re- 
quired. In general, die castings range 
from 1-1 n of an ounce to 4 lbs. in 
weight. 

The extent to which the process has 
gained favor can be seen by the fact 
that 01,000 Franklin die castings were 
used in the construction of the 1910 
census tabulating machines, used by the 
U.S. Government. The automobile in- 
dustry has also found die castings of 
great advantage; engine bearings, oil 
and water pump, timer and magneto 
parts are produced chiefly by this pro- 
cess. Small gears, type wheels, tele- 
phone, electric and vending machine 
parts lend themselves readily to die 
casting. Many parts which if produced 
by the usual machine methods would 



the United States where the quantity of 
duplicate parts used is much greater, 
but many of the Canadian manufacturers 
are beginning, to realize the benefit re- 
sulting from their use in even moderate 

quantities. 

SHEELITE. 
Sheelite, one of the minerals con- 
taining tungsten, has been discovered in 
Halifax County. Nova Scotia. It is of 
no known use in itself, excepting as an 
ore from which tungsten may be extract- 
ed. The mineral is chemically a tung- 
state of calcium. As an ingredient in 
the chemical side of steel making, it is 
quite important. At present the world's 
animal output, coming mostly from 
Sweden, is placed at 4,000 tons. If pres- 
ent indications are correct, the recent 




Parte Cast by the Franklin Process and used by the U. S. Government in the Construc- 
tion 1 of the 1010 Census Tabulating Machines. 



have to be made up in sections and as- 
sembled may be die cast as a unit. In 
such cases the saving is especially no- 
ticeable. 

The steel dies used in the construction 
of die casting must of necessity be very 
accurate in order to secure the desired 
results, and none but the most skillful 
workmen can be employed in their manu- 
facture. As a result of the die cost, die 
castings are at present better known in 



discovery in Nova Scotia will not only 
yield sufficient for the steel plant in the 
province, but will have an effect on the 
markets of the world. The ore is report- 
ed to yield GO per cent, of tungsten acid 
to the ton of sheelite. At present 25 
men are at work on the preliminary ex- 
periments. Hiram Donkin, deputy com- 
missioner of mines, Halifax. Nova 
Scotia, will, give interested parties all 
iea son able information. 



Pneumatic Appliances at theG.T.R. Car Shops, London, Ont. 

By Halyard 

The Opportunity for the Introduction and Development of Methods and Devices Toward 
Quicker, Less Laborious and More Economical Output, Exists to a Lesser or Greater Ex- 
tent in Every Manufacturing and Repair Plant. We are Not Assuming Too Much in 
Stating that Possibly Those Plants Devoted Entirely to Repairs and Renewals Give Wider 
and More Effective Scope to Inventive Genius Than do Others of New Production Only, 
in That "Stern Necessity, the Mother of Invention," Demands the Exercise of the High- 
est Ingenuity and is Unsatisfied With Less. 



OplIE sketches and description of the 
appliances which form the subject of 
this brief article were gathered in the 
course of a few hours' sojourn in the 
G. T. R. car shops, London, Ont., and 
while perhaps in no sense displaying 
hitherto unknown features, and being 
peculiarly adaptable to the special char- 
acter and necessities of the work there, 
the great bulk of our readers will we 
arc sure be interested, and modified ar- 
rangements of some or all of the appli- 
ances described, will possibly find adap- 
tation by them in new fields. 

It is to be borne in mind that these 
various appliances are in no sense stand- 
aid, nor is it intended they be adhered 
to strictly in arrangement of detail by 
those interested to the extent of adopt- 
ing them. The aim is rather to show 
in a general way a few of the uses made, 
as ideas developed in a particular shop 
piped with compressed air for other and 
whal might be termed more important 
and primary purposes. That being so, 
modifications, improvements and entire 
change of design will in all probability 
suggest themselves to many, and new 
appliances arise from the cue given. 

As hinted in the preamble, repair and 
renewal shops are prolific of inventive 
genius. Break-downs and smash-ups 
necessitate most always rush putting-to- 



Many methods and devices employed 
on such occasions are carelessly and 
thoughtlessly lost track of daily, and 
the profession is the poorer for it. An 
insufficient realization of their intrinsic 
worth by those giving them conception 




Fig. 1 — Draught Timber Placer Jack. 

and an all-absorbing desire on the part 
of the administration to get things going 
again, combine to bring about the want 
of record referred to. 

We would like to digress a moment 
here and say that methods used by a 
mechanic to produce a piece of work of 
super quality, most economically, 
when made a regular practice of, are 
devices worthy of a place in the columns 
of this journal, and while lightly thought 



plied in practice. This is a point worthy 
the serious consideration of all engaged 
in the mechanical arts. Further, pub- 
licity given your methods and devices 
while admittedly helping the other fel- 
low along, ultimately helps you, as he 
too has something to give. 

The result of this distribution of ideas 
spells progress, progress leads to per- 
fection, comfort and comparative afflu- 
ence of the vast majority, and your duty 
lies that way. 

Portable Draught Timber Placer Jack. 

Fig. 1 represents the portable draught 
timber placer jack, and as its qualifica- 
tion implies, is used for running in un- 
derneath the cars, pushing the draft 
timber into place and holding it there 
until it is bolted up. The air cylinder 
is 5 inches diameter, the trolley wheels 
8 inch diameter, 15 inch centres and the 
extreme width of truck 20 inches. The 
cylinder may be either a casting with 
upper head bolted or screwed on, or 
a piece of heavy wrought iron pipe bored 
out, with both heads screwed on. The 
lower head is bolted to a steel plate 
base which in turn is attached to the 
trolley wheel axles. On top of the pis- 
ton rod a steel plate, 8 inches by 18 
inches, is attached for the purpose of 
carrying the draught timber. 




Fig. 2— Car-lifting Jack. 



Fig. :i — Door Section Lifting Apparatus. 



rights again, to attain which requires of and considered unimportant by the • Car Lifting Jack. 
keen discernment of the right and best user, from a publicity standpoint, show Fig. 2 is representative of the car- 
thing to do and the most helpful and themselves otherwise in the persistency lifting jack, and is necessarily heavier 
often improvised equipment to do it. with which they are adhered to and ap- and more powerful than the other. The 



68 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



cylinder diameter is 10 Laches, and its 
purpose the bearing of a part in lift- 
ing empty freight cars oil" the trucks. 
It- base rests on the ground when in ac- 
tion, ami for convenience in moving it 
around one pair of wheels and a heavj 
shaft complete the transportation facil- 
ities. 

Door Section Lifting Apparatus. 

is an arrangement peculiarly 




-Air Brake Hose Clasping Device. 

adaptable to railroad and street car 
shops. The door section lifting appar- 
atus permits of the complete wheels and 
axles, trucks for that matter of it. be- 
ing let out or taken into the shop with- 



The cylinder diameter in this case is 
made large enough together with the 
pressure to carry up the door section 
required, and the piston stroke long 
enough to suit the height of lift. 

The operating Lever to the right of the 
-ketch enables I he attendant to mani- 
pulate the aparatus with the greatest of 
case. The lever actuates a 3-way cock 
allowing air admission to lift the piston, 
air shut-off to hold it and the door in 
position, as long as necessary, and air 
u lease to allow the door to close again. 
The cylinder details in this, as in the 
others described, may be all castings 
or part wrought iron pipe and part cast- 
ings. 

Air Brake Hose-Nipple and Coupler 
Inserter. 

Fig. 4, the air brake hose nipple and 
coupler inserter, consists of a vertical 
acting air cylinder which clamps the 
standard length of hose, and the horizon- 
tal air cylinder with the nipple on its 
piston rod, which pushes the nipple into 
place, thereafter sliding the vertical cyl- 
inder and clamp endways toward the 
die block in which is laid the coupler. 
The horizontal movement pushes the 
hose onto the coupler. 

The cylinders are in each case about 
(> inches diameter, the vertical cylinder 
and standard being attached to the low- 
er half clamp which in turn slides on 
four slot hole guide studs inserted in 
[date attached to an ordinary vice bench. 
Air admission and release is applicable 
to both ends of each cylinder. 
Air Brake Hose Clasp. 

Fig. f> represents the air brake hose 
clasp attached to the end of the bench 



each half of the lower end of the 
squeezers is attached to permit of oscil- 
lation. From these centres light spiral 
springs are carried to and on opposite 
sides of their respective squeezer arms. 
These springs admit of the jaw grip be- 
ing released when the air is released, 
and prevent a clasped downward pull 
when the piston descends. 

The sketch otherwise is self explanat- 
ory and need not be dwelt upon. The 
advantage of the apparatus is that the 
clasp or hand flanges are closed up, ad- 
mit! ing of the bolt being inserted and 
the nut tightened up by hand. A span- 
ner to tighten the nut is unnecessary, 
because although only applied by hand, 
the slight reactionary spring due to the 
withdrawal of the jaw grip locks the 
nut tight. 

The saving of labor in the equipment 
of air brake hose by the sketch arrange- 
ments, Fig. 4 and 5, is 100 per cent, 
gain in economical production, and Ave 
should say were it possible to compute, 
an equivalent gain and comfort of oper- 
ator. 

Employes' Welfare. 

In a near future issue of Canadian 
Machinery we hope to describe the ar- 
rangements made for the welfare of the 
employes in the G. T. R. car shops, Lon- 
don, Ont., believing also that these 
will be found of much interest to all 
our readers. 

Much of the development and adapta- 
tion of suitable labor saving equipment 
as also the initiation and 

successful outcome of the em- 
ployes' industrial and social wel- 
fare scheme is due to efforts of Mr. 




I An- Brake Hose-nipple mid Coupler Inserting Apparatus 



out the necessity of opening the whole and adjacent to the nipple and coup]- Thos. A. Treleaven, master car build- 
door in cold and stormy weather, ing inserter. It consists of the air cyl- er, to whom we are indebted for the 
a proceeding which is more or less Loder, piston and piston rod, the latter opportunity of acquiring the foregoing 
clumsy and slow. with ., ,;,,, to opposite sides of which information. 



Twist Drill and Other Internal Cutting Tool Practice 

Modern Shop Practice has Developed Various Types of Twist Drills, Reamers, Counter- 
bores, etc., Greatly Increasing the Capacity of the Machines Using These Small Tools. 
The Breakage of Tangs Formerly Caused a Great Loss, But This has Now Bon Elimin- 
ated by Modern Methods. 



/"\ME of the most common small tools 
^"^ in the machine shop is the twist 
drill, and it is probably the most abas- 
ed. When a young fellow begins work 
in a machine shop, either as an appren- 
tice or as a machine hand, the first work 
is usually drilling. He is led over to 
the drill, given a jig and a drill and 
told to "drill these." 



Fig. 1— Hollow Drill. 

What the young chap does not know 
about drilling and shop methods would 
fill volumes. In the ordinary Canadian 
shop there is no central tool room, and 
the young chap is strictly "up against 
it." It is at this stage that the young 
fellow learns many things about drill- 
ing that he must "unlearn" later. 

When the writer entered the machine 
shop he was given the job of milling tie 
pins for three months. For this he 
received fifty cents per day. About 
that time there was a call for volun- 
teers for the Halifax garrison and it 
made a number of vacancies in our own 
shop. The writer was given the task of 
drilling malleable guards at seven cents 



per hundred, and malleable rings at 
twenty and twenty-live cents, and it 
was understood that he could make $1 
to $1.25 per day. At the same time an- 
other apprentice was given the job of 
drilling pins. He had an old drill situ- 
ated near mine with a big lever and a 
sliding table instead of the spindle and 
sleeve type, but made a dollar a day 
drilling pins at from five to ten cents 
per hundred. 

We were located away from the rest 
of the shop and with the exception of 
rough emerys for grinding the burrs 
off the gray iron and malleable castings, 
there were no tool grinders within three 
or four hundred feet. It meant a big 



centre and succeeded in making a u I 

job out of one that had formerly been 
looked upon as one of the worst in the 
shop. 





Fig. 2— An Oil Drill in Use. 

loss to us to go down there every time 
we wanted to sharpen a 9-64, a 3-16 
or a 7-32 inch drill as the case might be. 
We solved the difficulty by filing off 
the side of an emerv wheel close to the 



Fig. 3— Shell Drill. 

Since that time the writer has been in- 
terested in the progress of drilling. 
Some data which would have been valu- 
able in the old shop days, has been col- 
lected and some extracts from the pages 
of the diary are here given. 

Some Types of Drills. 
The twist drill of standard form is 
made with two lips and two grooves, 
which either make a constant angle with 
the axis or one which increases gradu- 
ally from the point upwards. The in- 
creased twist is given in order to coun- 
teract the thickening of the web from 
point to shank, imparted to resist the 

Table of Drill Feeds 




fig. 5 




FIG. 6 



=1 


Inches of Feed per Minute at Cutting Speed of 


a 


30 Feet-Steel 


35 Feet-Iron 


60 Feet— Brass 


1 

5 


Rev. per 
Minute 


Feed .004 


-.007 


Rev. per 
Minute 


.004-007 


Rev. per 
Minute 


.004-.007 

per Revolution 


A 


1834 


7-33 


12.83 


2140 


8.56 


14.97 


3668 


14.66 


2576 


J 


917 


3.66 


6.41 


1070 


4.28 


7-49 


1834 


7-33 


12.83 


1% 


611 


2.44 


4.27 


713 


2.85 


4-99 


1222 


4.88 


8.58 


i 


458 
367 


1.83 


3.20 


535 


2.14 
.007 


3-74 


917 


3.66 


6.44 




Feed .007 


.015 


•015 




.007 


•015 


i\ 


2-57 


5-5 


428 


3 


6.42 


733 


5-14 


11 


i 


306 


2.14 


4.6 


357 


2-5 


5-35 


611 


4.28 


9.2 


ik 


262 


1.83 


3-9 


306 


2.14 


4-58 


524 


3.66 


7.8 


i 


229 


1.60 


3-43 


268 


1.87 


4- 


459 


3.20 


6.86 


I 


184 


1.28 


2-75 


214 


1.50 


3-21 


367 


2-57 


5-5 


* 


153 


1.07 


2-3 


178 


1 25 


2.67 


306 


2.14 


4.6 


i 


131 


.91 


i-95 


153 


1.07 


2.29 


262 


1.88 


3-93 




"5 


.80 


1. 71 


134 


•93 


2 


229 


1.60 


3-43 


i* 


102 


•7i 


i-S3 


119 


•83 


1.79 


204 


i-43 


3.06 




91.8 


.64 


i-37 


107 


•75 


1.61 


183 


1.28 


2-75 


H 


83-3 


•58 


1-25 


97.2 


.68 


i-45 


167 


1. 17 


2-51 


ii 


76-3 


■53 


115 


89.2 


.62 


1.38 


153 


1.07 


2-3 


*i 


7°-5 


•49 


1.05 


82.2 


•57 


1-23 


141 


•99 


2. 11 


H 


05-5 


•45 


•97 


76.4 


•53 


ii5 


131 


•94 


1.96 


ii 


61. 1 


.42 


•92 


71-3 


•5° 


1.07 


122 


•85 


1.81 


2 


57-3 


.40 


•85 


66.9 


.46 


1. 


"5 


.80 


i-73 


2* 


Si 


•36 


•7i 


59-4 


.41 


•89 


102 


• 7i 


i-53 


2i 


45-8 


•32 


.68 


53-5 


•37 


.80 


91.7 


.64 


i-37 


2* 


4i-7 


.29 


• .62 


48.6 


•34 


•73 


83-4 


,58 


1. 21 


3 


38.2 


•27 


•57 


44.6 


•3i 


.67 


76.4 


•53 


115 



Pig. 10 Table of Drill Feeds 



70 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



tortiona] stress to which the drill is snb- 
jeeted. 

A centre drill is a short twist drill 
used for centring shafts before facing 
and turning. Sometimes a combined 
drill with a t>i> degree taper is used to 
drill the shaft and countersink it at 
the same time, thus avoiding two opera- 
tions. 

Hollow Drills. 

1 shows a hollow drill used for 
drilling long holes such as lathe and 




n— Driving Broken Tans Drill. 

drill spindles. The shank can he thread- 
ed and tilled to a metal tube of a length 
- ;t the work. 

Fig. 2 l- another type used when the 
work revolves and the drill remains sta- 
tionary. The oil cup is connected to the 
oil pump, forcing out the chips and 
keeping the point cool by a steady 
-t n-aiu. 

A shell drill is shown in Fig. 3. It 
i- used for reaming out holes after a 
standard drill or cored holes. The ar- 
bor i- the same for several sizes, so that 
■ ■-t ..:' -hell drills is comparatively 
small. 

A similar method is used so as to ob- 
tain t!ic henefits of high speed steel 
at low cost. I 'rill tips are made with 
a -mall -hank of about :; i inch which is 







l_- <s> 



12 -Preventing Tang Breakage. 

ided. This size i- adopted as stand- 
ard lor the shop and any size drill tits 
- tank which i- tapped to suit. The 

i- followed tor reamers. 

Sharpening Drills. 
With a drill the hole may he cut 
'•drive" tit or much larger than the 
drill. A user of drill- should therefore 
In- familiar with the manner of grind- 
ing a drill to cut tin- right size with as 
little power a- possible. To cut i ■ i <_r 1 1 1 

the right Bize the lip- DIUSt lie exactly 

the Bame length and the same angle. 

J i- a gauge which gives the li|i 

edge angle of .">() degrees and at the 
time assists in getting the true 

I _ 5 is a gauge which show- how to 
get both lips alike, hut does not give 
the angle. 



In Km. (i the drill has been relieved 
back of the cutting edge, making it 
similar to a tlat drill. As the drill 
wears down, it is often necessary to thin 
the point as shown in Fig. 8. This re- 
sults in doing quicker and better work. 

The angle of the point forms an angle 
..I 135 degrees with the cutting edge as 
shown in Fig. 9. The best clearance for 
drills is from 12 to 15 degrees depending 
on the hardness of the metals, the great- 
er clearance being used on the softer 
metals. 

Drill Speeds. 

In addition to a knowledge of grind- 
ing, the user should learn to run drills 
at proper speed. He will then require 
to grind seldom and will have few break- 
ages. For steel use a speed of 30 ft. 
per min.; for cast iron, 35 ft. and for 
brass, GO ft. per min. For drilling steel 
with a 1-16 inch drill, this means 1834 
r.p.m.. while for brass it would mean 
3668 r.p.m. 

The table. Fig. 10, taken from the 
American Machinists' Handbook, gives 
the speeds for all drills up to 3 ins. 
These speeds require plenty of lubri- 
cant and are for carbon steel drills. 
High speed steel drills will stand about 
double these speeds. 

Drill Shanks. 

One of the great wastes in drilling 
practice is in the breaking of the drill 
tangs. This breakage is caused usually 
by a lack of grinding and drill speed 
knowledge. Manufacturers of drills 
lave placed on the market drills with 
straight shanks, double grooved shanks. 
sockets using pins, double tang sockets, 
etc. All these have been of value. By 
means of such schemes as the double 
tang sockets, drills have been reclaimed 
from the scrap heap. 

Fig. 11 shows a method of driving a 
drill with a broken tang. The writer 
has drilled holes through socket and 
drill shank and inserted a pin. Fig. 
12 shows a scheme for overcoming the 
breakage of tangs altogether. 

All High Speed Steel Drills. 
Fig. "l.'S shows a vanadium high power 
twisted drill. The steel used contains a 
very high percentage of tungsten with 



or pin, which fits into the spiral grooves 
of the twisted shank and engages in 
direct contact with the drill. This pin 
relieve the tang from pressure of driv- 
ing. 




Fig. 13 — High-speed Twisted Drill and Socket. 



Fig. 14 shows a high speed steel drill 
made from flat bar stock. Pieces are 
riveted to the flat shank to give it the 
conical taper of the usual cut twist 
drill. 



INSTRUCTION IN SHOPS. 

Dr. Galbraith, dean of the School of 
Practical Science, Toronto, writing in 
his report refers to instruction in shops. 
He says that in addition to advancing 
means of transportation the University 
may soon be called upon to increase its 
facilities for coming into closer touch 
with trades and manufacturers. Indus- 
trial education is now a live topic. 
There seems to be no great reason why 
scientific and trade schools should not 
be established in their own works by 
the proprietors. A sufficient number ol 
qualified teachers may be found among 
the officers and foremen to make a be- 
ginning. By proper co-operation between 
employers and their operatives such 
schools should be a success and justify 
their cost. 

The University should provide for the 
education of the heads of the scientific 
departments in such works, and incident- 
ally it may be of service in advising and 
encouraging the teachers in_ the works 
school. This method of initiating in- 
dustrial schools would reduce to a 
minimum the danger of establishing them 
where they may not be needed. It will 
soon be necessary, he states, to help the 
shipbuilding industries by instituting a 
course in naval architecture. 



In cold weather, steam generated in 
electric boilers will be used to maintain 
the temperature in the cars, and keep 
the various connections from freezing, 
when the trains' of the Pennsylvania 
railway, entering New York station 
through the electrified tunnel zone, are 




Fig. 14— "Flat" Twisted Drill is Made Ready for Taper Socket. 

the adition of vanadium and chromium, disconnected from their steam locomo- 

special feature is the "increased" tives. These electric boilers will utilize 

The illustration also shows the the 600 volt direct current from the third 

socket. At the mouth of the interior of rail, and generate steam at 80 pounds 

the socket there i- a circular steel hoss pressure. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



71 



Machine Tool Manufacture — Quality and Guarantee 

By Penstock 

Being a Brief Review of Difficulties and Grievances That Arise 
Between Builders and Users of Machine Tools, Showing in Most 
Cases That the Lack of a Proper and Courtly Exchange of 
Opinion and Action Upon Opportune Advice May Lead to Un- 
tntrrantable Conclusions Being Drawn by Both Parties Concerning 
the Transaction of Sale and Purchase Between Them. 



THE design, equipment, test and guar- 
antee put up to-day by makers of 
machine tools may be generally reckon- 
ed as of a very high-grade, so much so 
we think as to be beyond question to the 
limit of human specialization, foresight 
and insight presently existing. 

The purchaser, however, does not al- 
ways see it in that light, and trouble 
between the manufacturer and user re- 
sults. Inaccuracy of work produced by 
the machine is the fruitful cause, and 
an often unreasonable deduction on the 
user's part hastily arrived at, gives the 
maker credit for careless construction. 
A condition like this is naturally unsat- 
isfactory and annoying to both parties, 
reflecting as it does on the manufac- 
turer and his business, and injuring it 
may be, the quality and quantity of the 
user's output. 

In the writer's experience probably the 
chief element affecting the reliability of 
a machine is that due to the user tak- 
ing it to pieces for examination pur- 
poses, when it arrives from the builder. 
That he is perfectly within his right in 
doing so no one will gainsay, but that 
he shows wisdom in his action is open 
to serious doubt. 

I have often wondered if curiosity to 
see the very vitals of his purchase is not 
in some real sense suggestive again of 
the eagerness of cbildhood to break the 
outer shell of its toy to investigate the 
source of the "squeak," and if the re- 
sult in either case has not a parallel in 
that neither are qualified to replace pro- 
perly the whole again. 

The practice, mark you, is followed by 
expert users and may not always be 
chargeable to quest for opportunity of 
criticism ; but to a desire and the very 
laudable one of admiring the construc- 
tive design and workmanship. 

From whatever motive the dismantl- 
ing takes place, a grave error is com- 
mitted. The user seldom has the equip- 
ment to re-assemble the machine as it 
should be and was, when it left the man- 
ufacturers' hands. The latter is the real 
architect of its structure, the former 
simply buys the use of it. 

A man when he buys a home does not 
take it to pieces, and being satisfied try 
and put it together again with a view- 
to living comfortably. He rather relies 
upon and accepts his own judgment in 
the purchase believing that he has got 
what he bargained for from a reputable 
seller 



Machine tool builders cannot afford 
to-day to be other than reputable, it is 
their particular and chosen business, 
they are equipped for it and are willing 
to guarantee their individual output. As 
a user then give them that trust you 
like reposed in yourself, by refraining 
from dismantling their product and pil- 
ing cost and worry on yourself and 
them. 

Most machine tool makers record the 
tests of their product, and furnish the 
purchaser with a copy showing the 
limit of error established. 

As distinct from the source of trouble 
just discussed, other features of heart- 
burning are quite common. One of those 
is inaccuracy of levelling when the ma- 
chine is installed and the want of ver- 
ification after operation has been going 
on for a few months. This inaccurracy 
of level is due in large part to the want 
of proper appliances or to improper ap- 
plication of them. 

Levelling should be done lengthways 
and across, before the machine is bolted 
to its foundation. Wood packing or 
wedges to which oil or water may have 
access and settlement of foundations are 
each conditions liable to affect origin- 
ally correct setting and require careful 
keeping track of. 

Some makers make a point of inform- 
ing their user purchasers of what to do 
and what not to do, a course made ne- 
cessary for their protection and emanat- 
ing from past experience. 

A lathe manufacturing concern we 
have in mind impresses on its custom- 



Another feature that users do not 
sufficiently realize, although laid great 
stress upon by the manufacturer, is the 
question of sufficient lubrication. Ma- 
chinery in motion of any description, de- 
pends for its continuous and efficient 
running with minimum tear and wear, 
on regular and systematic lubrication. 

For machine tools best quality min- 
eral oil is recommended, having in 
view the high speed and heavy cutting 
demanded in present day practice. Like 
quick revolution, forced and self lubri- 
cating engines, the wear on bearing sur- 
faces of machine tools should be nil. The 
lubricant should be of quality and quan- 
tity to form a film between the sur- 
faces, which film in its turn prevents 
contact of them, and by cutting out 
wear enables the machine to maintain a 
continuous accuracy of production. 

From what has been said it will be 
realized that much is to be gained by 
maker and user alike from a proper un- 
derstanding of the question as it relates 
to each. The tendency we are glad to 
say is in all business relationships, to 
deliver to the hilt and to consummate 
a square deal. 

Every known existing obstacle should 
therefore be thrown aside, not only as 
between machine tool builder and user, 
but with respect to every other business 
relationship of man and man. 



HOME-MADE STILLSON. 

The usual Stillson wrench, costly as 
it is, is often dispensed with in places 
where it would prove quite useful, other 
tools taking its place. AVm. Kennedy 
& Sons, Owen Sound, have a home-made 
article, which while costing but a frac- 
tion of the real article, meets all their 
shop requirements. 

The body of the wrench, A, consists 
of a forging bent, as shown at the left 
with the right-hand end turned down 
to form a handle, the upper part of the 
handle being threaded, and the sides 
milled flat to the thickness of the nail- 




ers the necessity of carefully trying out 
the tool and- asks to be thereafter in- 
formed as to faults or otherwise. They 
especially lay stress on the unwise 
course of attempted rectification by the 
user, and urge their willingness to re- 
place defective parts or provide expert 
adjustment where necessary. The manu- 
facturer, as we take it, is prepared to 
furnish the machine complete and perfect 
for the work, leaving the operator to 
see to his own particular sphere. 



Stillson. 



die. The gripping jaw, B, is a steel 
forging, with teeth, as shown, the whole 
being pivoted on the sliding part, C. 
The sliding part, C, is shaped to fit 
loosely over top of the threads, and the 
flattened sides, the latter preventing its 
turning. The lower face of C has a lip, 
which engages in an annular groove in 
the nut, D, which may be revolved to 
give the proper adjustment. All the 
parts being forged are very strong. Sev- 
eral different sizes are in use. 



Boiler Design, Construction, Operation, Repairing and Inspection 

By H. S. Jeffery 

The Various Points in Connection With Boiler Practice Will be Clearly Taken up 
in This Series. The First Article Denis With the Boiler Shell, Including Repair- 
in;/. Factor of Safety, Hydrostatic Test and Number of Courses. The Series Will 
hi a CompleU Text Book on tht Subject of Boilers, and They Should be Preserved 
for /.'' ft r< nci . 



Size and Number of Boilers. 
- In deciding upon the length and 

. tabular boiler, the boiler 

- or is called upon to consider 

itters. The steam pressure per 

square inch is one consideration, and 

the boiler horse-power desired another 

:ion. Decide these: then size 

and number of boiiers. 

The solution of whether one large 
two or more smaller boilers 
should be ins must be governed 

by the circumstance of each case. 

The purchaser will be inclined as a 
rule towards the large boiler rather 
than two smaller boilers on account of 
the former in regards to first costs be- 
ing cheaper than the latter. 

The boiler room having only one 
boiler usually means Sunday work for 
the operating engineer; the passing over 
until a "more favorable time" repairs 
which should be made promptly and 
which if made at the ri<j-ht time wou'd 



battery of boilers to install one or 

two more boilers than necessary, the 

same being out of service, except when 

used in lieu of one of the regular boilers. 

It is advisable and true economy as a 




Fig. 9. 

general rule not to depend upon one 
boiler. There are instances where plants 
at their busiest season, employing con- 
siderable force, have had to shut down 
for several days in order to make re- 
pairs to the boiler. --' 

The length and the diameter of a 



CRACK NOT DANGEROUS 




Shell Thickness Increases with Diameter 

(9) Increasing the diameter of a boiler 
means an increase in the force acting 
upon the longitudinal plane. For in- 
stance: The force acting on the longi- 
tudinal plane of a 66 inch by 16 ft. 
boiler will be with 100 pounds pressure 
per square inch as follows: 

66 x 192 x 100=1,267,200 pounds. 

With a 72 in. by 16 ft. boiler, same 
pressure per square inch as in the fore- 
going example, the total load on the 
longitudinal plane will be: 

72 x 192 x 100=1,382,400 pounds. 
Thus, 1,382,400—1,267,200=115,200 
pounds difference. 

In considering the diameter of the 
boiler and the thickness of the shell 
plate, it is necessary to consider the 
efficiency of the longitudinal seam. For 
instance : The allowable working pres- 
sure on a 66 inch by 16 ft. boiler, plate 
60,000 tensile strength and 7-16 in. in 
thickness, factor of safety of 5, efficien- 
cy of longitudinal seam 70 per cent., 
will be: 

60,000 x .70 x .875 

= 114 pounds. 

66 x 5 



DANGEROUS CRACK. 




Fig. 



Fig. 8. 



in many instances have saved the owner 
considerable, and in other cases would 
have prevented a boiler disaster. 

With a battery of boilers it is not 
difficult to cut out of >ervice one boiler 
for repairs without causing a shut-down 
of the plant or part thereof — in fact it 
is the practice with some when ins>tal!- 



•Serond of a series of articles on this sub- 
ject. 

••Copyright by the MacLean Publishing 
Company. 



boiler is sometimes a mere matter of 
choice. Other times the designer must 
consider the space allotted for the boil- 
er. Perhaps it is the desire to install a 
66 inch by 16 feet boiler, but the limited 
space will require the length to be 
limited to 14 feet. In this case it would 
-itate increasing the diameter, or 
in lieu of the 66 inch by 16 feet boiler 
there would ordinarily be installed a 
72 inch by 14 feet boiler. 



Now, a 72 in. by 16 ft. boiler, same as 
the above in regards to tensile strength, 
thickness of plate, factor of safety, but 
with a longitudinal seam having an 
efficiency of 80 per cent., will be allowed : 
60,000 x .80 x .875 

= 113 pounds 

72 x 5 
Assuming the horse-power of a 66 in. 
by 16 ft. boiler to be the same as the 
horse-power of a 72 in. by 14 ft. boiler — 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



and many boiler manufacturers have 
them so rated — the 66 in. by 16 ft. boiler 
would be cheaper as to first costs and 
ordinarily would be a better steamer 
than the 72 in. by 14 ft. boiler; and be- 



Thiis is due to the plate only being in- 
directly cooled by the water within the 
boiler; hence, it becomes semi-over- 
heated, setting up stresses which crack 
the plate. The cracks are not s&rious — 



WATER ON T M\5 SIDE 




Fig. 10. 

bag a better steamer would not consume 
as much fuel. 

The chief reason why the 72 in. by 
14 ft. boiler would cost as much and 
perhaps more than a 66 in. by 16 ft. 
boiler, is due to the fact that the former 
will ordinarily be constructed with a 
shell plate at least 1-16 inch heavier 
than the latter; also, the former boiler 
will require more tubes than the latter. 



FLUE SHEET 



IMOICATE9 
ACTION OF FORCES 




Pig. 11. 

and a Little more work in the way of 
drilling flue holes, rolling flues, etc. The 
total costs of the respective boilers will 
not, however, be a great differential. 

The question has been asked more 
than once as to why Marine Boilers are 
constructed ten feet and more in diam- 
eter, while tubular boilers are rarely 
taade greater in diameter than seven 
feet. The reason why Marine Boilers 
fan be made large, having shell plates 
from one in. to one and one-half in. in 
thickness, is due to the fact that the 
shell plates are not in contact with the 
flames and hot gases. 

The better part, one-half or more, of 
the shell of a tubular boiler is in con- 
tact with the flames and hot gases, and 
is a part of the heating surface of the 
boiler. 

Fire-Cracks. 

(10) The heavier the plate the more 
liable it is to become overheated. This is 
especially true if foreign substances are 
allowed to adhere to the plate. Fre- 
quently the plate of the girth seams of a 
tubular boiler crack from the rivet hole 
to the edge of the plate, as shown in Fig. 
7. which is spoken of as fire-cracks. 



that is, dangerous, unless there are many 
such cracks. If, however, the crack ex- 
tends into the solid plate, then take steps 
at once to prevent the crack from ex- 
tending itself. 

The girth seam of a tubular boiler 
directly over the bridge wall, as shown 
in Fig. 6, usually receives the impinging 
flame and dne to the double thickness of 
metal, as well as the rivet heads, the 
metal at this point is many degrees hot- 
ter than at other points, resulting in fire- 
cracks. 

Fire-cracks are frequently calked over 
and remain steam-tight. Sometimes they 
become troublesome and are taken care 
of by chipping out and calking, as shown 
in Fig. 8. Of late some manufacturers, 
who have adopted the two-course tubular 
boiler type of construction, are now driv- 
ing the rivets in the lower part of the 
girth seam as shown in Fig. 9. This, 
however, they are limiting to just the 
girth seam over the bridge wall and 
about two feet up on each side of the 
boiler. 

It is possible for the boiler designer 
with some types of boilers to design the 
boiler lines to prevent undue cracking 
of the plate from the rivet holes to the 
calking edge. 



flames and hot gases. The beveling of 
the plate and the installation of the 
rivets with oval head is for the purpose 
of having as little metal as possible in- 
directly cooled by the water within the 
boiler. 

Such a practice is applicable with th<» 
furnace of the locomotive type boiler, 
for the force acting on the furnace acts 
as indicated by arrow, Fig. 10, and thus 
the plate from the centre of the rivet 
hole to the edge of the plate has no force 
acting upon it, while the plate from the 
centre of the rivet hole to the, edge of 
the plate of the girth seam of a tubular, 
the same being indicated in Fig. 11, has 
to resist the force acting upon the trans- 
verse plane of the vessel. 

The distance from the centre of the 
rivet hole to the edge of the plate with 
the girth seam of a tubular boiler should 
be one and one-half times the diameter 
of the rivet hole, while the distance a. 
Fig. 10, can be considerably less— usu- 
ally about 1 1-8 times the diameter of 
the rivet hole — and, because of the ac- 
tion of the force as described. 



DOVETAIL ROLLER. 

In the old • style gate valve made by 
the Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, the 
wedge or gate is made of cast iron with 
brass facing. This brass facing piece is 
dovetailed into the cast iron wedge, by 
a circular dovetailing groove. Because 
of its form, it is impossible to fit them 
together because of the bottom of the 
dovetail groove being greater in diam- 
eter than the top. For that reason, 
other means are used. The two contact 
faces of both .wedge and facing are ma- 
chined, so that the facing will drop in- 
to the recess in the wedge. By means 
of the rollers shown in the accompany- 
ing sketch, the brass of the facing, is 
forced outward into the dovetail groove, 
making a solid union between the two. 
The face is afterwards machined to give 
the bearing surface. 

The manner of operating the rollers is 
as follows : The plate A of which the 




Dovetail Roller. 



This can be done with the furnace of 
locomotive type boilers. The practice is 
to bevel the door sheet and the flue 
sheet, especially the latter, for it is the 
heavier of those composing the furnace, 
in the manner shown in Fig. 10. 

The rivet holes are countersunk ami 
the rivets driven with an oval counter- 
sunk head on the side in contact with the 



rollers consist, is placed on a square 
piece in the tool post, and over which 
hole B fits. The tool post is centralized 
and pressure brought to bear on it shov- 
ing the two hardened steel rollers C 
against the brass. The rollers are cor- 
rugated, which, added to the pressure, 
forces the brass outward into the dove- 
tail groove. 



Mechanical Drawing and Sketching for Machinists 

By B. P. 

.1 Series of Progressive Lessons Designed to Familiarize Mechanics With the Use of the 

Apparatus \ lary to Make Simple Drawings, to Encourage them to Realize How Im- 
portant a Factor it is of Their Equipment, as Well as Being a Profitable Pastime. 



A N accessory to progress and good 
■**■ drawing work is a reliable equip- 
ment of tools. This need not be too 
expensive unless the aim is ultimate 
daily use in a drawing office. The var- 
ious items described are such as will be 
found at least sufficient for the course 
as already outlined. 

Apparatus and Applications. 

The first necessary requirement is a 
drawing board, and this should be as 
large as can be conveniently handled in 




Fig. 2 — Drawing Board. 

an ordinary furnished room. Sizes 17 
by 24 inches minimum to 23 by 32 inches 
maximum will in most cases be found 
suitable. .Fig. 1 in our first article of 
the series showed an adjustable board 
and table combined, while Fig 2 shows 
a simple board for use on a table or 
bench 

The drawing hoard should be located 
where you have the benefit of a good 
light and your relation to it such that 
the light strikes the work from the left 
hand top corner. To realize the full ef- 
fect on your paper, the light should be 
shaded, and to obviate excessive stoop- 
inn the board should be placed conven- 
iently high and slightly sloped toward 
care being taken that the slope is 
nol so great as to cause your tools to 
roll or slide off. 

drawing paper should be bought 
in sheets of Sizes 15 by 20 inches and 22 



drawing board may run just over the 
edge on which the head of the tee square 
slides and does not therefore give a 
truly square line to that edge. When 
overhanging the other edges it invari- 
ably gets ragged and inclines to tear in 
on the work. 

Drawing sheets are not usually perfect- 
ly square edge to edge, therefore when 
fixing to your drawing board see that 



middle of the paper length, also ^-inch 
in from the edge of the paper. Tacks 
should never be placed on the left or 
right hand edges intermediate to those 
at the corners as they interfere with the 
movement of the tee square and tend to 
chew its edge. The drawing paper should 
be drawn flat and tight when being 
tacked to the board. 





Fig. 5— Bale Head 
Drawing Tacks. 

the edge next the tee square head or 
left hand is parallel with that edge of 
the board. 

For practice purposes good paper is 
indispensable and Whatman's hot press- 
ed demy and imperial are recommended. 

Regular drawing office work admits of 
very inferior quality of paper being used, 
the reasons being that the draftsman is 
usually expert enough to treat it ten- 
derly while making use of it and that 
immediately the tracing copy is made 
the drawing sheet finds a resting place 
in the waste paper basket. You, if a 
beginner, would experience much disgust 
with your efforts and their effect on 
poor quality paper and as it is an in- 
tention to minimize your self-abasement 
as far as possible, good quality paper 
in your hands becomes a necessity. 

Figs. 3-4-5 illustrate various styles 
and sizes of drawing tacks, those with 



Fig. 6 — T-square. 

The tee square, Pig. 6, should be at 
least the length of the drawing board 
between the inside of head and point 
and should not exceed that distance, if 

possible for convenience. A tapered 

blade as shown gives usually a belter 
balanced tool and excess length upper 
part head over the lower should be a 
feature. This admits of the tee square 
being' operated close down to the lower 
edge of the sheet without danger of the 
horizontal lines being out of square with 
the left hand edge of the board through 
insufficient bearing surface of head. The 
drawing edge must never be used for 
cutting paper. 

The tee square should be hung up by 
the hole in blade when not in use and in 
the case of it falling to the floor acci- 
dentally at any time, a line previously 
drawn by it on the hoard and used as a 
setting standard should be taken to re- 




S##® 




9 . ; LjM ^nm 




Fig. ■'; Bevel Head Drawing Tacks. 



Fig. ,4— Stamped Drawing Tacks. 



by 30 inches respectively to suit the 

drawing boards already referred to and 

ensure no overlap beyond the board 

Paper used of the full size of 



•Second "f a *>ii.-s .,f : ,n Instruction Coarse 
- in win be given each month. 



the bevelled edges, Fig. 3, being per- 
haps the most suitable at a diametei 
of ^-incli. One tack should be placed at 
each corner about A-inch in from the 
edges of the paper and a further tack 
placed at the lower edge about the 



set the blade if it has shitted. 

The purpose of the tee square is the 
drawing of right angled horizontal lines, 
and the forming of a base on which the 
triangles or set squares rest when ver- 
tical or angular lines are required. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



75 



NEW UNITED STATES STEEL PEN- 
SION PLAN. 

Plans have been consummated to pay 
pensions from the United States Steel 
and Carnegie Pension Fund, which was 
established last spring by the joint ac- 
tion of the United States Steel Corpor- 
ation and Andrew Carnegie. This fund 
was established for the purpose of pay- 
ing old age pensions from the income of 
the fund to employes of the United States 
Steel Corporation and its subsidiary com- 
panies. For this purpose the United 
States Steel Corporation provided eight 
million dollars, which, with the Car- 
negie Relief Fund of four million dollars, 
created by Andrew Carnegie on March 
12, 1901, makes up a joint fund of twelve 
million dollars. This pension fund is ad- 
ministered by a board of twelve trustees, 
through a manager appointed by the 
board, with such powers and duties as 
may be given him by the board. 

The Board of Trustees has adopted 
pension rules for the administration of 
this fund, to take effect on January 1, 
1911, and apply to persons who are in 
the service of the United States Steel 
Corporation and its subsidiary com- 
panies on and after that date. 

Under the pension rules three classes 
of pensions are provided : 

First— Pensions by compulsory retire- 
ment, granted to employes who have 
been twenty years or longer in the ser- 
vice and have reached the age of seventy 
years for men and sixty years for wo- 
men. 

Second—Pensions by retirement at re- 
quest, granted to employes who have 
been twenty years or longer in the ser- 
vice and have reached the age of sixty 
years for men and fifty years for women. 

Third — Pensions for permanent incapa- 
city, granted to employes who have been 
twenty years or longer in the service and 
have become permanently totally incapa- 
citated through no fault of their own. 

The monthly pensions to be paid from 
the income of the fund will be made up 
on the following basis. For each year of 
service 1 per cent, of the average reg- 
ular monthly pay received during the 
last ten years of service ; provided, how- 
ever, that no pension shall be more than 
$100 a month or less than $12 a month. 
For example, an employe who has been 
25 years in the service and has received 
an average regular monthly pay of $60 
a month will receive a pension allow- 
ance of $15 a month. 

This pension fund provides for the 'sup- 
port of faithful employes in their old age 
It is entirely separate and distinct from 
the voluntary accident relief plan put in- 
to operation by the United States Steel 
Corporation on May 1, 1910, which pro- 
vides for employes who may be injured 
and the families of employes who may 
be killed while at work in the service of 
the subsidiary companies of the United 
States Steel Corporation. 



Neither the voluntary accident relief 
plan nor the United States Steel and 
Carnegie pension fund involves any con- 
tribution from the men themselves to- 
ward the accident relief or old age pen- 
sions. 



Societies and Personal 

J. G. Sullivan has been appointed as- 
sistant engineer on the C. P. R. with 
headquarters at Winnipeg. 



J. G. Taylor, heretofore superinten- 
dent district 1, Alberta division, C.P.R., 
Medicine Hat, has been appointed gen- 
eral superintendent Lake Superior divi- 
sion. His headquarters are North Bay. 

* * * 

H. McDonald, fitter in the C.P.R. 
Lethbridge shops, Alta., has been ap- 
pointed shop foreman there. 

* * * 

M. A. Cardell, heretofore C.P.R. shop 
foreman at Lethbridge, Alta., has been 
appointed shop foreman at Medicine 
Hat, Alta., vice J. McQuarrie, appoint- 
ed locomotive foreman at Sutherland, 
Sask. 

* * * 

Peterboro Lodge, 286 of Machinists, 
held an anniversary night on Jan. 26, 
when a social time was spent. 

* * * 

The Canadian Railway Club, Montreal, 
meets at the Windsor Hotel, on March 
7, when a paper will be presented by L. 
R. Clausen, Divisional Supt. of the C. 
M. & St. P. Ry\, Chicago, 111., on the 
subject of "Railway Signalling." 

* • * 

Thos. Arnold, vice-pres. Taylor & 
Arnold, Montreal ; D. A. Evans, drafts- 
man, G. T. P. shops, Winnipeg ; and 
Clifford Walker, Taylor & Arnold, Win- 
nipeg, have been elected members of the 
Western Canada Railway Club, Winni- 
peg. 

* * * 

The McLaughlin Carriage and Motor 
Car Companies, Oshawa, held an Em- 
ployes' Ball on Jan. 24, in one of the 
wings of the new automobile works. The 
ball was a success from every point of 
view, due to the efficient management 
of this committee : H. Cook, B. Mc- 
Cabe, W. Haynes, N. Hall, A. Moffatt, 
A. Brownley, M. Parker, G. Johnston, 
J. H. Beaton, A. McClure, J. B. Mc- 
Cullough, Mr. Waters, W. A. Coad, G. 
C. McKeen, E. Hamilton, Ed. Michael, 
H. Hagerman and Jack Crawford. The 
500 guests were addressed by Robt. 
McLaughlin early in the evening. 
* * * 

St. Thomas machinists held the first 
annual ball in the Engineers' Building, 
St. Thomas, on Feb. 16. The master 
of ceremonies was John Fitzpatrick. 
The committee was composed of John 



Lane, chairman; W. E. Moore, secre- 
tary-treasurer; J. W. S. Booth, J. H. 
Gray, T. Stone, Frank Clark, John I. 
Stewart, W. Follick, Wm. Bortman and 
P. G. Erickson. 

* * * 

The Alberta Wholesale Implement and 
Carriage Dealers' Association held its 
annual meeting Feb. 4, in Calgary. The 
officers for 1911 are:— President, J. A. 
Latimer, Cockshutt Plow Co.; first vice- 
pres., S. H. Roe, Tudhope, Anderson & 
Co. ; second vice-pres., L. P. Winslow ; 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co.; 
treas., A. W. Trickcy, Massey-Harris 
Co.; sec'y, W. E. Hall, Cockshutt Plow 
Co. ; Executive Committee, J. A. 
Brookbank, International Harvester Co.; 
A. W. Trickey; F. T. Wright, Canadian 
Moline Plow Co.; J. Ruttle, McLaugh- 
lin Carriage Co.; O. S. Chapin, Chapin 
Co.; P. D. McLaren, Canadian Fair- 
banks. 

* * * 

Librarian Carson of the London Pub- 
lic Library, has been giving lectures at 
the G. T. R. shops, McClary's, and 
other shops and foundries in London, 
drawing the attention of mechanics to 
books in the library of interest to 
them. 

* • * 

The first of a series of social affairs 
to bring the C.N.R. and C.P.R. mach- 
inists together was held Feb. 17 in the 
Odd Fellows' temple. The evening 
started with a reception at 8 o'clock 
and a concert at 8.30, which included 
many interesting numbers together 
with a short talk by A. W. Puttee who 
acted as chairman of the concert pro- 
gramme. Following the entertainment 
programme there was a luncheon which 
in turn was followed by dancing. A 
joint committee was in charge consist- 
ing of the following:— E. Pearson, chair- 
man; W. J. Paterson, secretary, and A. 
Gamble, M.C.; G. Douglas, D. McCul- 
lough, G. Johnston, H. McDonald, S. 
Miller, M. H. MacGregor, A. Pentland, 
J. Mountjoy, F. Pratt, A. Kain, R. F. 
Ward, J. G. MacFadden, G. Smith, and 
A. R. McEwen. 

* * * 

Lumen P. Sherwood, Peterboro, in a 
competitive examination, won the posi- 
tion of chief assistant of the Depart- 
ment of Railways and Canals, Ottawa. 

* * * 

J. F. I. Thomas, M.I. Mech. E., 
A.M. Inst. C.E., representing the elec- 
trical department of Vickers Sons and 
Maxim, Sheffield, England, spent a few- 
days in Toronto recently on his way 
from England to Winnipeg. He goes to 
the prairie city to supervise the instal- 
lation of the electrical equipment being 
supplied by his firm for the municipal 
hydro-electric works, Point du Bois 
Falls, Winnipeg River, Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



.1. M Burke ilisirici master mechanic 
C.P.R. district No i Atlantic division 
with headquarters at Brownville Jcl . 

Mr has been appointed master me- 
chanic eastern division with headquar- 
ters at Smith's Falls, Ont. 

• • • 

Paul .1 Myler, vice-president Canadian 
Westinghouse Co., Hamilton, has been 
elected president of the Ontario Motor 

ue. 

« • » 

\V E Barnes, roundhouse and locomo- 
tive inspector, Moncton, N.B., has been 
appointed master mechanic eastern divi- 
sion, I.C.R., with headquarters at 

Bfonct 

• * * 

T. Ross has been appointed master 
mechanic of the T. & N. 0. Ry., with 

headquarters at North Hay. 

• • » 

,1 Wadsworth, tor the past 15 
years superintendent of the Falls Rivet 
tchine Co , Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 
has resigned that position, and will on 
and after March 1 devote his entire 
time to the Wadsworth Core Machine & 
Equipment Co., Akron, Ohio. He has 
purchased all machinery, patterns, tools 
and interest from the Falls Clutch & 
Machinery Co., successor to the Falls 
Rivet & Machine Co. for the manufac- 
ture of the Wadsworth core machine and 
equipment as manufactured by that 
company during the last seven years for 

him. 

• * • 

Wni. C Mitchell, formerly superinten- 
dent oi the Dominion Steel Co., has 
opened an office in the Canadian Express 
Building, Montreal, as a consulting en- 
gineer Mr. Mitchell is prepared to un- 
dertake the design of modern iron and 
steel plants, and the securing of econo- 
mies in existing plants. 

• * » 

I T Brower, of the Structural Steel 
Longue Point, Que., has been ap- 
pointed general manager of the National 
Bridge Co Montreal. 

• * • 

Prank Walker, formerly of the C. P.R. 

-rnith's Falls, has been appointed 

foreman of general repairs for the New 

Glasgow plant of the Nova Scotia Steel 

& Coal Co. 

« • • 

S. S i nderwood, chief draughtsman 
G-.T.R. Car Department, Montreal, was 
■ nted recently, with a fitted travel- 
ing bag, and a brooch for his wife, by 
the staff, on his leaving the service, to 
enter that of Taylor & Arnold, dealers 
in railwav equipment and supplies, Mon 
treal and Winnipeg. 

• • • 

The Master Car Builders' Association 
meets in Atlantic City, June 10-21 ; the 



Railway Supply Mfrs. Association, June 
14-21, and the American Railway Mas- 
ter Mechanics' Association June 14-16. 

» • • 

A. W. Horsey, formerly master me- 
chanic eastern division C.P.R. , with 
headquarters at Smith's Falls, Ont., 
has been appointed district master me- 
chanic district No. 1 vice D. L. Jones 
transferred to the Atlantic division. His 
headquarters will be at Farnham, P.Q. 

* * * 

II. Smith, formerly superintendent of 
the Canadian Crocker Wheeler Co., St. 
Catharines, has accepted a position with 
the Canada Foundry, Toronto. 

* * » 

Edward Blake, jr., manager of sales 
for the Wells Brothers Co., Greenfield, 
Mass., for the past four years, and a 
director of the corporation, severed his 
connection with the company Feb 1. He 
has obtained the controlling interest in 
the Canadian Tap & Die Co., Gait, Ont., 
of which he has been trasurer since its 
organization in 1905. He has taken the 
active management of the company's 
affairs and will devote his entire time 
to promoting its business. Mr. Blake 
came from the west nine years ago to 
enter the employ of the Wells Brothers 
Co. as a stock clerk and acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the entire line of 
Little Giant screw thread cutting tools 
and machinery, which was of great value 
in his later work. He was promoted to 
the order department, and from there 
went through the various departments 
of the offices to the desk of sales man- 
ager and manager of the offices. His 
work in this capacity was eminently 
successful and in 190!) he was elected a 
director. 

* * * 

The Late Rohert McDougall, Gait. 
Robert McDougall, the founder of the 
R. McDougall Co., Gait, died on Feb. 
17, at the age of 86. He was born in 
Roxboroughshire, Scotland, and was a 
resident of Gait for 60 years. In the 
early seventies he and his brother 
Thomas, commenced to manufacture 
iron pumps and windmills. Now the 
lines manufactured include metal and 
wood working machinery, pumps, etc., 
a specialty being metal working lathes. 

* • a 

P. J. Smith Banqueted. 

Hotel Quinte, Belleville's famous hos- 
telry, was the scene of a splendid ban- 
quet recently, when the business men of 
1 lie town, assembled to bid farewell to 
I' I Smith, who is removing to Win- 
nipeg. 

For the past four years and a half, 
Mr. Smith has been superintendent of 
the Canada Bolt and Nut Co.'s Rolling 
Mills at Belleville, which he has brought 
to a high state of efficiency. He was re- 
cently appointed manager of the Mani- 



toba Rolling Mills, at Winnipeg, and his 
leaving to assume that position, was 
made the occasion of this unique ban- 
quet. 

W. B. Deacon, president of the Board 
of Trade, acted as chairman, and splen- 




P. J. SMITH. 

did speeches were made by many of 
Belleville's most prominent citizens. 

In response to the toast "Our Guest," 
Mr. Smith, foretold prosperity and busi- 
ness expansion for Belleville. He urged 
the business men of the city to work 
for better transportation facilities both 
by rail and water. This, he thought, 
would result in making Belleville an in- 
dustrial centre. 

That the banquet was such a huge suc- 
cess, was due largely to the efforts of 
Aid. R. C. Chown, who responded to 
the toast of the "City of Belleville." 



CANADIAN BRANCH BRITISH 
MANUFACTURERS. 

The associated firms of W. T. Glover 
& Co., Royce, The Howard Asphalt and 
Troughing Co., The Ashover Fluor Spar 
Mining Co., all of Manchester, England, 
have secured offices in the Lumsden 
Building, Toronto, for the purpose of 
direct representation on and supply to 
the Canadian market of the various spe- 
cialities produced and manufactured by 
them. These latter consist of under- 
ground cables and wires, electric cranes, 
and direct current motors and dynamos, 
asphall troughing for underground con- 
duits and fluor spar for steel smelting. 

C. S. Mallett who will be in charge 
and manage the Canadian business is 
renewing his connection with the Domin- 
ion after an absence of 12 years, all of 
which time he spent at the various 
firms' headquarters he now represents. 

The scope of the business to be under- 
taken will include reporting and advis- 
ing as to the best and most suitable 
equipment required, the supply, delivery 
and erection supervision of same and the 
furnishing of prompt and complete tend- 
ers, plans and specifications. 



MACHINE SHOP METHODS \ DEVICES 

Unique Ways of Doing Things in the Machine Shop. Readers' Opinions 
Concerning Shop Practice. Data for Machinists. Contributions paid for. 



DRILLING KINK. 

By G. B. Marquette. 
In drilling a large number of holes 
elose together, the chips and cuttings 
from the holes being drilled completely 
cover up the marks (lines and centre 
punch marks) of the next holes to be 
drilled, necessitating the operator to 
stop and blow or clear the cuttings 
away, before he can locate the next 
hole. If we take a piece of tin and cut 



==|m^ 



Removing Drill Chips. 

two slits as per sketch and then pry 
the slit up as seen in end view, we can 
pass the drill through the two slits and 
it will be found tight enough to revolve 
with the drill. When the drill has com- 
pleted the hole, we lower the drill until 
tin touches the work when the heavy 
cuttings will be brushed off while the 
finer dust will be fanned off by the 
rapidly revolving piece of tin, leaving 
the work clear, and the next hole centre 
easily located. 



SUPPORTING COUNTERSHAFT. 
By H. Smith. 

This sketch shows a convenient meth- 
od of supporting countershaft gear from 
roof and has the advantage that it can 
be used in conjunction with a trolley and 
chain block for lifting work in and out 
of the machines. Steel I beams are car- 
ried over the line of machines by means 
of cast-iron brackets which are bolted 
to the roof beams. See Figs. 1 and 2. 
These beams for ordinary machine shops 
should be 26 in. to 30 in. apart and their 
depth will depend on the span between 
the roof beams, 6 in. for a 14 ft and 8 
in. for a 16 ft. span being adequate. 
They must run the full length of the line 
of machines to be driven. Their centre 
line is offset from that of the machines 
so that the trolley has its range in front 
of the latter, enabling, say a lathe oper- 
ator to pick up a heavy job from the 
floor and slide it into the centres with- 
out having to obtain the help of a couple 
of men to guide it in for him. 

The countershaft hangers are bolted 
to wood battens which are readily placed 
in position on the steel beams by hook 
bolts. See Fig. 3. 

The main driving pulleys on the coun- 
tershafts are placed in the case of a 



lathe to the left of the headstock so that 
the trolley has a range of action the full 
length of bed in one direction and the 
distance between beam centres in the 
ut her. See Figs. 4 and 5. The whole 
arrangement has a neat appearance and 
saves time both in setting up machines 
and later in handling work too heavy to 
lift by hand. 

Shop Floor. 

The sketch also shows a first-class 
floor for a shop where moderately heavy 
work is handled, say up to 2 tons. The 
earth is levelled off and well tramped 
down before laying the 5 in. of concrete; 
3 in. by 3 in. battens are laid in this, the 
length of shop and about 8 feet apart. 
These battens are bevelled as shown so 
that they have no tendency to pull out of 
the concrete and stand up 1 in. from the 
face of the latter. Crushed breeze is 
then rolled onto the surface of concrete 
when set and levelled off by means of 
straight edge from batten to batten; 
1 1-4 in. spruce boards unplaned, but 
sawn equal in thickness, are then nailed 
to battens in a cross direction. Finally 
hard maple flooring, tongue and grooved, 
is laid, leaving a good level surface pro- 
vided the underneath work has been 
properly carried out. This flooring will 



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mf 



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Arrangement for Carrying Countershaft. 



"8 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



not splinter and has a oertain amount of 
spring in it, due to the spruce under- 
boards and eoke breeze. The latter also 

allows tor a certain amount of ventila- 
tion which is further amplified by the 
maple flooring boards being grooved un- 
derneath. There i- no danger of drj rot 
Betting in and castings dropped onto it 
are not BO liable to break as on a bar.' 
concrete floor. It i> easj on the oper- 
ator's feet. 



DISTANCE GAUGES. 
By G. B. Marquette. 
An addition to the tool store are the 
"distance gauges" as per sketches. A 
creat \anet\ can be made, a combina- 
tion of which will give any required di- 




1 — a Distance Gauge. 



mension. They can be made very cheap- 
ly (an apprentice could handle the job 
in the tool room) and the first cost is 
quickly returned by the rapidity with 
which a tool can be set to the required 
depth. The operator KNOWS without 
stopping to check the cut, that he has 
the given dimensions, and that it is 
RIGHT. 

The apprentice could get them within 
grinding limits and stamp them, then 
harden and grind. 

Fig. 1 shows a distance gauge and 
Fig. 2 the application of one. Referring 
to Ktg. 2, the gauge is hardened and 



J" 

4. 



3* 



Q 



? 






-^ 



ri* 



'■ i ' Hon "f Distance Gauge. 

ground. B is the tool and a chip must 
ken from A to bring it down to 
the thickness shown by the gauge. 



BORING BAR FOR ELLIPTIC CYLIN- 
DER. 
The accompanying sketch shows a bor- 
ing bar used in the works of the John 

In'-'lis Co.. Toronto. I'm- boring elliptic 
cylinders, and which can lie used for 

boring cylinders of any shape. 

The firm, in producing some cylinders 
for a special job cylinders which were 
neither oval nor of the form of separ- 
ated circular segments, in shape, were 
confronted with the proposition of ma- 



chining. A tool something along the 

lines >hown was made, but discarded in 
favor id' this latter bar, devised by G. 
E. Fax. draftsman for the company. 

The construction is as follows: A 
main bar A. swinging between lathe cen- 
tres, the right on the tail-stock centre 
and the left on the head-stock, has a 
.■utter bar B, attached to it by a dou- 
ble arm C, projecting from bar A, and 
this bar B is pivoted on C, by fulcrum 
pin 1>. 

At the right-hand end, a square bar 
E, benl at its lower end, and turned on 
its upper portion, passes through a 
reamed hole F in bar A. This hole F 
has a key-way with corresponding key 
in E to prevent twisting of the part. 
Straps G straddling A, connect rod E 
through pin K to bar B through pin H. 
The lower end of rod E, which, as be- 
fore mentioned, is bent, shaped approxi- 
mately knife-edged, to follow a con- 
tour. On the tail spindle a form exact- 
ly the same in shape as the bore of the 
cylinder, is secured, and the edge at the 
lower end of E follows this, and causes 



I in a circle, the motion would be dis- 
torted. This was practically overcome 
by having an off-set tool at I, turned to 
the left, so that the more the motion 
was distorted due to angularity, it would 
be compensated for by the tool digging 
in further. 



FACING TOOL. 

The accompanying sketch is of a 
handy facing tool made use of by Wm. 
Kennedy & Sons, Owen Sound, for fac- 
ing of bolt holes in propeller hubs, 
tlanges, and similar positions. The usual 
methods of using a flat cutter is fami- 
liar to all. Its principal objection lies 
in the fact that its whole cutting face 
strikes the hard scale first, removing 
the cutting edge before any material 
progress is made. 

The facing tool here shown, operates 
on the principle of a cross cut bar, with 
a plain gooseneck tool, shown at A. 
The end B is bent up to form the goose- 
neck B, which forms the cutting edge. 
This tool is contained in a slot in the 
end of the usual type of bolt hole fac- 



|cr 



TVf 



=sa 



W\- 



"t-Mr-i- 





o 






Boring Bar for 25x16 Engine. 



the tool I to follow the same motion, 
boring the cylinder the same shape as 
the guide. The spring on E causes the 
edge to follow the guide closely. The 
bore is the same as the guide, not only 
in shape, but in size, as the distance 
from D to H is the same as from D to 
I. Projecting piece J takes the strain 
of the cut, causing H.D. and the tip of I 
i" lie in a line parallel to the bar A and 
makes the motion very nearly perfectly 
true, the only error being that due to the 
slight angularity of the pin II at its ex- 
treme positions. The former liar made 
did not reproduce the desired shape SO 
accurately, as the construction was 
somewhat different. Suppose the tool I 
to remain where it is, and the bar B to 
lie across the main bar A, so that the 
lips of B at II would be at K. This 
r bar B would thus be diagonally 
across main bar A, and as the follower 
edge would move vertically, and the tool 



ing bar, and slides crosswise on strip 
C the whole being held in position by 
four cap screws in cap D. The tool A 
is tapped as shown, and a ratchet screw 




Facing Tool. 



feeds the tool across, giving the neces- 
sary cut. The beauty of the tool lies in 
its ability to keep below the hard skin, 
and thus save the tool. 

This principle has been used by the 
company for the last 20 years giving 
great satisfaction. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



79 



Correspondence 

Comments ou articles appearing in 
Canadian Machinery will be cheerfully 
welcomed and letters containing useful 
ideas will be paid for. 

Information regarding manufacturers 
01 various lines, with their addresses 
will be supplied either through these 
columns or by letter, on request. Ad- 
dress letters to Canadian Machinery, 
143-149 University Ave., Toronto.— 

Editor. 

* * •* 

Tapping Hole Straight. 
The correct answer to the question on 
tapping a hole through a sphere is as 
follows : Secure a faced nut over the 
tap and down against the work. If it 
touches all around, it indicates that the 
bap is going in straight.— Apprentice. 

Tinning Cast Iron Cross-Head Slippers. 
Will some of the readers of Canadian 
Machinery give me a method for tinning 
cross-head slippers in quantities so 
they can be planed.— W. A. T. 



LONG LATHE WORK. 

That word "long" in the title is used 

relatively — long in proportion to the 

lathe. A clever method of doing such 

work is by "splicing" two lathes to 

take in long bars as described in Decein- 

ber issue of Canadian Machinery, p. 47. 

Most of us have seen or have worked 

ithes having the range extended by 

means of a planed casting lined up with 

ilic original bed and "tie-rodded" to 

it, and know how seldom such a job is 

well done or remains accurate for any 

b of time. For my part, if possible, 

I prefer to take my chances in one lathe, 

if the work isn't longer than double the 

i apacity of the lathe, and as an example 

will relate one job we used to do this 

way, which had to be finished accurately. 

In Fig. 1 is shown a roller having 

nals at the ends and driven from 

one end, B, which occasionally twisted 

at A under an extra heavy strain. 

Be rollers, new, were 2 1-16 in. dia- 

i , and, as they wore, were turned 

down to 1 15-16 in., the limit of adjust- 

t in the machine in which they were 

They were brought to us to be 

-■■I up, and we usually had to re- 

theru 1-32 in. in diameter to clean 

i he low spots. Our longest lathe 

shorter than the rollers by about 

- feet, which meant that we had to re- 

i I hem to turn the body proper, and 

to resort to some expedient when 

I he journals had to be renewed; some- 

ss we had a combination of both jobs 

to do at one time. 

Considering first the broken journal. 
we commenced by setting the jaws of 
the steady rest to an arbor between 



the centres of the diameter of the body 
of the roller. After that the tail stock 
was taken oil the lathe and the rest 
moved to the extreme end of the ways. 
The other, or broken, end of the roller 
was clamped in a Y-bloek on the cross 
slide of the carriage and lined up with 
calipers approximately true with the 
ways, and the same as the end in the 
steady rest which was already centred. 
Then with a drill in the universal chuck 
the end was drilled out and into the 
hole was driven one end of a bar of 
steel and pinned. To turn a new journal, 
on this inserted bar, its free end was 
gripped in the chuck, and the roller 
turned up to within 1-1000 in. at the 
part nearest to the journal to be. It 
will be noticed that the bar was left long- 
enough to be turned, threaded, and cut 
off outside of the chuck. 

This is, 1 think, about the most sat- 
isfactory way of turning and threading 
on the end of work longer than the ma- 
chine; at one time I had a lot of 12 in. 
pipe to cut off and thread, and did it 
by cutting the pieces about 4 in. longer 
than the made-up length, threading to 
a caliper tit, and cutting off with the 
cut-off tool. 

To return to the roll turning job, it 
can be imagined that when cleaning up 
the body — with a cut never exceeding 
1-64 in. deep — trouble would be experi- 
enced from chattering. We proceeded as 
follows: one end was chucked on the 
journal and the best portion of the roll 
proper turned up with an indicator. The 
steady rest (set first to an arbor) was 
used to support the other end of the rol- 
ler, and was set on the best spot, near 
the end of the lathe, which usually left 
from 2 to 3 feet projecting. 

As to the cut, we started in close up 
to the steady rest with a fine round- 
nosed tool having plenty of rake 
and running with a fine feed. 
After the cut had moved up toward the 
headstock 12 in. to 15 in., it would show 
signs of chattering when we would ap- 
ply a second steady rest as near the end 
of the neAV cut as the carriage would 
permit, and proceed as before, moving 
this "following steady rest" every foot 



* 


♦ I 


1- - 


c* \ 




1 ) 



tion of the roll was considerable, and 

the cut was not heavy enough to keep 
it up against the jaws. 

It was necessary to turn the rollers 
to within 1-1000 in., for which a micro- 
meter was invaluable. We finished with 
a fine file and polished with No. 00 emery 
cloth. This gave us a surface equal to 
the ground finish on the rolls when they 
were new, and fully as accurate. Some- 
times the rolls would show an almost 
fiendish tendency to chatter, and we fell 





L 






1 


— -\ 


i 


r 




) 



-Method <>1 Turning New Journal. 

back on a flat-nosed tool with top rake 
only, setting it so it cut on the side 
next the headstock only, and clear a 
l-.'iL! in. on the oilier side of the front 
edge. 

Those who have accurate turning of 
this nature will find the above method 
a little slow, perhaps, but sure. I pre- 
fer it to a built-on lathe, if the work is 
short enough, but must admit its inferi- 
ority to tin; "double" lathe mentioned 
at the beginning of Ibis article, or one 
good long lathi'. — 1). A. Hampson. 



A centrifugal nil separator paid for 
itself in sixty days in a watch factory. 
It is used to clean superfluous oil from 
the work and to separate oil from waste. 
The oil is used over again. 

The superintendent of an insulated 
wire factory, which employes a great 
number of women operatives, has estab- 
lished a noon lunch room where a meal, 
including soup, meat and a dessert, may- 
be purchased for thirteen cents. The 
restaurant is in charge of a local caterer 
and the figure given covers the cost of 
the meals. 

The Iron Trade Review recently called 
attention to the fact that motors in- 
stalled in machine shops are frequently 
too large, owing to the fact that the 
exact amount of power required is not 
definitely known. As a motor is most 

irA 



t'ig. 1 Roller 

or so. After turning the major part of 
the roll, which was on the lathe, it was 
reversed, set in the steady rest, and cent- 
ered by the chuck till the newly turned 
portion was true. 

We found the second steady rest su- 
perior to a follow rest for the reason 
that the work was held in all directions, 
while with the follow rest the sag to- 
ward the center of the unsupported por- 



mid Journal. 



L 



efficient at full load, the result is that 
there is an undue loss of efficiency. A 
number of cases are cited wherein the 
exact amount of power required was de- 
termined by means of volt meter and 
ammeter readings, showing that the 
motor in use was of too high a power, 
and after this motor was replaced with 
one of the required power, a consider- 
able economy of power was effected. 



80 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



GnadianMachinery 

& MANUFACTURING NEWS^ 

A monthly newapmper devoted to machinery and manufacturing interests 
m«kJS and XSScil trades, the foundry, techn,..! K';''.^^ 
and improvement, and to ill utffl. ol power developed from steam, ga.. elec 
ricily. compressed air and water in C anad.i 



The MacLean Publishing Co., Limited 



JOHS BAYNE MACLEAN 

H. V. TYRRELL, Toronto 

CJ C KKITH, M.E.. B.Sc. Toronto 

PETER BAIN, M.E., Toronto 



President 

Business Manager 
Managing Editor 
Associate Editor 



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Vol. VII. 



March, 1911 



No. 3 



"DIGGING." 

Efficiency campaigns have been carried on and much 
written on the subject. It is known as "good manage- 
ment" or "scientific management" but it really amounts 
to the same thing— "digging," that is, working for the 
best work in the quickest time, at the lowest cost, with 
good wages to the producers of these results. 

The United States Interstate Commerce Commission 
has brought to light systems of management by which the 
output of the plant has been increased, not by increasing 
the equipment or the number of workmen but by invest- 
igating existent conditions and making changes which re- 
sult in greater economies and enable the company to in- 
crease the dividends and pay better wages to their em- 
ployes. 

There can be no objection to the statement : "To get 
the best results irommen, offer inducements commensurate 
with the cost to them of maximum effort." The healthy 
human has no objections to work if it is made pleasant 
for him and he is paid at least market value for his ef- 
forts. 

It is gratifying to note that the reduction in costs of 
manufacturing has been done without reducing wages. In 
fact, experienced organizers provide for largely increased 
wages to efficient workmen who put forth their best ef- 
forts. This is done by means of a piece-work or premium 
system which stimulates effort and rewards the efficient 
workmen. 

There are other means by which costs have been re- 
duced and are reduced. It calls for investigation — or dig- 
ging—to bring them to light, but it pays. In the Feb. issue 
appeared an article on Scientific Management — what it is 
and what it will do. It pays to get away from the "rule 
o' thumb" method of doing things whether in the drafting 



room, manager's office, foremen's office or in the work- 
shop. 

The buying department also calls for some "digging." 
It is well to use a magnifying glass or a microscope occa- 
sionally and search for the little leaks. Recently we 
learned of one company that is losing thousands of dol- 
lars in buying alone. A "rank outsider" discovered it. 

One firm was building its own special machinery. A 
little "digging" revealed that a company specially equip- 
ped for such work would have built the same machines 
for 25 per cent. less. 

Another firm was throwing away the small ends of 
high speed steel cutters and drills, but it was discovered 
by a foreman that these could be used to advantage by 
using the pieces as tips for tools. The method was prac- 
tically that given in "Efficiency of Tools and Economy in 
their manufacture" in the February issue. 

A number of pertinent questions are asked in the ar- 
ticle on "What is Scientific Management," that are worth 
studying. They should lead to "digging" for leaks in . 
your plant. A vigorous search will reveal unthought of 
leaks. One small Toronto factory saved $11,400 in a year 
by scientific management. Reports are continuously being 
brought to light of leaks stopped and the shop being 
brought to a higher state of efficiency, all accomplished 
by "digging." 

MACHINE TOOL COMPLAINTS. 

The article in our present issue entitled "Machine 
Tool Manufacture — Quality and Guarantee" is worthy 
the attention of and careful reading by all users of these 
commodities. The purchase of a machine tool or in fact 
anything from a reputable maker should be recognized as 
something beyond a mere monetary transaction. It 
should be, and really is, the assistance which one man 
gives another in the highest and best sense, enabling each 
to do more perfectly in combination, that which neither 
could perform as well individually. 

The guarantees and advices given users by manufac- 
turers have a real cash value to both, and the sentiments 
expressed in "Penstock's" paper merit the practical 
emulation of all producers and appreciative regard of all 
operators. Machine tool manufacture and operation have 
reached a high pitch of excellence, to maintain and sur- 
pass which must needs demand the helpful co-operation 
of both parties interested. 

THE QUEBEC BRIDGE. 

For the second time since the Quebec Bridge Commis- 
sion has had the plans of a new bridge under consider- 
ation, experts have been called in to settle a differ- 
ence which has arisen between the members of the board 
on engineering points. The immediate trouble, says a 
Montreal paper, is that engineers Modjeska and Macdonald 
favor the St. Lawrence Bridge Co. tender on its own 
plans, while engineer Vautelet favors the Empire Bridge 
Co. tender on the board's plans. 

In the face of this statement we cannot help sympa- 
thising with the minority and complimenting it on its 
pluck and confidence. 

Much good public money has been spent by this com- 
mission in the preparation of plans and specifications, 
which seems might have been saved if builders' plans are 
better, more trustworthy and necessary of acceptance. 

From whatever standpoint looked from, the necessitous 
acceptance of the majority recommendation seems to us 
a reflection on the commission's work, and a certain rob- 
bing of a signal world-honor from it. 

On the other hand it stamps the designer staff of our 
St. Lawrence Bridge Co as a combination whose work 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



81 



commends itself and whose confidence is not likely to be 
misplaced. 

To engineer Vautelet in his meantime lone stand and 
in perhaps greater degree, is due also the commendation 
and public appreciation for a work laid out, his con- 
fidence in its stability and usefulness, and his bid for 
a niche in the temple of fame. 

The decision is a momentous one, the more so on ac- 
count of there being a bridge in the river which like the 
projected one was intended to span that river. 

Bridge designers' and constructors' reputations are at 
stake, the public safety is involved, the development of 
mir country depends somewhat on it, and money is we 
presume not being stinted. 

Let the best be none too good, let there be a Quebec 
Bridge, and may its designers receive their due honor. 



INVESTIGATION SYSTEM OF PURCHASE. 

In the Business Management section of this issue will 
be found an interesting account of the system of machine 
tool purchase adopted by a prominent railroad. Pleasing 
to all engaged in the manufacture and sale of machine 
1 1 mis because ensuring fair competition and recognition 
of merit, it has also shown profit to those responsible for 
introducing the system. 

Points to be noted are the adaptability of the system 
not only to other railroads but to manufacturing con- 
cerns generally, the quality personnel of the committee, 
a unit being the superintendent of piecework, and 
therefore a most appropriate selection to enable that de- 
partment to be fully efficient. 

Such a body gives confidence to the executive that the 
hcsl available in machine tools is being got for a given 
outlay and that nothing which can be superseded and 
scrapped is doing duty on past record. The facilities 
given to get around and see what is being done by manu- 
facturers admit not only of new and untried specialties 
being considered, but effectively stops the prejudice and 
clinging to the well-worn rut so cherished by shop fore- 
men. 

Progress and proficiency can only he attained by 
knowing and seeing what others are doing to help ns 
and recognizing it that way, and any concern that would 
keep its head in front must nose its way first. 



CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS AND EXPORTS. 

Some Canadian manufacturers are evidently unfamiliar 
with methods of extending their export trade. London 
appears to be the hub of trade and inquiries from all 
parts of the world are received by the Consulting Engi- 
neers and buying merchants in London. United States 
and German companies, realizing this, take particular 
care to have their goods known to the merchants in Lon- 
don so that London facilities are offered for the prompt 
securing of specifications, quotations, etc. 

For instance, a firm in India wrote London for infor- 
mation of quotations, etc., on some machinery manu- 
factured in Canada. There was no information available 
without long delays and a great inconvenience resulted 
and probably a loss of the order. 

Another point in the export trade is the elimination 
nf loose methods in dealing with a foreign purchaser. 
The Trade and Commerce fells how an order from Japan 
was lost by one Canadian company because they would 
not fill the order to suit Japanese eondJtTOI} s i SrjcT] 



a short-sighted policy is harmful not only to that 
company but to the Canadian manufacturers generally 
who are looking for an export trade. 

WASTES TIME OF MAN AND MACHINE. 

On a number of occasions "Canadian Machinery" 
has drawn the attention of shop foremen, superintendents 
and managers to the necessity of having sufficient equip- 
ment. J. S. Sheafe, Engineer of Tests, Illinois Central 
R. R., Chicago, 111., in an article entitled "Care and Sel- 
ection of Shop Equipment" recently published in "Rail- 
way Age Gazette," has the following to say about the 
use of grinding wheels in railroad shops: 

"Have plenty of Grinding Wheels. — Grinding wheels, in most 
railway shops, ;ire conspicuous by their absence from convenient 
locations. A machinist would rather continue for a while the use 
of a slightly dull tool than to bother going, perhaps, the length 
of the shop and waiting his turn at the wheel. This is hard on 
the machine, already hard pressed since the advent of high speed 
steel; also on the work and the man. When it is remembered 
that the rate of* deterioration of a tool when dull does not vary 
as the work done, but as the square of the work done, there 
is an abuse all around. Grinding wheels should lie placed in 
all parts of the shop, both machine side and pit side. This 
makes it inexcusable for a man to work with anything but per- 
fect tools." 

A great number of articles included under the head- 
ing of "Shop Equipment," may also be included. The 
above will serve as an example to interest all in keep- 
ing the shop at maximum efficiency. 



AWAY WITH THEM! 

There is too much talk of Ideals. The word is used in 
sermons and poems and after-dinner speeches. Little 
souls roll it on the ends of their tongues and lift their 
mild eyes to Heaven. Surely the truly great have none 
of them — these ideals. 

What is wanted is common decencies — not ideals. The 
word has too much exquisitely nebulous meaninglessness. 
Fat men dream of ideals, and in the morning cheat the 
car conductor. Thin men dream of the same thing and 
abuse their wives. Lovers think their affinities "ideals," 
and wake to quarrel about a certain usage in grammar. 

There are too many "ideals" and too much self-de- 
ceiving. Let us save the word from profanity and hide 
it until hallowing time has restored its sacred shape, and 
in the meantime let us collect samples of common de- 
cencies, honesty of tongue, and hand, and heart — and 
put them in a case, lest in a few generations there be 
none left. 

EXPERIENCE AS A TEACHER. 

No amount of personal experience can ever make a 
man perfect. On a few occasions (fortunately they are 
few) mechanical men have given our subscription men 
as a reason for not subscribing to a mechanical paper 
that "they have worked at their business for twenty 
years and didn't need advice along mechanical lines." 

This view is a very narrow one to take. The techni- 
cal paper does not essay to show a man how to run his 
plant, but by telling what others are doing, giving news 
of the mechanical world, descriptions of new machinery, 
the opinions of other mechanical men, it undoubtedly 
provides a ready means of improving the knowledge in 
connection with the conduct of and work in the shop. 

No matter how extensive a man's experience may be, 
he can still learn something from others and the techni- 
cal paper serves as a means for this interchange of ideas. 
The fact that a man values his opinions so highly, should 
naturally lead him to place some value on the experience 
of others, 



DEVELOPMENTS IN MACHINERY 

New Machinery for Machine Shop, Foundry, Pattern Shop, Planing 
Mill ; New Engines, Boilers, Electrical Machinery, Transmission Device*. 



PIPE THREADING MACHINE. 

The new doable bead rapid nipple 
and pipo threading machine shown in 
the illustration has a capacity of y a to 
:! j inch, inclusive. It reams and threads 
at one operation, pipes of any length 
from a nipple up, being quickly threaded 
on this n achine. 

It is fitted with the Hall improved 
die head. The dies are easily made 
and permit being recul often. Rotary 
oil pump and drip pans form part of 
the equipment. 

This machine is manufactured by 
John II. Hall and Son-. Brantford. 



BOLT CUTTER AND NUT TAPPER. 
The illustration shows a new motor 
driven machine marie by the Wiley & 
Russell Mfg. Co.. Greenfield. Mass. The 
machine proper is their standard com- 
bination opening die machine, equipped 
with their well-known patented "Quick 
Change" opening dies. Electric motor 



i" the bed on which tin? motor shelf is 
secured. This shelf is hinged at back 
and has finished projecting lues which 
rest on cam shaft operated by lever A. 
By this sufficient tension can be kepi on 
belt at all times and belt can be slack- 
ened off when desired to shift it from 
one step to another on cone pulley. 
After belt is tightened the cam shaft is 
locked with a binder. 

The lever B, in front of motor con- 
trols the clutch in the large spur gear, 
so that the bolt-cutter can be stopped 
independently of the motor. The motor 
i< constant speed and back geared and 
is tilted with a rawhide driving pinion. 
Motors can be furnished for direel <<r 



meter. A 2 h.p. motor is used. The 
weight complete is 2,300 lbs. 

SOLID ADJUSTABLE DIE HEAD. 

Lantlis Machine Co., "Waynesboro. 
Pa., lias recently brought out a new type 
of die head known as a "Solid Adjust- 
able Die Head." The purpose of this 
die head, is to take the place of the 
solid dies now used on any of the screw 
machines and other types of machines 
wherein the work is backed out of the 
die after the thread is out. 

The die head is illustrated herewith 
showing the 1 inch standard size which 
has a range from £ inch to 1 inch. It 
embodies the use of the high speed free 





Pipe-threading Machine, John II. Sail & Sons, Brantford. 



Bolt Cutler and Nut Tapper, Wiley & Russell Mfg. Co. 
Greenfield, Mass. 



drive is attached to this standard ma- alternating current, reversing or non- cutting Landis die, with a vny wide 

chine. It can be used i'*.r nut-tapping, reversing. adjustment. The dies are adjusted to 

pipe-threading, cutting off, etc. The arrangement is strongly and and from the centre on radial lines for 

The arrangement is as follows: It carefullj fitted and machine is guaran- different sizes and are held rigidly in 

:-t- of a bracket fitted and bolted Iced lo cul bolts and pipe to 2 inch dia- their seats. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



83 



The die head is held in the turret of 
any ordinary screw machine and trips 
off by retarding the forward movement 
of the carriage. This die head will also 
be made without the tripping device for 
special requirements. The tripping ar- 
rangement is so set that when the 
desired length of thread is cut, the die 
head will trip and revolve with the 
work until the machine has time to re- 
verse. 

By using this die very high eutting 
speeds are readily acquired, equal to 
the turning and drilling speeds on the 
operations of the screw machine. 
so that the speeds need not be reduced 
in the threading operation for the ac- 
commodation of the die as is the case 
with the solid dies. 

Chasers can at all times be ground to 
suit the material to be cut; any amount 
of rake can be given that is necessary. 
I hereby insuring the best possible cut- 
tine condition and securing ideal results. 

The dies are made from high speed 
steel and can be ground and reground 
many times, thus giving a life many 
times greater than any other solid die, 
besides never requiring to be annealed, 
liobbed or retempered, and are readily 
adjustable to take up wear in addition 
to the adjustment for different dia- 
meters. 

One set of chasers can readily be set 
above or below their rated diameter. 
For instance, K inch (13 thread) can 
be set to cut 1 inch diameter when de- 




Solid Adjustable Die Head, Landis Machine 
Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

sired, or they can also be set to en! j , 
inch diameter. The angle in the thread, 
however, will not be quite ideal, but all 
that is required for ordinary screw 
machine work. With other types of die 
heads a special set of chasers is requir- 
ed each time you wish to cut other than 
standard pitches. With this head any 
diameter within the range of the head 
can be cut with one set of dies so long 
as the pitch is the same. Tn very 
special cases where absolutely correct 
pitch is required, it would be advisable 
to use special holders so as to set the 



chasers on the exact angle to corres- 
pond with the angle of the thread. Or- 
dinarily this is not required. 

These heads can be supplied in stand- 
ard sizes with shanks suitable for hold- 
ers in ordinary screw machines. The 
i 2 inch head is 2% inches in diameter, 
capable of cutting a thread of V '■_. inches 



milling purposes and is operated from 
the pilot wheel for both hand feed and 
quick traverse by means of a clutch. 

The outer support for boring bar can 
be clamped securely to the bed, and is 
readily removed for overhanging work. 
The spindle head and outer support for 
boring bar are aliened bv means of scale 




Boring, .Milling- and Drilling Machine, Cleveland Machine Tool Works, Cleveland. 



long. The 1 inch head is 4% inches in 
diameter, capable of cutting a thread 
2y 2 inches long. Other sizes with spec- 
ial shanks will be made to order. 

The dies will regularly be made from 
high speed steel. In no other type of. 
die can high speed steel be used to the 
same advantage as can be used in this 
die, as will be readily apparent on the 
Pace of same. 

This head is manufactured by the 
Landis Machine Company, Waynesboro, 
Pa. 

BORING, MILLING AND DRILLING 
MACHINE. 

The machine shown in the accompany- 
ing cut is a horizontal boring, milling 
and drilling machine with tapping at- 
tachment and vertical feed. 

The spindle runs in solid taper bronze 
bearings with adjustment for wear, and 
has a face-plate to receive large milling 
cutters, etc.. for heavy work; it revolves 
in right or left hand directions and can 
be started, stopped or reversed instant- 
ly, this being convenient for facing, tap- 
ping, miTing and other operations. The 
spindle and back gear drive is located 
between the spindle bearings, bringing 
the power direct to the work. The lever 
for operating back gear and the lever 
for reversing spindle are conveniently 
located on the spindle head, and they 
can be engaged or disengaged while the 
machine is running. 

The spindle bar which passes through 
the spindle, is of unannealed crucible 
steel, 2 1 2 inches in diameter, has 22-inch 
traverse, and is fitted with a No. 5 Morse 
taper. It has power feed in either direc- 
tion : can be securely clamped for face 



and vernier reading .001. The scales 
read 1-64-inch and 1-100-inch direct. 

There are 16 head, platen and bar 
feeds, 8 in number for each position of 
spindle back gear, are positive geared. 
and arranged in geometrical progression 
from .00.1 to .3-inch per revolution of 
spindle. All feeds are reversible. All 
changes of speed can be made while the 
machine is running. 

The machine is made by the Cleveland 
Machine Tool Works, Ohio. 



VERTICAL MILLING MACHINE. 

The half-tone shows a new vertical 
milling machine recently brought out 
by the Rockford Machine Tool Co., 
Rockford, 111. It is adapted to modern 
manufacturing methods and the produc- 
tion of duplicate parts. The machine is 
a radical departure from the old prece- 
dent, the adjustable knee, which is in 
common use. The builders claim all the 
advantages of the adjustable knee with 
the elimination of their undesirable fea- 
tures. 

The column and the horizontal slide 
for the saddle are made in one casting 
By this construction, the table is not 
adjustable vertically, the top of table 
being 30 inches from the floor, the same 
height as a planer platen which is most 
convenient for the operator in handling 
castings or other parts being machined 
The head hearing on column is fully as 
large as the bearing to the knee on a 
machine of corresponding size while the 
weight of the head is much less and 
counter-balanced, relieving the bearing 
of over-hang and uneven strains which 
rapidly destroy their accuracy. 

The general dimensions of the mach- 






CANADIAN MACHINERY 



ino arc .is follow com con- 

• i spindle to column i"> Inches, total 

length of table 56 inches, working sur- 

ol table to 

table lies, maximum distance ol 

to spindle 21 inches, minimum 

distal ■ to spindle 3 inches, 

the head has a vertical movement of 

jlu da bearing on the column 

19 inches wide by 25 J inches long, the 

spindle is 1 inches in diameter al taper 

es ai upper end. It lias an ad- 

by means of sleeve 

and worm gear There arc twelve 

speeds to the spindle, nine back geared 

and three lii ltIi open belt speeds for 

with twelve cha 

step cone 
pullej of winch are 12, 1 *i * 

and ' 1 inch belt. The speed 

[90 r p.m. Three 
: each step of the cone are in- 
tly obtained through the back gear- 
by the manipulation of a vertical 
lever on the side of the machine. The 
two levers are interlocking, preventing 
any two conflicting; combinations of 
gears being engaged at the same time. 
By placing the vertical lever in its neu- 
tral position, the sliding gears are all 
locked out of mesh, then by moving the 
lower of the two levers to the right, 
the clutch is engaged with its mate 
which is out on the end of the shaft 
carry ins: the cone pulley and the three- 
high speeds obtained direct from the 
cone pulley to the bevel gears mi the 
vertical shaft. Twelve speeds to the 
spindle are thus obtained which are 13, 
21.4, 27.4, 35.2, 15. 57.8, 71, 08.3, 
121.6, l">fi and 20(1 r.p.m 

The feed is driven by spur gear from 
the back gear shaft. The clutch fur en- 
gaging and reversing the feeds is placed 
on the upper shaft which is the highest 
speeded shaft in the box. The lever for 
operating the clutch is conveniently 
i in front of the machine. The 
r from the clutch I ransmit- 

ted thro. lip gears at the cud 

of tl i Two pairs of these 

I which are reversible, giv- 
ing four changes. Three changes for 
■ inn of the slip uears are ob- 
'•n the lower 

which a: ed ti\ the lever on 

: box The feeds 

twelve in number range from \ to 17 

antly ap- 
plied to Ihe table, the cross movement 
<«f the saddli ■■ head. 

The power quid 

and valuable time saving < ft is 

claimed by the builders thai ictu.il test 
of a • howed a 

tantial gain in the production i 

of the machine returnii 

ly by power The pi. I ipp ied to 

the reversible clutch bv spur gearing 



direct from the cone shaft. Transmis- 
sion from clutch shaft is through the 
angle shaft equipped with aniversal 
joints to the feed train in front of the 
me. 
The operating levor is conveniently 

placed in front of the. machine 0U Ihe 




Vertical Milling Machine, Rockford Machine 
Tool Co., Rockford. 111. 

right hand side. This is also intei 
ing, making it impossible for 'he feed 
works and the quick return to ,c en- 
gaged at Ihe same time. The device is 
very simple and its operation is as fol- 
lows: — The lever is pivoted with lower 
projection, engaging a rod passing 
through the shaft which is connected to 
a sliding collar by key through a slot 
in the shaft. A shaft passing through 
the column is connected by yokes at 
each side to the sliding collar and the 
jaw clutch on the feed shaft. An out- 
ward movement of the operating lever 
disengages the clutch on the feed shaft 
and the lever is free to be moved to 
the right and left, pass the projection on 
hearing casting, engaging the reversible 
clutch and applying power for the quick 
adjustment mechanism. On duplicate 
parts with an operator constantly on 
ihe machine, all movements can be con- 
trolled by this one lever, as it will he 
seen that, by pressing the lever toward 
the machine, the feed is again engaged. 
However, this in no way interferes with 
Ihe operation and use of the automatic 
stops to the longitudinal and I 
movements. All slides are fitted with 
adjustable taper gibs, adjustable end- 
wise to compensate for wear. The sad- 
dle slide is double gibbed, having a tap- 
er gib on the inside of right hand bear- 
ing, insuring perfect alignment when 
feeding under heavy cuts. All move- 
ments of the table, saddle, head and 
sleeve are provided with graduated col- 
lars, reading in .001. All shaft bearings 
are provided with wool felt oil retain- 
ers. \ very efficient means is provided 
for oiling the driving .shafts and feed 
box. T^ach bearing is connected by a 
soft brass tubes 1-1 n inches in diameter 



which are brought up to a convenient 
location and grouped together in an oil 
cup with hinged cover. 



DOUBLE VERTICAL MILLING 
MACHINE. 

The double vertical milling machine 
shown in the illustration was built by 
i he New ton Machine Tool Co., Phila- 
delphia. The spindle is 6% ins. in dia- 
meter lilted with a No. 7 Morse taper, 
construction permits of having only 
one feed at a time, hut sufficient change 
'-ears are furnished to give feeds of 
..1214 in.. .'J071 in., .28.1 in., .0892 in., 
.0554 in., and .0357 in. per revolution of 
spindle. The feed motion is clutch and 
the drive is taken from the spur gear_ 
in .iinled beside the driving worm 

•'('1. 

The machine has a. minimum cap- 
acity for cutters 2."> 1 / L inches in length 
and for critters to a maximum length of 
.'ItM i inches ami up to 13 inelies in dia- 
mi ter. The minimum distance from the 
work support to the centre of the 
spindle is 10V 2 inches and the maximum 
dislanee is 8 ft. 4 1 / 2 inches. Reverse 
motion to the fast vertical elevation of 
Ihe saddle is obtained through a double 
train of hovel gears engaged by a Car- 
Ivlo-.Tolinson friction clutch. 

The machine is driven by a 20 h.p. 
General Electric type DLC No. 2 motor, 




Double Vertical Milling Machine, Newton Ma- 
chine Tool Works, Philadelphia. 



laving a speed of 450 to 1,350 r.p.m. 

The motion is transmitted from the 
motor through a "quride" gear to the 
large driving spur gear mounted on the 
horizontal shaft on the side of the up- 
right on which is also mounted a bevel 
gear driving the vertical spline shaft. 
The bevel gear on the vertical spline 
*hafi is mounted above the bevel pinion. 
The stresses are thus counteracted and 
the thrust on ilic vertical spline shaft 

bearing i minimized, 



: 



POWER GENERATION \ APPLICATION 

For Manufacturers. Cost and Efficiency Articles Rather Than Technical. 
Steam Power Plants ; Hydro Electric Development ; Producer Gas, Etc. 



BELTS AND BELT DRIVES.- 

By A. E. B. 

'"PHIS concluding article on "Belts 

■*• and Belt Drives," will treat of the 
influence of pulleys on belts, the install- 
ation of belting, the flapping of belts, 
the care and use of belting and belt 
joints. 

Influence of Pulleys on Belts. 

The outer face of a belt travels faster 
than the inner, causing compression of 
the latter and extension or stretching of 
the former. This process has a natural- 
ly injurious effect on the substance and 
life of the belt and should be miminized 
to the fullest extent possible, by using 
large diameter pulleys, those especially 
with little crown. Centrifugal force as 
is well known tends to raise the belt 
from the pulley face with the result that 
only the centre of belt width makes con- 
tact, thereby aggravating the ill effects 




Fig. 11— 18-in Belt-lacing Machine. 



of tension and compression by a de- 
creased surface. 

Pulleys less than 12 inch and 18 inch 
diameter should be avoided, with single 
and double belts respectively. Crown 
pulleys of less diameter than the width 
of the belt for single belts and of less 
diameter than one and one-half times 
the width of double belts should also be 
avoided. The foregoing remarks apply 
more particularly to horizontal and flat 
angle shaft drives. 

Horizintal shaft pulleys should have 
about J-inch per foot crown, while those 
on a vertical shaft should have about 
twice that amount. Flange pulleys chew 

♦Part II. of the second article of the series 
on Power Transmission Equipment, Operation 
and Efficiency Subjects. 



the belt edges and should be side-track- 
ed in favor of wider and extra crown- 
faced types. Fast and loose pulleys 
have also a tendency to distroy the 
edges of the belt due to the shifting 
operation. 

To obtain a greater amount of power 
from belts, the pulleys may be leather 
sheathed, an arrangement admitting of 
a slack belt and a corresponding increase 
of durability. 

Installation of Belting 

In applying new belts, care should be 
taken mat tue proper side goes next to 
the pulley. Belts have what is known 
as a flesh face and a hair face, the 
former of which to the uninitiated might 
suggest itself as the driving face. This 
is not so however, for the reason that 
the flesh lace being tougher, is better 
able to stand the stretching already re- 
ferred to, and the hair side, which is 
predisposed to cracking, wears better 
under compression. 

The top end of splices connecting the 
laps should point in the running direc- 
tion of the belt. Pulleys should be 
somewhat wider than the width of belt 
necessary. 

Horizontal belts and angle drives up 
to 15 degrees from the horizontal plane, 
should have a sag of about |-inch per 
loot, and the underside be the driver. 

Vertical belts should be pulled tight 
to ensure grip on the lower pulley. 

To connect two horizontal shafts run- 
ning at right angles to each other by 
a J twist belt, set the pulleys so that 
a plumb line from centre of face of 
upper pulley on side where belt leaves 
it, will strike centre of face of lower- 
pulley also on side where belt leaves it. 

Shafting and machinery should be so 

arranged that belts will run fr the 

former to the latter in opposite direc- 
tions in order to equalize the strain and 
pull on the bearings. 

Tightening or guide pulleys are applied 
to the slack side of belts and located 
nearest the smaller diameter pulley. 

Increase of belt width should mean a 
corresponding increase in thickness, and 
it is probably true that a thick and 
narrow belt is more durable and works 
rather more satisfactorily than does a 
wide and thin belt. This, of course, has 
regard to the fact that a certain well 
defined ratio of thickness to width 
must exist to ensure stability. 
Flapping of Belts. 

Flapping